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The Goob (2014)
8/10
Guy Myhill's coming of age film is edgy and impressive
27 May 2015
Director Guy Myhill's coming of age film is edgy and impressive, with an eye-catching turn by Liam Walpole matching Simon Tindall's eye- catching photography of a depressing, down-at-heel part of Norfolk. Myhill's feature debut stars Walpole as 16 year-old Goob Taylor, who returns home to his mother (Sienna Guillory) for the summer in rural Norfolk where he grew up. The material in many ways is pretty familiar, but Myhill brings it up entirely fresh, as though this is the first time this kind of story has ever been told, making it feel unique. It's just 80 minutes, but it's got all the story you need packed in there. http://derekwinnert.com/the-goob-2014-movie-review/
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Search Party (2014)
4/10
Raucous Hangover/Road Trip-style comedy
26 May 2015
Search Party is welcome as a raucous Hangover/Road Trip-style comedy. But it is not a very good one, though, to be fair, it's not terrible either. The three main actors try very hard to raise laughs, and are reasonably winsome, and there are quite a few laughs dotted throughout the movie and some really funny moments. T.J. Miller and Adam Pally star as early-30somethings Jason and Evan who set off for Mexico to reunite their buddy Nardo (Thomas Middleditch) with Tracy (Shannon Woodward), the woman he was going to marry until Jason disrupted the wedding. Nardo is naked and in a tight situation until he finds a pair of tights, and then he's in a tights situation. At least till he's back naked again. http://derekwinnert.com/search-party-2105-movie-review/
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Cleopatra (1917)
Last known prints destroyed in fires
20 April 2015
Alas the last two known prints of Theda Bara's legendary movie were destroyed in fires at the Fox studios (in 1937) and at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. It is on the AFI's list of lost films. There can be no voting on it. Cecil B DeMille may have been the last person to see the movie, after he got the Fox print over to his office for a private screening in 1934 before he made his own Cleopatra. The 1917 film is based on H. Rider Haggard's 1889 novel Cleopatra and the plays Cleopatre by Émile Moreau and Victorien Sardou and William Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra.The film stars Theda Bara as Cleo, Fritz Leiber Sr as Julius Caesar and Thurston Hall as Mark Antony. http://derekwinnert.com/cleopatra-1934-claudette-colbert-warren- william-henry-wilcoxon-classic-movie-review-2413/
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2/10
Why does Twister look better?
19 August 2014
Into the Storm takes a stale idea, adds boring characters, a tiny plot and cheesy dialogue, casts a bunch of lost-looking B-movie actors, and splats CGI across the huge cinema screen. But, even after nearly 20 years, Twister looks so much better and is a lot more fun. take a bow, Industrial Light & Magic! The young actors come off best, Max Deacon, Nathan Kress and Jeremy Sumpter, at least giving this dinosaur some teen appeal. The film's serious tone gives it the heavy weight of importance, but it's a popcorn movie that needs to have entertainment on its fore-brain. http://derekwinnert.com/twister-1996-helen-hunt-and- bill-paxton-classic-film-review-996/
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Here and Now (2014)
5/10
Quite mesmerising attractive with a good heart
4 July 2014
Lauren Johns stars as mouthy and obnoxious but attractive young London inner-city girl Grace, who is stuck spending a week in the Wye Valley countryside with her arguing parents (Susan Lynch, William Nadylam), who are trying to save their faltering marriage. Grace sulks moodily around but then she meets quiet, good-mannered, handsome country boy Say (Andy Rush), who, oddly enough, finds Grace both obnoxious and attractive. Against all odds, and virtually wordlessly, he starts to court her. As Say takes Grace around the scenic grandeur of the Herefordshire countryside during the dying days of the summer, the couple search for distraction from their unhappy lives. Against all odds, they find each other. Lisle Turner writes and directs in his first feature. There are very considerable signs of imagination, talent and promise here. It's hardly a film at all, more of a fragile poetic fragment. But it's really quite mesmerising attractive with its good heart, earnest performances and lush shots of the startlingly bleakly beautiful countryside.
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