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"A Series of Unfortunate Events" The Bad Beginning: Part One (TV Episode 2017) Poster

Trivia

Jump to: Spoilers (5)
When Justice Strauss is talking about her library she mentions "The world's most dangerous fungus." This is a reference to The Grim Grotto (Book 11 of A Series of Unfortunate events)
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Briny Beach is named after the beach in "The Walrus and the Carpenter" poem from Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There by Lewis Carroll.
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Edgar and Albert Poe are arguing if a bird is a raven or a crow. This is a reference to Edgar Allen Poe's poem, "The Raven."
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Since the Baudelaires are having spaghetti alla puttanesca for dinner, Klaus wonders what puttanesca means. The answer is not stated in the show as a joke, because it means "like a prostitute."
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Arthur Poe and his sons Edgar and Albert are named after gothic writer Edgar Allan Poe. Edgar and Albert may also be named after poet Edgar Albert Guest. Eleanora Poe is named after "Eleonora" by Edgar Allan Poe.
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Al Funcoot, the play writer of "The Marvelous Marriage", is an anagram for Count Olaf.
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Lemony Snicket walks through a tunnel that has "Horseradish Factory" written on it. That refers to Opportune Odors Horseradish Factory, from The Reptile Room.
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The eye symbols are references to the T. J. Eckleburg billboard from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.
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The front page of The Daily Punctilio has the newspaper's motto, "All the news in fits of print." That's a parody of The New York Times's motto, "All the news that's fit to print."
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Count Olaf says "Hello, hello, hello" in way that's similar to how Count Olaf said it in the movie.
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The yellow trolley passing through the gray Briny Beach, might be a reference to Gatsby's yellow car driving through the Valley of the Ashes in The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. A Series of Unfortunate Events has a lot of Great Gatsby references.
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The trolley driver asks the Baudelaires if they're going to the fair. The silhouette of a Ferris wheel from the fair is later shown in the distance when the Baudelaires are on the trolley with Justice Strauss.
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The theme song shows Bertrand Baudelaire's will.
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The Daily Punctilio article "Children Are Very Sad, and Have No Place to Go" is in Latin.
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The dark red goblet Count Olaf holds in the "Pasta Putanesca" scene is from the "1876 Cape Cod Selection. Designed and sold by Avon, the dinnerware collection has 37 pieces in total and was manufactured by Wheaton Glass from 1975 until production ceased in 1993. The line was officially discontinued in 1995.
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The theme song shows a photo of Violet as a child. The note tacked onto it says, "A child asks questions that a wise man couldn't answer."
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The theme song shows the police report of the fire at the Baudelaire residence.
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Violet may be named after the poem "The Waste Land" by T. S. Eliot, in which the word violet is repeatedly used.
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Violet's Briny Beach dress has whales on it, making it one of the many references to Moby Dick by Herman Melville.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

As Lemony is walking through the sewers there are signs with names and locations which foreshadow characters and events in the future. These include: Montgomery (Uncle Monty, The Reptile Room); Anwhistle (Aunt Josephine, The Wide Window); Orwell (Georgina Orwell, The Miserable Mill); Quagmire (The Quagmire Triplets, The Austere Academy); 667 (the address the Baudelaire's move to in The Ersatz Elevator). The strangest sign is labeled "Fernald", which is the real name of the hook-handed man, revealed in The Grim Grotto.
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The Baudelaires are Jewish. There are hints in the books and Daniel Handler (Lemony Snicket) confirmed that they are Jewish. Thus, in the show, there is Jewish music at the wedding, to which Olaf dances a hora, and there are several Hebrew/Yiddish words in various episodes.
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The Baudelaires are named after gothic poet Charles Baudelaire. Beatrice Baudelaire is named after "La Béatrice" by Charles Baudelaire.
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When Lemony is talking in the family library you can see focused points of light igniting the fires that eventually destroy the home. An allusion to the eventual cause of the fires, Count Olaf's magnifying device.
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You get a hint that the hook-handed man may not be as villainous as the rest of the theatre troupe as he attempts to help Sunny when Count Olaf holds her in the air.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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