Edit
The Meg (2018) Poster

(2018)

Trivia

Jump to: Spoilers (13)
In real life, Jason Statham is an expert swimmer. In the 1990 Commonwealth Games, he represented England in diving. Footage of him competing can be found online. Most of the shots of him in the water are real. A stunt double was used for more hazardous shots.
289 of 295 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In the book, the megalodons are pure white, almost luminescent, from living in an environment with virtually no light. This coloring proved too difficult to render in CGI while still looking realistic, so the megalodons were given the same coloring as great white sharks - gray backs with pale bellies - even though this coloration would only make sense in an environment with light.
297 of 306 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
How and why there are megalodons (believed to have been a shallow-water predator) in a deep sea trench is never explained in the film, while the novels go in-depth with their evolution into an abyssal species (they migrated to the heated hydrothermal vents to escape the ice ages, over millennia gaining a slower metabolism and losing skin pigmentation in the process).
103 of 106 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ruby Rose almost drowned on the set.
438 of 465 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Eli Roth was attached as director before being replaced by Jon Turteltaub. Roth left due to creative differences with the studio, namely that he wanted the film to maintain both its R-rating and a $150 million budget. It was also rumored that Roth, on top of writing and directing, also wanted to play the lead role of Jonas, but the studio believed he did not have the star power.
258 of 276 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The young boy on Sanya Beach who begs his mother to be allowed to go swimming is another homage to Jaws (1975). His mother is wearing a similar swimsuit to the one Alex Kintner's (the second victim) mother wore in the original film.
117 of 123 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In the book, the Meg only attacked at night since living in the deep water made its eye sensitive to light. It only attacked in daylight when it had been blinded during the course of the book. The movie, however, had the Meg in daylight with no consequence.
171 of 182 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
At one point, Jonas jumps into the water and starts singing to himself, "Just keep swimming, just keep swimming..." This is Dory's song from Finding Nemo.
243 of 266 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The film is based on the book "MEG: A Novel of Deep Terror," the first book that author Steve Alten ever published.
181 of 197 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The scene where Meg is pulling one, then two, then three of the floating docks is a subtle homage to Jaws (1975) with the barrels.
72 of 77 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In general, depressurization is not kind to deep sea animals that reach the surface. Compare it to the Blobfish, which lives at depths between 600 and 1,200m, while the Meg dwells at 11,000m deep. The megashark should have turned into mush the second it breached the surface.
95 of 103 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In 1997, when the book was first published, Disney bought the film rights for almost $1 million. The project went into turnaround after Disney caught cold feet about competing with Deep Blue Sea (1999). Alten, frustrated at the lack of movement, wrote his own draft, which he showed to Nick Nunziata, who then delivered to Guillermo del Toro. Del Toro took the project to Lawrence Gordon and Lloyd Levin, who brought on Jan De Bont.
132 of 147 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
When Disney Hollywood Pictures first bought the rights to the novel in 1996, they hired Tom Wheeler, television writer and producer to write a screenplay for the movie. However, his script wasn't considered to be very good so Disney hired another screenwriter Jeffrey Boam, who was most well known for writing scripts for films like Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), The Lost Boys (1987), Innerspace (1987), Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) and Lethal Weapon 3 (1992), but his screenplay was also rejected for same reasons as Wheeler's.

When New Line Cinema took over the project in 2005, another script was written by Shane Salerno, writer of both Alien Vs Predator films, and Jan de Bont was involved in it as director and Guillermo Del Toro as producer, but ultimately it was cancelled once again.
43 of 46 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In the book, Jonas is trying to fix a broken UNIS system. In the film, however, he is trying to save a submersible carrying his ex-wife.
94 of 105 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In the novel, Jonas became a paleo-biologist after his final diving venture (where he allegedly saw a giant white shark's head), which is how he's able to immediately identify the giant shark as a megalodon. In the film, he never actually sees the megalodon in the beginning, and became an alcoholic afterwards, but is able to immediately identify the megalodon on first sight nonetheless.
42 of 45 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Despite being gigantic, the megalodons can still attack suddenly and out of nowhere. Sharks are still ambush predators. As a result, their fins normally only break the surface when they're swimming around or chasing prey down. When they go on the offense, they go underwater and strike from nowhere.
55 of 61 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The supposed megalodon teeth dated to just before the ice ages found by the HMS Challenger are now believed to be much older, but a mineral coating around the fossils slowed their decomposition so that they appeared fresher than they really were.
47 of 52 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
"When we modeled the Meg using correct shark proportions, it looked too sleek and thin, with a too-small dorsal fin," comments Adrian De Wet. "So we had to adjust proportions to Jon Turteltaub's taste, which meant a fatter shark, with smaller eyes and a larger dorsal fin. There were many iterations of the Meg body shape, from long and sleek to shorter and fatter. Too much of a bulbous shape destroys scale and makes it look like a tuna fish or a giant guppy. Too lean and sleek makes it take on the appearance of an eel."
13 of 13 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The Megalodon in the movie is 75 feet (23 m) long, and the species as a whole is given a size range of 70-90 feet (21-27 m). Real Life Megalodons were about 50-60 feet (15-18 m) long, which looks to be about right for the smaller Megalodon.
40 of 45 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Author Steve Alten's daughter appeared as an extra in the film.
65 of 76 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
When Meiying encounters a megalodon for the first time, she's wearing an angel outfit. In the books the main megalodon featured in most of the sequels is named Angel.
34 of 38 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Megalodon generally isn't considered to be in the genus Carcharodon anymore, usually it's considered a species of the extinct genus Carcharocles.
29 of 32 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The names of the submarines are 'Origin' and 'Evolution' referring to Charles Darwin's 'On the Origin of Species' which explains his theory of evolution.
32 of 36 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The Gliders used in the climax are named "Robert Byrd" and "Ernest Shackleton", as an homage of two early explorers of the Artic and the Antarctic.
41 of 49 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The opening of the film features Jonas attempting to rescue the crew of a sunken nuclear submarine, assumedly sunk by the megalodon itself, which Heller served on. Presumably, this is a nod to the first novel, where the Navy attempted to kill the megalodon by hunting it via submarine. Didn't work out so great there either. For bonus points, Heller's brother was a crew member of the sub in the novel.
34 of 40 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
One of the humpbacked whales is named "Gracie". This is the same name as the female humpback in Star Trek IV : the Voyage Home.
60 of 74 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
When explaining the Megalodon to the group using a presentation, there is a photo of a man standing in the jaws of a Megalodon. It has the likeness of Matt Hooper from Jaws (1975).
53 of 65 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In addition, Adrian De Wet notes that real great white sharks can almost look too 'smiley' when they appear head-on, as if with a big grin. So the Meg was designed with a mouth that was less turned up at the sides in order to be scarier. The shape and proportion of the giant shark had to be addressed as well.
9 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
As in the original novel, one of the characters is Jonas' ex-wife - but unlike the book's publicity-hungry Maggie, Lori is both friendly towards Jonas and immediately volunteers to help take out the Meg when it becomes apparent the crew are going to have to do it themselves.
22 of 25 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The name of the boat at the end of the film is "Charlotte." This is also the name of the ship that the character Benjamin Franklin Gates searches for in National Treasure (2004), which was also directed by Jon Turteltaub.
64 of 81 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The name of the Yorkie in this movie is Pippin. The Labrador in Jaws (1975) was named Pippit.
114 of 150 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Winston Chao plays BingBing Li's Father, but he's only 13 years her senior.
26 of 31 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
With a $130-$178 million production budget, and a $140 million marketing budget, the film will need to gross $300 million to break even.
56 of 72 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Kronosaurus gets a quick cameo while our heroes are looking up details on the megalodon. Kronosaurs would first appear in the second book (the revised edition of the first novel also includes one in the prologue).
24 of 29 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The animators looked at how the jaws behave when a shark attacks, what the gills are doing when it turns in anger, how fast is the tail moving to propel the massive body, and added the extra few percent to exaggerate the action, creating a shark that is not only believable, but also terrifying.
11 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Director Jon Turteltaub wanted something that looked prehistoric, so the Meg was designed with a mouth that was less turned up at the sides in order to be scarier.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
By using Viewport 2.0, Imageworks could turn around versions quickly in a kind of 'post-vis' workflow. This included shots that ultimately did not make the final cut of the film. Artists would quickly roto and matchmove plate photography of the actors filmed in a water tank (against an underwater bluescreen) and then hand that over to animation and layout. There was no lighting or compositing done for these early deliveries, but the results were more than good enough for the filmmakers to review shots, after which Imageworks could move onto generating finals with more precision through its traditional pipeline.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
At the beach you can see some children riding a "banana" boat. This is most likely a nod to Jaws: The Revenge (1987).
19 of 24 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In its early stages of development, the film was touted as a George Clooney vehicle.
49 of 69 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Jonas was a DSV pilot for the navy in the original book whereas in this one he was a rescue diver (though the film's Jonas retains the original's status as an Ace Pilot of submersibles). This is used to concisely explain why he in particular is chosen for the rescue mission despite being considered insane: he's the only man to ever perform a rescue that deep and survive.
21 of 28 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Given its shark is 70 feet long, believability was already pushed to the limits. Still, that did not deter Production Visual Effects Supervisor Adrian De Wet from closely referencing real shark behavior and using that as a leaping-off point for the film's Megalodon.
8 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Water sequences were filmed in two tanks built in Kumeu, New Zealand. One was relatively shallow but with a large surface area, and contained a high 200-foot greenscreen on one side for water surface shots. The second smaller tank, a deep water tank was circular and covered by a 'blue sky' roof and lined with blue pool liner. "This tank was for underwater action shots, such as when Jonas battles the Meg underwater in the third act of the film," says Adrian De Wet.
8 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Another weapon in Imageworks' arsenal was Ziva Dynamics' muscle, and skin-simulation plugin, Ziva VFX. The software takes a physically-based approached, which means more accurate looking skin sliding and movement straight out of the plugin. "If you build your skeleton accurately, that's the starting point," says Sue Rowe. "The system the guys have written will then make the muscles and skin move in the correct way so you don't have any intersections and it won't fold in on itself. What was interesting was, it's also flexible. So if I wanted to have the shoulder of the shark shudder, but in a really extreme way, we could push it to that if we wanted.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In addition to the shark itself, Imageworks had to imagine an underwater environment, parts of which required vast amounts of coral. The studio had developed a scattering tool for plant life on Kingsman: The Golden Circle called Sprout, and this was also employed on The Meg for the underwater coral.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The Meg marked the return of noted producer Gerald R. Molen to Hollywood filmmaking.
44 of 72 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Adrian De Wet stated "The creature is described in the books as looking like a huge albino great white, And while it makes evolutionary sense for it to have ended up albino and blind after countless millennia in the total darkness of 10km deep, Jon Turteltaub felt that that didn't work for his vision. Instead he wanted it to look gnarled, textured, aggressive, moody, and dark, most definitely not a great white."
5 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The scene with the giant squid could be referencing The Beast, a novel written by Peter Benchley, who also wrote Jaws (1975).
21 of 39 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The megalodon might be gigantic and has too thick of a hide for the bullets to pierce, but it's still startled and backs off when shot.
20 of 42 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Actresses Li Bingbing and Ruby Rose both appeared in films from the "Resident Evil" franchise. Li appeared in Resident Evil: Retribution (2012) and Rose appeared in Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (2016).
34 of 79 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Featured on Episode #196 on the podcast "How Did This Get Made?".
26 of 69 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ólafur Darri Ólafsson plays a character named "The Wall". Earlier, in True Detective (2014), he played a character named Dewall.
13 of 34 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Production Design was done by Grant Major, who is famous for his work on The Lord of the Rings Trilogy.
12 of 35 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
To enable Imageworks to turn around so many shots for the third act so quickly, Sue Rowe employed several new methods. The first was to rely on Maya's Viewport 2.0 to work on high-quality but still early versions of the shots directly in the viewport without the need to render. "The reason I really liked it is that it was super fast," states Rowe. "You can add fog as depth and you can put spotlights in. You see, when you distill everything down that you need for an underwater movie, it's pretty much about bubbles and particulates."
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Rainn Wilson was in House of 1000 Corpses, playing a character called "Fishboy".
16 of 54 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
"If you build your skeleton accurately, that's the starting point. The system the guys have written will then make the muscles and skin move in the correct way so you don't have any intersections and it won't fold in on itself. What was interesting was, it's also flexible. So if I wanted to have the shoulder of the shark shudder, but in a really extreme way, we could push it to that if we wanted. That meant Imageworks had to re-do several of its original bubble and cavitation simulations. Rowe thinks the ultimate result was much more engaging. "This is what I always say to people who start out in the industry, the computer might solve it in a certain way, but if it doesn't look how the director ultimately wants it to look, then we just have to make sure it fits into the movie."
3 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Jason Statham plays a character called Jonas Taylor. Jason is an anagram of Jonas. This is a coincidence, as the name comes from the novel, which was written nearly 20 years before Statham was considered for the role.
21 of 88 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Rainn Wilson and Page Kennedy also both starred in Backstrom (2015).
16 of 104 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The movie was considered an early favorite for the Golden Raspberry Awards (also known as the 'Razzies' or 'Anti-Oscars'), including Worst Picture, but was only nominated for Worst Remake, Rip-Off or Sequel. The organization attributed this to an error that may have influenced the voting. Normally, only paying members of the Raspberry Award Foundation can vote for the films to be nominated, but due to a technical glitch, non-paying visitors on the website were also enabled to cast their votes.
2 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Both, Rainn Wilson and Bingbing Li, have appeared in Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (2009) and Transformers: Age of Extinction (2014), respectively.
7 of 40 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The two whales introduced early in the movie are named Lucy and Gracie. Their names are likely references to the 20th-century comediennes Lucille Ball (aka Lucy) and Gracie Allen.
2 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Production VFX Supervisor Adrian De Wet spent months with teams of effects artists refining the shape and proportions of the Meg.
1 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The idea that was employed for shark was, adds Sue Rowe, "if you ever look at a thoroughbred horse and how their muscle shakes, it ripples down their body. And from that you know that this is a really muscular, powerful character. So we said, let's do the same for the Meg. You'll see a little twitch in the muscle or the gills. We definitely amplified those things using Ziva."
1 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Imageworks had been able to craft a realistic shark and a realistic underwater environment, but there was still another element that was needed to help sell the shots: bubbles. More specifically, it was the cavitation of bubbles around submarines, propellers, and even the Meg itself.
1 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The animators built multiple types of coral, different types of rock and sand, and had some fish in there as well. And then clustered them altogether and covered it in coral with Sprout.
1 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Visual effects studios are constantly being asked to deliver more shots more quickly than ever before. It can be a major challenge to get effects out the door for review, work to final them, and then deal with inevitable changes. Which is why Sony Pictures Imageworks Visual Effects Supervisor Sue Rowe decided to tackle things slightly differently when she took on the challenge of helping to craft the third act of The Meg.
1 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Sue Rowe explained about The final frames, "This is what I always say to people who start out in the industry, the computer might solve it in a certain way, but if it doesn't look how the director ultimately wants it to look, then we just have to make sure it fits into the movie."
1 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
"When the Production Supervisor Adrian De Wet and Visual Effects Producer Steve Garrad came to us, they knew this third act was going to be tricky because story points in the climax of a film are always developing, and they knew they would need a really powerful engine behind them to get that work done," Sue Rowe tells VFX Voice. "So the deal we entered into at the beginning was, 'Hey, we're going to give you perhaps 400 shots, and we want you to turn them around really fast and then give them to editorial, and then we're going to hone it down from there.'"
0 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Imageworks provided quick versions of the shots using Viewport 2.0 to get sign-off before continuing.
0 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Water cavitation effects played a big role, in selling the final shots.
0 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Sue Rowe and her team looked at a multitude of cavitation reference (cavitation actually occurs when the propellers cause the water to boil and get ejected out the back). Noticing that the cavitation trail tends to be quite elongated, this was how Imageworks originally approached simulations in Houdini. However, at some point, notes Rowe, "the director saw a few shots where the cavitation actually rose up, rather than shoot out straight. He really liked this look, even though it wasn't necessarily physically correct."
0 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Similarly, there were moments when the filmmakers felt that some underwater shots were still missing something. Sue Rowe realized the 'secret source' were things she called 'streams', bubbles that matched the tail movement of the Meg, or even crept out of the creature's nose. "It just created this slight sense of movement underwater that we really needed," says Rowe. "I remember sitting in dailies and going, 'Give me more bubbles, give me more, more, more, more bubbles!'"
0 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Just before the Meg attacks Suyin in the plastic shark cage, you can hear a fast paced version of the cello theme music from Jaws (1975).
158 of 162 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In the book, Jonas kills the Meg by driving down its throat and landing in its belly, then ripping out the its heart from within. In the movie, Jonas slashes the Meg across the belly and lets hundreds of sharks devour it.
133 of 140 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The scene where Jonas realizes from the Meg's bite pattern that it's too small to be the one that left the teeth-marks on the station is a nod to Hooper's similar realization about the tiger shark in Jaws (1975).
82 of 86 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
At the end when the shark is killed the same sound effect is heard that was used in the original Jaws (1975) when the shark was killed and also in the movie Duel (both directed by Steven Spielberg) when the truck goes over the cliff.
66 of 73 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In the book, the Meg gives birth to three pups, two of which die. The lone survivor, Angel, would be the poster child for the next "Meg" books. In the film, a baby shark is seen escaping the dead sharks mouth, presumably the offspring.
116 of 134 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The megalodon is relatively docile while swimming near the beach full of people, seeming more curious than anything. Then everyone sees it and panics. That many creatures making movements like prey in distress promptly causes it to go completely berserk and enter a feeding frenzy, as a real shark would. It's noticeably more aggressive and erratic during the following final confrontation than it has been for the rest of the movie.
58 of 67 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The megalodon consistently ignores smaller prey if larger prey is readily available and primarily attacks what is making the most noise or emitting the most light at any given time. This includes completely ignoring the small dog in the water in favor of the large, noisy, splashing crowd of people nearby, as would be expected of a real life predator. The exception to this is when it's enraged or driven into a feeding frenzy.
28 of 33 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The megalodon counts as non-malicious, since it doesn't specifically target humans over other prey, being shown to devour giant squids and whales at other points in the film; they just happen to be available once it reaches the surface and a few times it only kills people seemingly by accident. It actually only attacks the beach-goers when they panic and begin causing a lot of movement and activity, which causes it to go berserk. Near the end, a recording of whalesong is enough to get it to leave a crowded beach alone, although it had already killed several people by then.
39 of 49 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The first Meg dies in a similar way to the shark in the original book Jaws (which was changed for the film version of Jaws (1975)). As it's going after Brody in the water, it suddenly succumbs to the injuries inflicted on it by the Orca crew. It dies and sinks into the depths. In The Meg, as the first shark is going after Jonas and Suyin, it dies from the poison injected into it and sinks into the depths.
38 of 49 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
As regards her role, Suyin is roughly comparable to Tanaka's son DJ in the novel; she doesn't believe Jonas about the truth of the Meg and proves in over her head on the ocean floor. Here she survives and lives all the way to the end.
15 of 19 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Heller's dislike of Jonas in the earlier part of the film parallels the novel - unsurprisingly given he thinks Jonas caused the deaths of his friends and the outlandishness of his story. Unlike the book's Heller however, who remains hostile to Jonas throughout, the film's version apologises outright to Jonas once the truth of the matter becomes apparent, becomes a vital member of the team hunting the Meg and performs a Heroic Sacrifice to save Jaxx, attracting the Meg to eat him so she has time to reach safety.
20 of 28 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The effects team built a Meg buck for use underwater when Jonas interacts with it. For instance, for the beats where Jonas stabs the Meg in the eye, a physical, life-sized replica of the Meg's face, or at least the part that Jason Statham has to hold onto and climb up. So when the animators locked down the design of the Meg, they went to a fabricator and they made a full-sized half face. However, they soon discovered that it could not be pulled around underwater at any considerable speed because of the massive water resistance and drag forces involved.
7 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Poisoning the first meg doesn't instantly kill it; rather, it takes several minutes during which it's still incredibly dangerous and now enraged.
24 of 59 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page


Recently Viewed