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Posh People: Inside Tatler 

Documentary which goes behind the scenes at Tatler, the world's oldest magazine, which has been reporting on the lives of Britain's most privileged and powerful for 300 years.
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1   Unknown  
2014  

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Laurence Fox ...  Himself - Narrator 3 episodes, 2014
Kate Reardon Kate Reardon ...  Herself 3 episodes, 2014
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Storyline

Posh People: Inside Tatler - Episode 1 Tatler is the oldest magazine in the world and has been reporting on the lives of Britain's most privileged and powerful for 300 years. Tatler not only documents but also dictates the social calendar of Britain's elite. With an archive full of society's movers and shakers, being pictured in its pages has long been a rite of passage for Britain's ruling classes. We meet the editor, Kate Reardon, a self-confessed 'honking, great Sloane', and her features team, who are all expected to be well-versed in the rules of upper-class life. We follow the newest addition to the Tatler team, writer Mathew Bell, over his first few months at the magazine as he tries to find his feet and go from middle-class outsider to privileged insider. We see the team put together an issue, and follow them on shoots and key social events to meet the people featured in their pages, such as Lord Glasgow in his 13th-century castle in Scotland or Nigerian millionaire Kola Karim,...

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Documentary

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Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

24 November 2014 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Tatler: 300 år av engelsk överklass See more »

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Color
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User Reviews

 
Pointless Documentary About a Vanishing Breed
19 January 2015 | by l_rawjalaurenceSee all my reviews

In 1956 Nancy Mitford published an edited collection of essays under the umbrella title NOBLESSE OBLIGE - AN ENQUIRY INTO THE IDENTIFIABLE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE English ARISTOCRACY. The contributors, including Mitford herself, Evelyn Waugh, Alan Ross and John Betjeman, offered an analysis of how one could distinguish the true blue-blood from the pretender, the true upper-class person from the nouveau riche. The book coined the now-famous distinction between "U" and "non-U" behavior; "U" standing for upper-class, and "non-U" for non-upper class (obviously).

Viewed from the perspective of nearly six decades, the book seems an anachronism, a bid to recall the days when England had an established social class-system and the landed gentry lived a life of leisure; the kind of life recalled in Waugh's BRIDESHEAD REVISITED (1945).

Bearing this knowledge in mind, it seems surprising that anyone would really be interested in making a series such as POSH PEOPLE. Ostensibly designed to provide a candid look at life behind the scenes in THE TATLER, a magazine with a circulation of just over 300,000 that caters to what remains of the aristocracy (as well as the would-be members of that class), this three-part documentary series actually ends up making the protagonists look absurd. The editor and her staff insist that they are not upper-class, but simply members of the "working-class" - whatever that means - but their cut-glass accents and impeccable public (i.e. private) school education belies their true origins. The series merely rehearses familiar arguments that reveal the lingering English obsession with class; despite the fact that social distinctions no longer really exist (at least, those based on status rather than money), people insist on defining themselves as upper, middle, or working class, and use such adjectives as "posh" to describe those they believe are socially superior to them. What does "posh" mean, exactly? The program doesn't even begin to define the term.

What we are left with in this series is the sight of ordinary people going about their legitimate business of publishing a magazine, while claiming quite falsely to be socially superior than their colleagues at other style magazines. A spurious enterprise if ever there was one.


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