Speciesism: The Movie (2013) Poster

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10/10
Mark Devries is 26 now but made the movie in college when he was ages 21 - 23.
repvegan29 September 2013
I attended the West Coast Premiere of Speciesism on September 26th, 2013 and was blown away by the documentary. Mark Devries is 26 now but made the movie in college when he was ages 21 - 23. He was not vegan when he set out to answer the questions that he poses in the beginning of the film. Speciesism is one average college kid's quest to uncovering what "Speciesism" actually is, who accepts it and who denies it, and how the majority of society can deny it if it is true? In order to answer these questions, he interviews a plethora of professionals and individuals from all walks of life and various disciplines. From philosophers to biologists to animal advocates to farmers to citizens affected by the environmental effects of factory farming, Mark doesn't leave any stone unturned in his quest.

Mark accomplishes his goals while being witty and entertaining. He employs ironic comparison but always lets the viewer decide the truth for him or herself. It is not suggestive, pushy or biased, and he never gives his explicit views. It is more like his personal diary as he went around the country seeking questions to these answers, and the journey he found himself on along the way. I only found out that Mark is now a vegan because he was asked during the Q&A portion of the Premiere, not because he ever says it in the film.

My favorite part of Speciesism is that Mark is respectful in his approach instead of being confrontational. There are no gruesome animal slaughter scenes (a few scenes of "common acceptable industry practices" but they are short and you can close your eyes). Those scenes are by no means the focus of the documentary.

The fact that Mark was able to accomplish this goal in this way makes the possibilities for the future endless and exciting. College kids, high school kids, and middle school kids will all relate very well to the style, presentation, and message of Speciesism. I asked Mark if he plans to bring this documentary onto University campuses for this reason. I did not quote him but he said that of course he plans to. He believes that college age adults especially, because they are away from home and molding their personalities, beliefs, morals, etc. (it isn't a coincidence Mark was in college when he made the documentary) will relate well to Speciesism and will be affected positively be it's message.

Children and adolescents deserve to be empowered to know the truth about their food and to make choices for themselves from a very young age. Eating animals should be explained very clearly to them so they can make a clear choice. Some parents now don't want their kids to know that "chicken nuggets" were once alive or exactly what they are, because most children have the capacity to understand that eating a live creature is wrong and most decide they don't want to do it.

It isn't until culture and habit habituate us into believing consuming animal products in natural, normal, and necessary that we separate ourselves from what we are actually doing. The world is awakening to species ism, just as the world awoke to truths like racism and sexism in the snap of a finger.

There are comparisons made between the biases humans use to make distinctions on whom is deserving of being within the bounds of ethics and morals, and whom the laws serve to protect. In the days of the slave trade, it was decided by skin color. During the Holocaust, it was decided by religion. Throughout history, women have been oppressed based on their gender. We can intellectually understand why judging who deserves fair treatment and rights based on arbitrary distinctions is problematic, yet we haven't yet extended this logic to animals as a society. Nowadays, we have decided to draw the line of who deserves to be within the bounds of ethics and morality based on what species a creatures fall into and how it's exploitation benefits us in some way (although I would argue there is zero benefit to anyone). This is called species ism.

When our society decides that certain members of society are outside the bounds of ethics, the laws of that society can never protect both parties (the in and the out group). It is interesting because Mark asks numerous strangers in the street if they would have been abolitionists in the time of slavery (when arbitrary distinctions were made not much differently than they are today) or if they would go along with the status quo and what is right and what is wrong. Of course, everyone wants to believe they would have been an abolitionist in those days. When your grand children ask you if you were a Speciesist or if you stuck up for the individual rights of all animals, regardless of species division by choosing to live vegan, what will you say?
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10/10
Amazing and inspiring documentary
gina-tomaselli29 October 2013
I will keep this short. I'll be blunt - I was very hesitant at first about watching this film, as I did not want to see yet another depressing movie about factory farming. This was totally different. Instead of feeling depressed, I left feeling inspired emotionally and intellectually. I don't think anything like this has been done before -- it is a must see for vegetarians and omnivores, alike and anyone interested in philosophy, social justice, nutrition, medicine, and just about anything else! It is heartfelt, poignant, even funny at points, raw, and both sad and uplifting. I went home and immediately ordered 3 DVD copies. See it today - you won't regret it.
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10/10
Great Documentary!
natascha-knowlton22 November 2013
Mark Devries did a fantastic job in this documentary. I've seen numerous animal rights documentaries, and this one was quite different. From the beginning he takes the view of everyday people who are hesitant to believe the horrors that happen to animals, or who refuse to grasp it, and then he talks to multiple scholars in the field who persuade you throughout the movie that what is happening is wrong. I've been vegan for many years, and parts of this movie continues to pop into my head everyday. This movie has reinforced the feelings I already had and I am even more outraged that the majority of the world continues to see animals as machines for human use. I think it was great, and I plan on showing this movie to many in my community. I hope it has an everlasting impact on how people perceive and treat non-human animals.
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10/10
A sincere and probing exploration of how the food industry treats non-human animals and how we all treat/consider members of other species.
susanloucks29 November 2013
This movie has an authenticity that makes it very powerful. The narrator seems sincere and we follow his curiosity to places we would not ordinarily see and then to issues we would not ordinarily consider. We travel with him to factory farms and then to question philosophers, academics, and ordinary people about many aspects of THE social justice issue of our time. There are dark moments and funny moments on a journey to learn for ourselves about factory farms and how we as a society treat non-human animals. Specisism is a well-crafted, thoughtful and inspirational documentary. If you eat, you should see it.
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10/10
Extremely moving, though provoking and unassuming film.
lisa-maria-883-58257029 December 2013
I would recommend watching this documentary to anyone. It's an hour and a half out of your time, but in my humble view, it will change your outlook for ever.

Mark Devries really hits the nail on the head with Speciesism. He is not confrontational nor condescending. This endears you to him from the first and therefore you are more open to the findings of the documentary as you feel as if he also is on the road to these discoveries.

And these discoveries, which are so undisputable, will force you to think and force you to assess the way we are doing things. This is what a successful documentary should make you do and in this way it is a very successful documentary.
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10/10
Simple Brilliant...Truth For All Animals Sake
diannerochenski20 November 2013
I'm a vegan because I love all animals. I'm also a peaceful animal rights activist. This movie is simple but brilliant! I won't go into detail as I don't want to be a spoiler, but I cannot emphasize enough that this is a must see movie. After watching it you will know the truth , because this movie 'is' the truth. And for those of you who 'truly' love animals but did not know about farm animals suffering this movie will educate you so you can change in order not to contribute to their misery any longer. This movie would be great in schools for children over 13 years old to educate them in compassion. Again, I absolutely love this movie. Thank you Mark for making this truly wonderful movie that is a true gift to all suffering animals and the people out there who love them.
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10/10
Thought-provoking not preachy
breyer-470-17640010 November 2013
If you go to Speciesism expecting to be hit over the head with the message to go vegan - whether you're a staunch carnivore uninterested in changing your views or a staunch vegan looking for someone to share a soapbox with - you're going to be disappointed. This film is a thoughtful exploration of one person's unexpected - and sometimes even reluctant - journey through one of the most complex moral questions facing our planet.

Director Mark Devries does a truly remarkable job of navigating these issues through his own observations as well as a wide-ranging series of interviews. Devries asks some tough questions but he is never presumptuous or demeaning, to either his interviewees or the audience. He gives everyone the space to think through their own positions themselves.
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10/10
Best Movie On This Topic That I Have Seen!
triplejoy8 December 2013
This is an EXCELLENT, must see movie! I highly recommend everyone watch it. The treatment of animals is the biggest social justice issue of our time, and this movie helps the viewer challenge his / her conventional wisdom in a gentle and humble yet very convincing and thought provoking way. There is no blood and minimal graphic content. Rather than using a lot of shocking footage, the director conveys information via interviews with experts in the field as well as with everyday people. I think anyone would be hard pressed not to reevaluate the way they view and use animals in everyday life after watching this movie. This is a very compelling movie that will challenge you to change your paradigm.
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8/10
Need more like this
sulango-605-53912429 December 2013
I have worked with non-human animals for over 35 years. I KNOW they all have emotional and intellectual capabilities similar to humans. This film will help to educate those who only think their family pets deserve to live free and treated with compassion and love. I think this movie answers questions humans need to be asking about why we treat our pets different than other animals who feel and think the same.

It will take many years but this film will help change our culture of eating and harming non- human animals to where in time it will be seen as barbaric.

I thank the maker of this movie for his incredible dedication and hard work to add a voice for the voiceless. A MUST see movie if you want to be informed and become a more compassionate human.
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10/10
This movie will surprise you, in a good way.
parrot15724 November 2013
Warning: Spoilers
Just watched Speciesism: The Movie and I would like to say that this movie is very well done! I hope I don't spoil it but would like to critic it. It had lots of top notch appearances and commentary by all the greats, including Gary L. Francione: The Abolitionist Approach to Animal Rights, Ingrid Newkirk founder of PETA, Mercy for Animals founder, Nathan Rungle, Compassion over Killing investigators and an ALF ex con. This movie covers all the lame excuses out there and does it well. Mark visits some "humane" farms, most of which he could not get close to, but the one or two are happy to oblige and tells it all. Don't worry, this movie has no real gore. I was a little nervous that I may be exposed to something terrible, but it was pretty tame and the worst part was preparing a dead pig for a BBQ. Don't let fear keep you from this movie, you will rob yourself! Mark interviews a Jewish leader at Simon Wiesenthal Center where he talks about the similarities of the holocaust in Germany to that in factory farms. One of my favorite parts. He even talks with The American Nazi Party member, in full garb. When he gets to the part where he says he sees everything differently now, I was right there with him all the way, echoing his every word. No stone was left unturned and all bases are covered though I thought there could have been more mention on the health benefits of the vegan diet, but this movie wasn't about human health, thank goodness. Mark reminds me of my youngest son, Chris, very smart, but not the intellectual type. Don't underestimate this man, he is a genius in his ability to expose people's ridiculous reasoning. He has an innocence about him and he will constantly surprise you in how he manages to make people sound...stupid...by letting them just talk. This is the essence of the movie. He lets the people that try to justify speciesism, make his case. This is a must see and must share movie. I am going to try to get my entire family to watch this movie. My recommendation is...BUY IT.
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8/10
Very unassuming, thought provoking and inspiring
Ed-791-4524054 December 2013
Very unassuming and thought provoking at the same time, expose of of how a great majority of humans have decided that they can do whatever they please with our planet and other living beings for their comfort.

However, at the same time, it was inspiring that as depicted in the film, some humans actually understand that all beings must share all that the universe has to offer, and be caretakers of each other and the universe.

Unfortunately, I cannot determine how to get many members of my species to even consider watching a film on this topic. Therein lies my and many others problem to get more humans to truly share all that the universe has to offer, and be caretakers of each other and the universe.
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10/10
Extraordinary work
mariamcmacken28 December 2013
This documentary is excellent. Marc DeVries brings about an extremely important topic with such grace, perspective and intelligence that it blows one's mind. It's amazing how he can treat such a thought-provoking subject with diligence and respect. The documentary deals with moral principles, that most people don't often consider, but that speak of integrity to our values as a society, personal and social prejudice, of the arbitrary and cruel classification of other animals in our world as objects, as commodities for our own use, gluttony and exploitation. It is not too late for us to face up to this deplorable behavior and do something about it!
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10/10
Excellent
ferdinanda11 December 2013
Loved the style of this doc film. Devries is so funny and clever in his delivery of the subject. His seemingly unbiased approach was refreshing especially after seeing other recently released animal rights movies. Laughed at his obviously intentional selection of overweight interviewees! Totally related to the tattooed vegan driving and ranting. Glad to know I am not alone. The reviews are all accurate ...Showed film to kids ages 8-16 and to a 81 yr old, all appreciated the quite intelligent film making. He stays on subject of farm animals but one could easily infer to all animals. I would have appreciated his interviewing more people from different age groups and cultures however. This movie could easily augment an ethics, philosophy, or psychology class. Should be up for academy award.
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10/10
Awesome, one of the best movies I have seen in a long time, makes you think.
atc_marty7 December 2013
Informative, emotional, educational and most of all, inspiring.

A great movie for the activist, the animal lover or the person who wants to rethink whether their lives are based on a cruelty.

I feel it will be as important as the movie " Earthlings " in changing people's perception of the food they eat.

The documentary not only highlights the current movement towards plant-based diets, but also the personal journey of the writer and director on his own journey, to vegan and investigating factory farms and their secrets.

Great interviews with PETA activists, Peter Singer and many others that have been involved with the movement of better welfare for animals.

It shows enough of factory farming to show you whats going on, with the shock and awe that a lot of other movies in this genre do. A great mix of reality style, on the street interviews and big budget movie style footage. For a first time film writer, director and film maker, it couldn't of been done better.

I would recommend it to anybody who thinks for themselves, loves animals or just wants to know more about why we eat animals.

A movie well done.
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10/10
Both entertaining and mind-opening
adolcich31 December 2013
Warning: Spoilers
I showed this movie to a class I teach at a large Midwestern university; for a semester students study various ways to think about nature and the environment from philosophical, ethical and religious perspectives. The students loved this film: it was entertaining (laid back, humorous, engaging) yet also mind-opening (without being pedantic). They very much enjoyed learning from Devries, who (age 22 in the film) is more or less their peer. Devries models the famous Socratic method well known for its pursuit of answers to very basic questions which, when looked at closely, reveal complex truths and sometimes competing claims which demand sorting out. A question like 'why do we think in certain ways about animals?' leads Devries on a journey uncovering often-disturbing, sometimes-inspiring facts about the human relationship with animals on a basic level of survival. It goes to show that the question 'what's for dinner' is very complicated indeed. I would say that all of my students were entertained by the film, and most were challenged in a positive way (whether or not they agreed with Devries' own conclusions).
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10/10
Compelling, logical, eye-opening
caitlin_shipp27 May 2014
This documentary breaks down the issues surrounding animal rights to a form so simple and logical that they can no longer be denied! In an incredibly easy-to-relate manner, this documentary leaves no stone (ie anti-animal rights argument) unturned and leaves the viewer with thousands of questions, and the burning desire to break free from the speciesist society that we live in.

This documentary is appropriate for all people across the animal-rights spectrum, from a long-time vegan, to curious vegetarians, to die-hard butchers and carnivorous... everyone will gain something from watching this film!

It's not at all preachy, just logical and fact based, with next to no scenes of animal cruelty. I can't recommend this documentary enough!!
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10/10
I don't always say a documentary is a must-see, but when I do, it's this one.
TwilitWave8 May 2014
Quite possibly the best documentary I've ever seen. It starts out slow and eases you into the situation, then throws you for a loop with extremely insightful commentary and information to make you think.

I wish I could have seen this movie years ago, as it most certainly would have kick-started my move to a more compassionate lifestyle.

It's nice to see a film like this take the high road in approaching the subject from a philosophical vantage point rather than the typical shock factor approach.

I think (and hope) it has the potential for opening up the much needed conversation about animal rights and ethics in general.
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10/10
Brilliant!
drayburn4818 April 2014
This is what I have been waiting for! Mark did an outstanding job of showing the world that there is no intelligent argument in favor of the brutality we are inflicting on other beings sharing this planet with us. This movie/documentary speaks to the intellectual and ethical side of the argument that leaves no question that what we are doing is wrong on so many levels. Mark does a wonderful job of interviewing people, searching for answers, questioning all aspects of this controversial subject. He adds some humor that catches you off guard and keeps you watching this film. There is no counter argument in favor of the way we are treating non human beings. I bought the film today because I liked it so much and plan on buying more to get the word out. This is a holocaust (it cannot be described any other way)that these animals are going through. Thank you Mark for all your hard work. I support this movie all the way and will try to get as many people to watch it as I can. There is no excuse for apathy anymore. We can not even watch what these animals must endure with their bodies and for that alone we should be ashamed to be human and not do anything to stop it. As long as we sit by and let this happen, we are a part of it. People need to wake up. Humans thought slavery was OK because the people being enslaved were "different" and were considered "less" human and it had been happening for so many years that it had to be OK and many people fought violently against change. Many people stood by when the holocaust was happening and turned their heads to the suffering or worse, they participated in it. It is not surprising that we as humans can turn our heads to the suffering of animals when we actively participated in atrocities committed against other humans. This movie is like an alarm going off. Our environment cannot take much more abuse just as our health/sickness in this country is so alarming. The man on his death bed in his home spoke about it so eloquently. It was very sad to see him struggling because of the pollution that he was exposed to for so many years, but he got his message across. And last, as Marks Father described his pain without any escape from it, I can only imagine the animals that live out their entire lives in pain and fear.....knowing that no one is coming for them....they are forgotten.
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10/10
Great documentary
angsaari086 January 2014
Warning: Spoilers
Speciesism: The Movie is a great documentary! Very thought-provoking and really calls into question what may have been your beliefs your entire life. Mark Devries does an excellent job interviewing everyday people, as well as people involved in the animal rights world. The film doesn't show images that are overly graphic, it's something everyone can watch. Yet, some of the footage from the factory farms and surrounding areas was shocking. Especially the lagoons, the lagoons are appalling. I think I may have heard about the factory farm waste before, but to see the actual lagoons was eye-opening. Overall, this is a very educational film and I hope this movie is seen far and wide. I plan on buying multiple DVD's to give away to family and friends.
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9/10
Watch this NOW!!
Elizabethelfkid3 January 2014
Watch this movie now. Make sure your kids watch it, let the schools view it. Ghandi said you can judge a nation by the way they treat their animals.....this movie pushes all the buttons and pushes you out of your comfort zone. It asks uncomfortable questions and garner answers from thinkers widely respected, no crackpots here. Don't worry about global warming - We're happily munching our way to a self-created moral and physical apocalypse. This is an important attempt to place an increasingly disconnected urban population where they can understand that a chicken is not just pale yellow pieces of flesh glad wrapped...it lives and breathes; milk does not come from bottles... it comes from a sentient female animal whose original purpose was to feed her young like human women do. It's a brave exploration of the very dangerous way we feed ourselves today.
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10/10
Great Movie
vincelees2 January 2014
This movie is well done and thought provoking without being visually shocking. The viewer is challenged to rethink our use and exploitation of animals without the usu gory footage. Im not negating the need for bloody photos. Its reproachable what happens behind closed doors in the meat/dairy industry. It takes a lot of information to alter most peoples learned assumptions. I am grateful to the brave men/women who go under cover to expose the shocking photos/videos. Every person can make a difference by just changing their eating habits….inspiring! I find it particularly helpful to watch films like Speciesism in order to challenge my concept of humanity. The interviews with industry experts and insider perspective is particularly engaging. Very compelling…a must see!
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10/10
The truth about food and how humans think of animals
Katie-em7 April 2014
Wow. What an exceptional film. I would like everyone to watch it. We should all be informed and aware of exactly what goes on behind closed doors and how it impacts on non-human animals, our health and the world around us.

In a time when racism, homophobia and sexism are frowned upon and strategies being put in place to attempt to eliminate them completely, it is about time speciesism was bought into the spotlight. Perhaps the last of the prejudices to be recognised, Mark Devries does an amazing job of bringing it to the forefront. He is intelligent, entertaining and convincing. He manages to paint a clear picture of the cruel and dangerous realities of animal farming without using the shocking and gruesome slaughter footage that many people find offensive. By avoiding such images, and refraining from "forcing" opinions and ideas onto people, all arguments and points are presented in an unbiased way. All parties are given a say and the opportunity to defend their beliefs and systems. Viewers are therefore encouraged to really think about the information they are given and come to their own conclusions.

All issues raised in this movie are done so rationally and fairly. A wide range of people are consulted, from animal activists to lifelong farmers, philosophers to everyday pedestrians on the street. Matters are addressed from all angles. An abundance of information and evidence is provided in each case. There is no way you could walk away from this film feeling dissatisfied.

I first heard about Speciesism: The Movie on Facebook. As a proud and passionate ethical vegan, I have done much research into these topics and like to think I'm reasonably well informed, but this film still managed to surprise me with many facts and arguments I was previously unaware of.

Absolutely eye-opening and enlightening, it is a must see.
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10/10
Join in a philosophical quest and get answers to questions about specieism
graves-michele6 April 2014
It's you're looking for beautiful cinematography shot by an expert filmmaker, then you're looking for "The Ghosts in Our Machine," by documentarian Liz Marshall.

Specieism, however, has merits. It's a thoroughly explored thought experiment, embarked on by philosophy major Mark Devries and friends with cameras.

While Ghosts follows the story of animal rights photographer Jo-Anne McArthur and sees the world in her perspective (that of an animal aware, species inclusive compassionate artist) Specieism is the story of a young man, Devries, arriving at that perspective in a philosophical fashion.

It's a fascinating logic quest. Devries asks himself one question and then another and another and deeply explores each, seeking insight from some of the greatest thinkers on the topics and also comparing those perspectives to the views of everyday people.

One of the most powerful parts of the film is when Devries travels to North Carolina to talk to residents there about hog farming. He begins by talking to advocates for clean streams. When told that the best way to explore a question is to fly over the farms, Devries gets into a plane. When told that he needs to talk to locals to get the real story, Devries heads out to a home beside one of the farms and talks to the people there about what it is like to live next to a hog farm.

Devries will talk to anyone about anything to get all of his questions answered and, touchingly, to get a human perspective on what it is like to live in constant pain Devries puts his own father on camera to talk about his disability and pain (something Devries said his father has never spoken with him about before).

Devries applies the Socratic method to life and seeks out teachers. There are some great interviews with Ingrid Newkirk of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, Paul Shapiro of the Humane Society of the United States, philosopher Peter Singer author of Animal Liberation, and biologist Richard Dawkins. It's a pity the film quality isn't better for these.

In contrast, the man on the street interviews serve to highlight that most people have not closely or critically examined their own views about animals.

It's fabulous to watch Devries' do so and to join him in his intellectual process. It's a great quest and, ultimately, provides persuasive, airtight reasoning. I wish I'd seen Specieism the Movie in college.
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10/10
Amazing! A must see!
bec-thorley4 April 2014
I was totally blown away by this movie. I was not sure what to expect, and came out of the movie theater feeling totally inspired.

I liked it for many reasons, but what I found refreshingly different was the approach Mark took. I think the movie was so powerful as he was not a vegetarian/vegan to begin with.

I also loved that he managed to bring in humor to a subject area that is very dark and depressing.

The movie did not contain too many graphic images, which I think was very smart, as many meat eaters would avoid this movie, based on that issue alone.

Mark also challenged people in an intellectual way which left them totally tongue tied.

This movie is sharp, intelligent and a must see.
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10/10
Brilliant please watch
I'm only gonna write a quick review, WATCH THIS FILM, it's really well done, Mark Devries has taken the right approach to this, i've been vegan for 2 years and already aware of what goes on, i want everyone to watch this this so they can understand what Speciesism is and what we are doing and taking part in without fully knowing, There is barley any hard footage to watch from factory farms as i know people find that hard to see so he has taken a good approach..it's time the world woke up :)i loved it and will be showing everyone i can get to watch it..please people watch and educate, animals are here with us not for us, well done mark.
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