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Animation Filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki to be Honored with 2019 Sklar Creative Visionary Award

  • Variety
Animation Filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki to be Honored with 2019 Sklar Creative Visionary Award
Spirited Away” creator and Academy Award winner, Hayao Miyazaki will be honored with the Sklar Creative Visionary Award at this year’s annual Ryman Arts dinner and program.

Born in Tokyo, Japan, the moviemaker’s extensive portfolio carries an impressive list of films and an equally impressive list of awards and nominations including “Howl’s Moving Castle,” “Ponyo,” and “The Wind Rises” which earned an Academy award nomination for Best Animated Feature Film in 2013. Additionally, Miyazaki was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Awards Hall of Fame and presented an honorary Oscar for Lifetime Achievement in 2014. His newest production, “How Do You Live?” will be released in 2020.

“Ryman Arts is thrilled that the legendary Hayao Miyazaki will be the next recipient of the Sklar Creative Visionary Award. His incredible work has advanced the art of visual storytelling and influenced the entire genre of animation, while inspiring us all,” said Ryman
See full article at Variety »

Studio Ghibli Dominates China as First ‘Spirited Away’ Screenings Outgross ‘Toy Story 4’

Studio Ghibli Dominates China as First ‘Spirited Away’ Screenings Outgross ‘Toy Story 4’
Hayao Miyazaki’s Oscar winner “Spirited Away” may be 18 years old, but that didn’t stop it from dominating the China box office over the June 21-23 weekend. The 2001 animated adventure film opened for the first time in Chinese movie theaters to a massive $28 million haul (via Variety), over double the $13.2 million Disney/Pixar made with the opening of the highly-anticipated “Toy Story 4.” That a new Pixar outing was dominated by a nearly two-decade old Miyazaki film speaks to Studio’s Ghibli’s widespread popularity in China.

Miyazaki’s 1988 fantasy film “My Neighbor Totoro” was the first Studio Ghibli movie to receive a theatrical release in China when it debuted in theaters last December. The film made $13 million on its opening weekend and ended its run with $26 million. The “Spirited Away” opening in China managed to outgross the entire run of “Totoro,” another remarkable feat for Studio Ghibli.

Spirited Away
See full article at Indiewire »

Miyazaki’s ‘Spirited Away’ to Finally Open in China After 18 Years, Eyes Anime Box Office Record

Miyazaki’s ‘Spirited Away’ to Finally Open in China After 18 Years, Eyes Anime Box Office Record
Hayao Miyazaki’s beloved anime adventure “Spirited Away” has finally landed a Chinese theatrical release for the first time since opening around the world in 2001 (via Yahoo). Eighteen years later, “Spirited Away” remains one of Miyazaki’s most critically acclaimed directorial efforts and the highest grossing film at the Japanese box office. The anime grossed over $275 million in Japan during its initial release, out-grossing such box office behemoths as James Cameron’s “Titanic.” “Spirited Away” won the Oscar for Best Animated Feature at the 75th Academy Awards in 2003.

With “Spirited Away” finally opening in Chinese theaters, the title now has the chance to reclaim its position as the highest grossing anime film ever released. The Miyazaki movie held the title for over a decade until Makoto Shinkai’s “Your Name” surpassed it in 2017 with a global gross of $357 million. Anime has long been popular with Chinese audiences and $83 million of
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Okko’s Inn’ Trailer: GKids Offers Ghost Tale from Studio Ghibli Animator Kitaro Kōsaka

‘Okko’s Inn’ Trailer: GKids Offers Ghost Tale from Studio Ghibli Animator Kitaro Kōsaka
The trailer for “Okko’s Inn,” the next animated release from GKids, offers a glimpse of such familiar anime tropes as friendly spirits, floating characters, and a wide-eyed young girl’s emotional awakening.

Former Studio Ghibli animator Kitaro Kōsaka directs this enticing, inclusionary ghost story at Studio Madhouse, opening April 22nd and 23rd in select theaters. Kōsaka, one of Hayao Miyazaki’s most talented disciples, offers a twist on ghosts and floating characters wrapped around the hospitality industry.

Read More: GKids Picks Up Animated Survival Drama ‘Funan’ for Spring Release

After her parents are killed in a car accident, Okko stays with her grandmother, an innkeeper, on top of an ancient spring with healing powers. There, Okko encounters friendly spirits that only she can see, who play games, teach her about selflessness, and groom her to become the new caretaker.

“I wanted to depict a girl, at a self-conscious and impressionable age,
See full article at Indiewire »

Film Review: ‘Never-Ending Man: Hayao Miyazaki’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘Never-Ending Man: Hayao Miyazaki’
Hayao Miyazaki has threatened to quit before, so you can’t blame the “Spirited Away” director’s fans for being just a wee bit skeptical when Miyazaki announced in September 2013 that “The Wind Rises” would be his final feature. “But… this time… I mean it,” he insisted at a crowded press conference, unable to keep a straight face as the words left his lips — as if the person he was most trying to convince was himself.

Certainly, documentary filmmaker Kaku Arakawa had his doubts that Studio Ghibli — the anime company Miyazaki co-founded with director Isao Takahata — was gone for good, even though it had officially dismissed its hundreds of employees and now sat empty. Over the previous decade, Arakawa had visited the studio on various occasions to shoot TV reports, establishing a rapport that served as the excuse to check in with the director at his personal atelier in early
See full article at Variety »

Grey’s Anatomy Season 15 Is Bringing On A New Female Character After The Winter Break

  • OnTheFlix
Happy Thursday, Grey's Anatomy fans. Finally, some more news has broke regarding the current season 15 of your favorite show which is currently on a long, winter break hiatus. It turns out that they are going to bring an older, more mature lady into the mix at some point after the winter break is over. According to the folks over at TV Line.com , The Grey's Anatomy production crew has hired former Dirty Dancing actress Jennifer Grey to come on and play an assumed short story arc. Unfortunately, the ABC rep that TVLine spoke to refused to reveal any other details about Jennifer Grey's new role. So, we don't have a name for her character or what she'll be up to when she arrives. However, that has not stopped people from heavily speculating on who her character is. It's highly speculated that she could play character Jo Wilson's estranged mother.
See full article at OnTheFlix »

‘Never-Ending Man: Hayao Miyazaki’ Review: A Fun Portrait of a Miserable Retiree

  • Indiewire
‘Never-Ending Man: Hayao Miyazaki’ Review: A Fun Portrait of a Miserable Retiree
Here is just a tiny sample of the many different ways that Hayao Miyazaki — arguably the greatest animator the cinema has ever seen — describes himself in Kaku Arakawa’s documentary about the artist’s life since his most recent attempt to retire: “I’m an old geezer.” “I’m used up.” And, at the 2013 press conference where he publicly declared that his beloved Studio Ghibli would no longer be in the business of making feature-length films: “I’ve decided to treat any desire to continue as the delusions of an old man.”

As anyone who’s seen Mami Sunada’s extraordinary “The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness” already knows, Miyazaki can be kind of a buzzkill. And here, in “Never-Ending Man: Hayao Miyazaki,” the creator of profoundly vital movies like “My Neighbor Totoro” and “Spirited Away” is full-on goth.

Originally aired on Nhk World TV in 2016, and now being released in U.
See full article at Indiewire »

Hayao Miyazaki’s new film still “three or four years” away from release

Last year it was reported that animation house Studio Ghibli has reopened its doors as legendary filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki came out of retirement once again for a new anime feature, titled How Do You Live?.

Initial reports suggested that Miyazaki was hoping to have the film completed and ready for release to coincide with the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo, Japan.

However, it appears that date may have been a little ambitious, as producer Toshio Suzuki has revealed to Anime News Network that the film is “about three or four years” away from release, and that Miyazaki has already been in production on the project for the past two years.

How Do You Live? is taken from the title of Genzaburō Yoshino’s 1937 book Kimi-tachi wa Dō Ikiru ka, which follows a 15-year-old boy who moves in with his uncle following the death of his father, and embarks on a journey of spiritual growth.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Studio Ghibli Theme Park Sets 2020 Opening in Japan, Debuts Gorgeous First Look Concept Art

Studio Ghibli excited fans around the world when it announced last summer that a theme park based on the studio’s filmography would be opening in Japan. According to The Japan Times, the regional government has now confirmed the theme park will open in 2020. The park is being built in the Aichi Prefecture near Nagoya, where Japan hosted the 2005 World’s Fair.

The Studio Ghibli theme park is being designed as both a traditional theme park and a place where visitors can interact with nature, which is fitting for Ghibli. The Aichi government says the park will include rides and forest trails based on Hayao Miyazaki films such as “My Neighbor Totoro,” “Kiki’s Delivery Service” and “Howl’s Moving Castle.”

“The park will be dotted with the European-themed brick towers that appear frequently in Miyazaki’s works, as well as giant installations of spider and boar-shaped spirits in imaginary
See full article at Indiewire »

Pixar Oscar Winner Lee Unkrich Wants Live-Action Directors to Follow Wes Anderson’s Lead and Make Animation

With two Oscars under his belt, Pixar’s Lee Unkrich is one of the most prolific directors in animation today. The “Toy Story 3” and “Coco” director makes an appearance in Little White Lies’ March/April 2018 issue to talk about the future of animation, and one point Unkrich stresses is the desire to have more live-action filmmakers cross over to animation storytelling. Unkrich notes how effortless Wes Anderson can pivot from live-action to animation without losing his signature style, and he’d love to see other directors make a similar transition.

“I’ve actually liked seeing some traditional live-action filmmakers make steps into animation, like Wes Anderson,” Unkrich said. “I don’t think the two worlds need to be so segregated. I think the work that we’re doing in animation is very much on par with what’s being done in live-action, and the way we make the films is similar,
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars outrage: Readers were animated over the unjust Best Picture snubs for ‘The Lion King’ & ‘Spirited Away’

  • Gold Derby
Oscars outrage: Readers were animated over the unjust Best Picture snubs for ‘The Lion King’ & ‘Spirited Away’
Animated films are hardly ever nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars. Only three have accomplished the feat: “Beauty and the Beast” (1991), “Up” (2009) and “Toy Story 3” (2010). Of those only “Beauty and the Beast” ever broke through in a field of five Best Picture nominees. That means there have been many, many worthy toons that fell by the wayside, from the first ever animated feature “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” (1937) to the acclaimed Pixar film “Coco” (2017). But when we asked our readers the snubs that outraged them the most were “The Lion King” (1994) and “Spirited Away” (2002).

According to a leading 19% of respondents, “The Lion King” is the snubbed animated film that most deserved a Best Picture bid. And perhaps it came close. It won two Oscars out of four nominations for its music. Hans Zimmer won for his score, and Elton John and Tim Rice won for their original
See full article at Gold Derby »

Drawn that way by Anne-Katrin Titze

Michaël Dudok de Wit on Isao Takahata of Studio Ghibli: "He's very much into symbolism, metaphors and the subtle emotions." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The French Institute Alliance Française in New York in their latest CinéSalon series is honouring actresses who have won the César Award. Catherine Deneuve in François Truffaut's 10-César award-winning The Last Metro (Le Dernier Métro - introduced by Anne-Katrin Titze on February 13 at 4:00pm); Sandrine Bonnaire in Agnès Varda's Vagabond (Sans Toit Ni Loi), and Isabelle Huppert (Oscar-nominated for her performance) in Paul Verhoeven's Elle are the upcoming Best Actress: A César-Winner Showdown films to be shown.

Michaël Dudok de Wit with Anne-Katrin Titze on Lafcadio Hearn's Kwaidan: "It's basically fairy tales and ghost stories." Photo: Natascha Bodemann

Michaël Dudok de Wit's (César and Oscar-nominated and Cannes Film Festival Un Certain Regard Special Jury Prize winner) debut feature The Red Turtle,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Drawn that way by Anne-Katrin Titze

Michaël Dudok de Wit on Isao Takahata of Studio Ghibli: "He's very much into symbolism, metaphors and the subtle emotions." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The French Institute Alliance Française in New York in their latest CinéSalon series is honouring actresses who have won the César Award. Catherine Deneuve in François Truffaut's 10-César award-winning The Last Metro (Le Dernier Métro - introduced by Anne-Katrin Titze on February 13 at 4:00pm); Sandrine Bonnaire in Agnès Varda's Vagabond (Sans Toit Ni Loi), and Isabelle Huppert (Oscar-nominated for her performance) in Paul Verhoeven's Elle are the upcoming Best Actress: A César-Winner Showdown films to be shown.

Michaël Dudok de Wit with Anne-Katrin Titze on Lafcadio Hearn's Kwaidan: "It's basically fairy tales and ghost stories." Photo: Natascha Bodemann

Michaël Dudok de Wit's (César and Oscar-nominated and Cannes Film Festival Un Certain Regard Special Jury Prize winner) debut feature The Red Turtle,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

U.S. Trailer for ‘Mary and the Witch’s Flower’ Introduces Studio Ponoc’s First Film

Hayao Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli are back to work on a new feature film, but in the interim when it was thought that The Wind Rises may be their final outing, a handful of veterans from the studio went on to form their own company, Studio Ponoc. Their first feature is Mary and the Witch’s Flower, the latest from director Hiromasa Yonebayashi (The Secret World of Arrietty and When Marnie Was There), an adaptation of Mary Stewart’s The Little Broomstick, as scripted by the director and Riko Sakaguchi (The Tale of the Princess Kaguya). Ahead of a U.S. release in January thanks to Gkids, a new trailer has now arrived.

The story follows a young girl named Mary (Hana Sugisaki) who discovers a forbidden plant that grants her the power to become a witch for one night. Dan Schindel said in our review, “While there are plenty
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Tale of the Princess Kaguya – 'a beautiful historical fantasia'

Isao Takahata’s animated fable, eight years in the making, is a masterpiece to rank among Studio Ghibli’s finest

With The Wind Rises proving a swansong for Hayao Miyazaki, Ghibli’s 79-year-old co-founder Isao Takahata keeps the animation studio’s stock high, amid reports of closure, with what has been rumoured to be his own final film. This adaptation of the 10th-century Japanese folk tale Taketori Monogatari (which has previously inspired such cinematic adventures as Kon Ichikawa’s live-action Princess from the Moon) boasts a sketchier, more impressionistic palette than the bold strokes of Spirited Away or Howl’s Moving Castle, which made Ghibli a global brand.

It’s a world of charcoal lines and watercoloured hues; you can almost feel the brushstrokes upon fibrous paper as the proudly hand-drawn action unfolds, skittish motion drawing our attention to the old-fashioned artistry of key collaborators Osamu Tanabe and Kazuo Oga.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Wind Rises review Hayao Miyazaki's idealistic swansong

Hayao Miyazaki's final film about a Japanese flight pioneer is visually exquisite and emotionally charged

There is a wonderful gentleness and intelligent idealism to this animation by 73-year-old Hayao Miyazaki, understood to be his final work, now available here in subtitled and dubbed versions. It is a tribute to the aeronautical engineer Jiro Horikoshi, who was a pioneer in aircraft design in the first half of the twentieth century. This Horikoshi bookish and bespectacled like a Japanese Harry Potter never loses his essential boyishness, never loses the distracted look of a dreamer and an artist. His planes are visions, poems in flight. The title, Kaze Tachinu, or The Wind Rises, is an allusion to lines of Paul Valéry repeatedly cited in the movie: "The wind rises, we must try to live."

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Review: The Wind Rises Flies Into Fantasy, While Bound To Reality

Anticipation levels are always high with the release of a new Studio Ghibili movie, and even higher when the director and writer is the father of the company and man behind its best works, Miyazaki Hayao. While Miyazaki's previous two works, Howl's Moving Castle and Ponyo contained fantastical elements and were based on stories for children, The Wind Rises (aka Kaze Tachinu) is a fictionalized biography of engineer Horikoshi Jiro, who designed the Zero fighter aircraft, which was devastatingly effective in the early days of World War Two. As a result of its 1920's/30's real world setting and overtones of the coming war it is stylistically reminiscent of Takahata Isao's Grave of the Fireflies, though it's not quite as harrowing as that masterpiece. The film...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Wind Rises Movie Review

  • ShockYa
The Wind Rises Movie Review
The Wind Rises (Kaze tachinu) Walt Disney Pictures Director: Hayao Miyazaki Screenplay: Hayao Miyazaki (comic and screenplay) loosely based on the short story “The Wind Has Risen” by Tatsuo Hori Cast: Voices of: Joseph Gordon-Levitt, John Krasinski, Emily Blunt, Martin Short, Stanley Tucci, Mandy Patinkin Screened at: Regal E-Walk, NYC, 2/18/14 Opens: February 28, 2014 Ever since the legendary Icarus took flight, humankind has wanted to fly. Never mind that Icarus flew too close to the sun and fell, dooming the experiment. From the time that the Wright Brothers took off from Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, a love of aircraft became dominant throughout the 20th century for good purposes (see [ Read More ]

The post The Wind Rises Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
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71st Annual Golden Globe Awards Winners as They're Announced!

71st Annual Golden Globe Awards Winners as They're Announced!
The 71st Annual Golden Globe Awards took place tonight at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles today, with Tina Fey (30 Rock) and Golden Globe nominee Amy Poehler (Parks and Recreation) serving as hosts for the second year in a row. Take a look at the full list of Golden Globes winners below.

Best Motion Picture - Drama

- 12 Years a Slave - Plan B Entertainment, New Regency Productions and River Road Entertainment; Fox Searchlight PicturesCaptain Phillips - Columbia Pictures; Sony Pictures ReleasingGravity - Warner Bros. Pictures / Esperanto Filmoj / Heyday Films; Warner Bros. PicturesPhilomena - Pathe, BBC Films, BFI, Canal+, Cine+, Baby Cow/Magnolia Mae; The Weinstein CompanyRush - Universal Pictures, Cross Creek Pictures, Exclusive Media, Imagine Entertainment, Working Title, Revolution Films; Universal Pictures

Best Performance By An Actor In A Motion Picture - Drama

Matthew McConaughey - Dallas Buyers Club

Chiwetel Ejiofor - 12 Years a Slave

Idris Elba -
See full article at MovieWeb »

Globes: Slave, Hustle win top

Globes: Slave, Hustle win top
12 Years A Slave triumphed in the best dramatic category and American Hustle won in the comedy or musical category.Cate Blanchett, widely regarded as the frontrunner for the Oscar, was named best actress in a drama for Blue Jasmine in her third career Globe.Matthew McConaughey, also much fancied for the Academy Award, triumphed in the best dramatic actor stakes for Dallas Buyers Club in his first ever recognition by the Hollywood Foreign Press

12 Years A Slave triumphed in the best dramatic category and American Hustle won in the comedy or musical category.

Cate Blanchett, widely regarded as the frontrunner for the Oscar, was named best actress in a drama for Blue Jasmine in her third career Globe.

Matthew McConaughey, also much fancied for the Academy Award, triumphed in the best dramatic actor stakes for Dallas Buyers Club in his first ever recognition by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

Leonardo DiCaprio won his first ever Golden Globe as
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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