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Stephen King’s ‘The Dark Half’ Movie Adaptation in the Works

  • Variety
Stephen King’s ‘The Dark Half’ Movie Adaptation in the Works
Stephen King’s horror novel “The Dark Half” is getting the movie treatment at MGM with “Her Smell” director Alex Ross Perry on board to helm.

King wrote the book in 1989 about a novelist whose pseudonym comes to life as a murderous twin after his own pen name, Richard Bachman, was revealed.

MGM first adapted a film version in 1993 with zombie horror icon George Romero directing and Timothy Hutton starring. Hutton portrayed the best-selling author Thad Beaumont, who also sells grisly crime novels under the name George Stark. When the pseudonym is exposed, the author and his wife give the other author a ceremonial burial — resulting in George Stark coming alive and going on a murder spree. The movie was a box office flop, grossing $10 million from a $15 million budget.

King’s novels have been mined and mined again for Hollywood movies and TV shows, including 1976’s “Carrie,” “The Shining,
See full article at Variety »

Bastard Child of Paul Verhoeven and Axl Rose: Alex Ross Perry and "Her Smell"

  • MUBI
My first encounter with the work of Alex Ross Perry came in the fall of 2009, at a small festival of extremely low-budget and experimental movies in Chicago. Some friends, long since moved away and lost touch with, had talked me to going into the sole screening of a feature with an odd title. If memory serves, it was the only one in the program to have been shot and projected on film. The movie turned out to be Perry’s debut, Impolex, and though I dread the thought of revisiting whatever it is that I wrote about it at the time, this Thomas Pynchon-inspired surrealist comedy about a narcoleptic World War II soldier who wanders a forest in search of a V-2 rocket left a substantial impression. To be honest, it was probably just as important back then that Perry seemed like one of us. That is, video store people,
See full article at MUBI »

Alex Ross Perry To Write & Direct Feature Film Adaptation Of Stephen King’s ‘Rest Stop’

Alex Ross Perry is definitely a filmmaker that doesn’t like to be put in any sort of box. His early films were these odd, but really fun, comedies like “The Color Wheel” and “Listen Up Philip.” Perry came back with “Queen of Earth,” which is a thriller. He’s also a credited writer on the recent Disney film, “Christopher Robin.” And just last week, his punk rock musical drama “Her Smell” hit theaters.

Continue reading Alex Ross Perry To Write & Direct Feature Film Adaptation Of Stephen King’s ‘Rest Stop’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Stephen King's Rest Stop Short Story Is Becoming a Movie

Stephen King's Rest Stop Short Story Is Becoming a Movie
Stephen King's 2003 short story Rest Stop is being adapted for the big screen by Alex Ross Perry (Her Smell). Legendary Pictures has tapped Perry to write and direct the adaptation, which is being described as a "cat-and-mouse thriller." King originally wrote the story and had it published in Esquire Magazine 16 years ago. The short story went on to win the National Magazine Award for Fiction in 2004 and was later included in King's story collection Just After Sunset in 2008.

Alex Ross Perry has already made some changes to the source material, according to the brief Rest Stop synopsis. In addition to the cat-and-mouse vibe, it's a twisted journey of two women after an encounter at a rest stop, which swaps the genders from Stephen King's source material and adds an additional character instead of it just focusing on one. It isn't clear at this time if Perry will be keeping
See full article at MovieWeb »

Alex Ross Perry Will Write and Direct Stephen King Short Story Adaptation ‘Rest Stop’

Legendary Pictures has tapped Alex Ross Perry to write and direct a new film adaptation of the Stephen King short story “Rest Stop,” Variety is reporting. The short story follows an author who flees the scene after overhearing and breaking up a domestic spat at a rest stop. Initially published in a 2003 issue of Esquire, “Rest Stop” won the National Magazine Award for Fiction in 2004. It also appears in King’s 2008 story collection “Just After Sunset.”

According to Variety, the film will be a cat-and-mouse thriller following the twisted journey of two women after an encounter at a rest stop. If that is the case, Perry’s script will evidently diverge from the source material in some ways, including swapping the genders of the main character and focusing on two characters instead of one.

Perry is coming off of a critical highlight of his career with “Her Smell,” a dizzying
See full article at Indiewire »

Alex Ross Perry to Write and Direct Stephen King’s ‘Rest Stop’ for Legendary

  • Variety
Alex Ross Perry to Write and Direct Stephen King’s ‘Rest Stop’ for Legendary
Alex Ross Perry will write and direct Legendary’s film adaptation of Stephen King’s short story “Rest Stop.”

King’s short, first published in Esquire magazine in 2003, won the national magazine award for fiction in 2004, and was later included in King’s 2008 collection, “Just After Sunset.” The movie is described as a propulsive cat-and-mouse thriller that follows the twisted journey of two women after a fateful encounter at a highway rest stop.

Craig Flores will produce through his Bread & Circuses banner, while Alex Garcia and Ali Mendes will oversee the pic for Legendary.

Another King property, “Pet Sematary,” starring Jason Clarke, Amy Seimetz and John Lithgow, opened earlier this month to $25 million. The legendary author also has “It: Chapter Two” and “The Shining” sequel, “Doctor Sleep,” bowing soon.

Perry’s “Her Smell,” with Elisabeth Moss, Cara Delevingne and Dan Stevens, premiered at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival, and opened
See full article at Variety »

‘Her Smell’ Film Review: Elisabeth Moss Puts the Rock in Rock-Bottom in Redemptive Music Tale

  • The Wrap
‘Her Smell’ Film Review: Elisabeth Moss Puts the Rock in Rock-Bottom in Redemptive Music Tale
There’s a temptation to call “Her Smell” a greatest-hits compilation of the films of writer-director Alex Ross Perry. After all, it’s got the pitch-black humor of “The Color Wheel,” the narcissism of artists behaving badly from “Listen Up Philip” and the spectacle of Elisabeth Moss as a character spiraling out of control, just like “Queen of Earth.”

There’s more than a little nihilism in these films, delivered with those laughs that get caught in your throat, and Perry couldn’t be less interested in how likable or redeemable his characters might be. Something of a cult filmmaker until now, Perry calls things as he sees them, and he would appear to see them through the bleakest perspective possible.

But this is new material from the challenging auteur, one that reflects a deeper sense of maturity, displayed mainly in the idea of the possibility of redemption. Moss’ Becky Something,
See full article at The Wrap »

Alex Ross Perry Is Pissed At the Film Industry and Not Afraid to Explain Himself

Alex Ross Perry Is Pissed At the Film Industry and Not Afraid to Explain Himself
When Robert Greene first looked at the raw footage his longtime friend and collaborator Alex Ross Perry had brought him from the set of “Her Smell,” a familiar feeling began to bubble up in the editing room: They were about to make the greatest goddamn movie of all time. Greene, Perry’s regular editor, laughed at the way they characterized it at the time: “‘People are gonna compare this to “Boogie Nights,” but when we’re done, people are gonna forget how to even say the words ‘Boogie’ and ‘Nights.’ We’re gonna erase that shit from history because of what we’re doing!’”

Speaking over the phone from his house in Missouri, the editor remembered being preemptively stoked for post-production: “We had this incredible Elisabeth Moss performance, we had these amazing shots from [cinematographer] Sean Price Williams, the art direction was fucking spectacular, the lighting was gorgeous, the whole team had come together and delivered.
See full article at Indiewire »

AFI Sidebars Spotlight New Voices, Emerging Talent

  • Variety
AFI Sidebars Spotlight New Voices, Emerging Talent
Looking for the next Alfonso Cuarón, Dee Rees or Damien Chazelle? AFI Fest’s New Auteurs and American Independents sections are the place to discover them.

Comprising 18 films, this year’s New Auteurs program features a diverse mix from around the world including China, Germany and India, with 11 female and seven male up-and-coming directors in the mix. Meanwhile, the American Independents section features 11 narratives and documentaries — five of which are directed by women.

According to AFI Fest director of programming Lane Kneedler, both sections are a showcase for emerging filmmakers, some of whom have a

few films under their belts, and display a diversity of storytelling styles and modes.

“What we really see as a part of our programming mandate is to support filmmakers who are taking their first tentative steps into their careers and still establishing their aesthetic,” Kneedler says. “Being there with these filmmakers early in their careers
See full article at Variety »

‘Her Smell’ Review: Elisabeth Moss Is One of the Most Noxious Movie Characters of All Time in Brave and Rewarding Punk Epic

  • Indiewire
‘Her Smell’ Review: Elisabeth Moss Is One of the Most Noxious Movie Characters of All Time in Brave and Rewarding Punk Epic
So about that title. It stinks. It’s pungent and rancid. “Her Smell” could have a positive connotation, but you just know that it doesn’t here. There’s a hostility to it, like an odorous barrier you’d have to get through in order to reach the woman exuding it. Viewers familiar with any of Alex Ross Perry’s previous films will probably be holding their noses as they walk into this one. Newbies might want to follow suit.

Perry knows what he’s doing. His work has always had the courage to be profoundly unpleasant. We’re talking about a guy whose breakthrough film (“The Color Wheel”) was a micro-budget 16mm road trip comedy that built to a sudden eruption of incest, and whose comparatively star-studded follow-ups have shined a light on some of New York’s shittiest people. The most “likable character” in his entire body of
See full article at Indiewire »

Her Smell Trailer: Elizabeth Moss Is an Aging Punk Rock Diva

  • MovieWeb
Her Smell Trailer: Elizabeth Moss Is an Aging Punk Rock Diva
The first teaser for Her Smell is here. Elizabeth Moss has asserted herself as a truly tremendous performer on the small screen over the last decade or so. Starting with AMC's drama Mad Men and more recently in Hulu's acclaimed and award-winning series The Handmaid's Tale, Moss has made herself into an actress worth paying attention to whenever she's got a new project on the horizon. Such is the case with Her Smell, which is getting ready to make the festival rounds as awards season starts ramping up.

This initial teaser is actually a clip from the movie and sees Elisabeth Moss in an almost unrecognizable light. She disappears as a punk rock diva whose best days are long gone. We get a glimpse of her daily life, clearly clinging onto her past and making a show of herself for those who look more than fed up with her antics,
See full article at MovieWeb »

How Indie Mainstay Alex Ross Perry Came to Write 'Christopher Robin'

How Indie Mainstay Alex Ross Perry Came to Write 'Christopher Robin'
Alex Ross Perry has, to put it lightly, an unorthodox résumé for a writer on an all-ages Disney movie. The indie writer-director and sometimes actor has become a film festival mainstay for penning stridently unlikable characters (Listen Up Philip, Queen of Earth), homages to Philip Roth and Thomas Pynchon (The Color Wheel, Impolex) and an infamous incest scene (The Color Wheel). Sure, he once directed a music video for the rock duo Aly & Aj, who have worked on Disney projects, but that’s about as close as Perry came to catering to a juvenile audience before writing Christopher Robin, which bowed Friday....
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

‘Christopher Robin’ and ‘Mission: Impossible’ Go Head-to-Head at Box Office This Weekend

  • The Wrap
After opening at No. 1 to $61 million, “Mission: Impossible — Fallout” will again compete for the top spot on the box office charts this weekend against Disney’s new release “Christopher Robin.” Box office trackers have projected that both films will make between $30 million and $33 million this weekend.

For Disney, this is by far the most modest release on its calendar in a 2018 so far, when it has crushed the competition with some of the most highly anticipated blockbusters of the decade. In the last 153 days, Disney has seen four of its films — “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” “Black Panther,” “Avengers: Infinity War,” and most recently “Incredibles 2” — gross more than $1 billion worldwide, with “Infinity War” becoming the first-ever summer $2 billion hit.

Also Read: Fox and Disney Shareholders Vote to Approve $71.3 Billion Merger

And last week, Disney tightened its grip on Hollywood even further by completing its purchase of 20th Century Fox,
See full article at The Wrap »

'Golden Exits' Review: Brooklynites-Behaving-Badly Indie Boasts Stars, Chops

'Golden Exits' Review: Brooklynites-Behaving-Badly Indie Boasts Stars, Chops
"People never make films about ordinary people who never do anything."

"They're out there..."

That first meta-statement comes from Naomi (Emily Browning), an Australian twentysomething with a work visa, a temp gig as an archivist's assistant and the sort of youthful bloom that attracts both wanted and unwanted attention. The reply is from Nick (ex-Beastie Boy Adam Horowitz), her married fortysomething employer who's currently doling out the latter; he finishes the sentence with "... and I could take you to one some time," which suggests that underneath his nice-guy facade, something potentially toxic this way lies.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

New to Streaming: ‘Columbus,’ ‘Kiss Kiss Bang Bang,’ ‘Wind River,’ Alex Ross Perry, and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Films of Alex Ross Perry

As we await distribution for Alex Ross Perry’s Golden Exits, which premiered at Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, FilmStruck is presenting a selection of his first three features, Implox, The Color Wheel, and Listen Up Philip. Also streaming is a master class with Perry’s frequent editor (and excellent director in his own right) Robert Greene.

Where to Stream: FilmStruck
See full article at The Film Stage »

Alex Ross Perry On Jerry Lewis: ‘He Inspired Me as a Philosopher’

Alex Ross Perry On Jerry Lewis: ‘He Inspired Me as a Philosopher’
Jerry Lewis inspired generations of comedians and comedic filmmakers, as many of immediate tributes in the wake of his death at 91 prove. One of the more recent directors to emerge in American cinema to cite his work is Alex Ross Perry, whose 2011 sleeper hit “The Color Wheel” was a wily black comedy that owed much to Lewis’ madcap performances. Perry’s followup, “Listen Up Phillip,” showed similar influences.

Reached for comment following the news of Lewis’ death, Perry shared the following statement on his relationship to Lewis’ work.

Whenever I would cite Jerry Lewis as an influence, I would qualify the statement by saying he inspired me more as a philosopher than a comedian. The remark would get a laugh but I would elaborate, with total sincerity. The intellectual drive of this man, from the very beginning of his career through his instantly-legendary Hollywood Reporter interview last year (his final masterpiece,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Golden Exits’ Review: Alex Ross Perry Tries His Hand at Intimacy, With Mixed Results — Sundance 2017

‘Golden Exits’ Review: Alex Ross Perry Tries His Hand at Intimacy, With Mixed Results — Sundance 2017
Alex Ross Perry doesn’t usually go for “nice” characters — from the disaffected siblings at the heart of “The Color Wheel” to Jason Schwartzman’s gleefully abrasive title character in “Listen Up Philip” to the deeply destructive ladies of “Queen of Earth,” the filmmaker has never shown much interest in stories about people who treat each other well. With his intimacy drama “Golden Exits,” Perry strays from his typical fare of people behaving badly to, well, people behaving not quite as badly and certainly with more believable motivation.

Australian student Naomi (Emily Browning) is spending the spring in New York City — Brooklyn, specifically, as much of “Golden Exits” takes place within the confines of Perry’s own Cobble Hill neighborhood — working for Nick (Adam Horowitz, who is mostly out of his depth in the role), an archivist who takes a new assistant every semester to help him with his work.
See full article at Indiewire »

Scott Reviews Alex Ross Perry’s Golden Exits [Sundace 2017]

Prolificacy can catch up to even the most dogged of artists. For writer/director Alex Ross Perry, one of the most distinct and sharp voices of his generation, Golden Exits is the moment his speed (this is his third feature in a three-year span) has caught up. The whole movie revolves about exhaustion – the exhaustion of carrying on youthful enthusiasms into middle age, of maintaining relationships that have lost their spark, of answering the same questions about your life for fifteen straight years. So, too, can one nearly feel the exhaustion in making it. The gradual plodding of the keyboard and lack of interest in revision permeate a 94-minute film that manages to be both well-structured and underwritten. I looked at his 2014 breakout film, Listen Up Philip, and saw a man who wanted to reach the heights of Woody Allen at his most creatively feverish and emotionally unsteady. Three years later,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Alex Ross Perry’s ‘Golden Exits’ Is A Collection Of Half-Realized Ideas And Characters [Sundance Review]

Only a filmmaker as talented as Alex Ross Perry could make a movie as misbegotten as “Golden Exits.” With his past features “Impolex,” “The Color Wheel,” “Listen Up Philip,” and “Queen of Earth,” Perry has established himself as one of American independent cinema’s best young writer-directors, equally interested in the quality of his images and the richness of his characters.

Continue reading Alex Ross Perry’s ‘Golden Exits’ Is A Collection Of Half-Realized Ideas And Characters [Sundance Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Coming Distractions: Emily Browning croons “New York Groove” in the teaser for Golden Exits

We’re always interested in indie writer-director Alex Ross Perry here at The A.V. Club. His nearly-no-budget sophomore feature, The Color Wheel, was one our favorite comedies of the current decade, and the subsequent Listen Up Philip and Queen Of Earth were both superb. So of course we’re eagerly anticipating his new film, Golden Exits, which will have its premiere at Sundance this weekend. (Our film editor, A.A. Dowd, will be sending in daily dispatches from the festival, starting later today.)

And, lo and behold, a brief teaser for the film has appeared—a teaser that contains absolutely no information about the film, and in fact consists of nothing but an unbroken shot of star Emily Browning singing “New York Groove,” a song made semi-famous by Kiss guitarist Ace Frehley during in the band’s 1978 experiment in testing the limits of its fanbase.

Still, we’ll ...
See full article at The AV Club »
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