Black Bread (2010) - News Poster

(2010)

News

Latido Takes Juanma Bajo Ulloa’s ‘Baby’ (Exclusive)

  • Variety
San Sebastian – Latido Films has taken world sales rights outside Spain on Juanma Bajo Ulloa’s “Baby,” a drama with a psychological thriller narrative thrust starring Rosie Day (“Down a Dark Hall”), Harriet Sansom Harris (“Phantom Thread”), Natalia Tena (“Game of Thrones”), Charo López (“All Night Long”) and young actress Mafalda Carbonell (“To Live Twice”).

Vitoria-based Frágil Zinema produces.

A San Sebastian Golden Shell winner for “Butterflies Wings” in 1991, “Baby” signals the director’s feature return following “Fragile” (2004) and “Gipsy King” (2014).

“We think ‘Baby’ is the movie in which Juanma is going to extract once again all the cinema he has inside. It’s an open genre film with a very powerful concept and he has managed to work with extraordinary artistic and technical teams,” Latido Films CEO Antonio Saura told Variety.

“Baby” is a movie about second opportunities. Set in the Basque country, it depicts a depressed and drug-addicted
See full article at Variety »

Toronto: Filmax Acquires Lucia Alemany’s ‘The Innocence’ (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Madrid — Barcelona-based Filmax has acquired world sales rights to “La Innocencia” (“The Innocence”), an uncompromising rites of passage feature which has been sparking good buzz over the summer off sneak previews in Spain.

An integrated film-tv production-distribution-sales operation, Filmax will also handle the film’s Spanish distribution.

Filmax’s Ivan Díaz will introduce “The Innocence” to buyers at a private screening at Toronto before it world premieres in competition at San Sebastian’s New Directors section, the Spanish festival’s main sidebar.

The feature debut of Spain’s Lucía Alemany confirms yet another talent-to-track young woman director based or trained in Barcelona.

Featuring Sergi López, Laia Marull and network À Punt, and Catalan public broadcaster TV3 and the Catalan Institute of Cultural Industries (Icec).

Penned by Laia Soler and Alemany, and drawing heavily on Alemany’s own experiences, “The Innocence” kicks off with a knowing portrait of Lis, 15, hanging out
See full article at Variety »

Projects By Mendez Esparza, Fernando Franco and Villaronga at Small Is Biutiful

  • Variety
Antonio Méndez Esparza’s “Que nadie duerma,” Fernando Franco’s “La consagración de la primavera” and Agustí Villaronga’s “3.000 obstáculos” figure among the seven projects to be pitched at Paris’ Small Is Biutiful forum.

The closing event for the alternative Spanish film festival Dífferent 12!, Small Is Biutiful takes place June 26, bringing together French distributors and sales executives around a selection of Spanish feature projects seeking partners.

Backed by the Cannes Film Market, Different! is organised by Espagnolas en Paris and the Ile-de-France Film Commission.

Past projects presented at Small Is Biutiful take in Oliver Laxe’s “Mimosas,” which won Cannes 2016 Critics’ Week; Carlos Vermut’s “Magical Girl,” San Sebastián’s top Golden Shell Award in 2014, and Arantxa Echevarría’s “Carmen & Lola,” winner of breakout director and supporting actress nods at February’s Goya Awards, as well as a Cannes Directors’ Fortnight contender.

“Que nadie duerma” is produced by Pedro Hernández
See full article at Variety »

Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote gets a new poster

Following last month’s trailer for The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, we now have a brand new for Terry Gilliam’s long-awaited passion project featuring Adam Driver, Jonathan Pryce, Olga Kurylenko, Stellan Skarsgård, and Joana Ribeiro; take a look here…

See Also: Read our review of The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

Toby (Adam Driver), a cynical advertising director, finds himself trapped in the outrageous delusions of an old Spanish shoe-maker (Jonathan Pryce) who believes himself to be Don Quixote. In the course of their comic and increasingly surreal adventures, Toby is forced to confront the tragic repercussions of a film he made in his idealistic youth – a film that changed the hopes and dreams of a small Spanish village forever. Can Toby make amends and regain his humanity? Can Don Quixote survive his madness and imminent death? Or will love conquer all?

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote gets a new poster

After a turbulent two decade journey to the screen (not to mention some legal wranglings around its premiere in Cannes last year which resulted in the loss of U.S. distribution via Amazon), Terry Gilliam’s passion project The Man Who Killed Don Quixote is finally gearing up for a release, and you can take a look at a new poster for the film here…

See Also: Read our review of The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

Toby (Adam Driver), a cynical advertising director, finds himself trapped in the outrageous delusions of an old Spanish shoe-maker (Jonathan Pryce) who believes himself to be Don Quixote. In the course of their comic and increasingly surreal adventures, Toby is forced to confront the tragic repercussions of a film he made in his idealistic youth – a film that changed the hopes and dreams of a small Spanish village forever. Can Toby make amends and regain his humanity?
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Lucía Alemany’s ‘Innocence’ Rolls with Sergi López, Laia Marull (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Lucía Alemany’s ‘Innocence’ Rolls with Sergi López, Laia Marull (Exclusive)
Madrid — Sergi López and Laia Marull co-star in rites-of-passage drama “La Inocencia” (Innocence), the feature debut of Lucía Alemany, a key name in a generation of often very young women cineastes now energizing Catalan cinema.

Starring Carmen Arrufet in her first lead role, and Joel Bosqued (“Que baje dios y lo vea”), “Innocence” marks a follow-up to Alemany’s multi-prized short “14 Years and a Day.” Produced by Morena Films, and a take on adolescent angst, budding sexuality and daughter-mother conflict set in a nosy Spanish village where privacy is near impossible, the short marked out Alemany, an alum of Barcelona’s Escac film school, as very much a director to track.

In production from Aug. 6 in Alemany’s home village of Traiguera, in the region of Castellón, central eastern Spain, “Innocence” comes with strong backing. Alemany has been championed by Iciar Bollaín, one of Spain’s most foremost women directors,
See full article at Variety »

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote producer refutes claim that Terry Gilliam has lost the rights

The saga of The Man Who Killed Don Quixote has taken another turn now following the news last week that a court has ruled in favour of former producer Paulo Branco granting him the rights to Terry Gilliam’s passion project.

Branco had stated that his company Alfama would be seeking damages against Gilliam, the film’s producers Kinology, and distributors who have already shown the film without his authorisation.

However, the film’s current producer Mariela Busuievsky has informed El Espanol (via The Playlist) that Branco is overstating his legal victory, and that he doesn’t have any claim to the final film as none of it was shot under the contract that he held with Gilliam.

According to Busuievsky, the only issue is that Gilliam did not properly terminate his contract with Branco, and will need to pay Alfama at least $11,600 in damages. However, the film reportedly still remains the property of Gilliam,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Terry Gilliam loses the rights to The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

Having taken him the best part of 30 years, filmmaker Terry Gilliam finally completed his passion project The Man Who Killed Don Quixote this year, only for the saga to have one final twist in the tale.

In May, former producer Paulo Branco launched a legal dispute over the rights to the movie, which cost the film its Amazon distribution deal, as well as putting the Cannes premiere in jeopardy.

While a court ruled in favour of Gilliam with regards to the Cannes screening, allowing it to go ahead, the Paris Court of Appeal has now sided with Branco and his Alfama Films, granting him full ownership of the film.

“The ruling means that the rights to the film belong to Alfama,” Branco told Screen Daily. “Any exploitation of the film up until now has been completely illegal and without the authorisation of Alfama. We will be seeking damages with interest
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Lost in La Mancha sequel to chronicle Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

This coming week will see the Cannes Film Festival premiere of Terry Gilliam’s passion project The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, with the filmmaker and former Python finally achieving his ambition of bringing the movie to the big screen after almost 30 years of trying.

Giliam first began shooting The Man Who Killed Don Quixote in 2000, with Jean Rochefort and Johnny Depp starring, only for the production to encounter a host of setbacks which ultimately saw it shutting down. After several more failed attempts, Gilliam finally got things moving last year with Jonathan Pryce and Adam Driver, with the completed movie set to premiere this coming Saturday as the closing film at Cannes.

Gilliam’s troubles with his 2000 shoot were chronicled in 2002’s documentary Lost in La Mancha, and now Variety is reporting that filmmakers Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe are set to finish the story with the sequel He Dreams of Giants.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote saga continues as the film loses its Amazon distribution, but can screen at Cannes

The turbulent 30-year history of Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote continues to be a head-scratcher, with Amazon today pulling out of its deal to distribute the troubled movie, as a court ruled that it will be allowed to close the Cannes Film Festival.

Gilliam’s movie was first mooted way back in 1989. He secured funding to make it in the 1990s, with Johnny Depp in the leading role, but that chaotic production fell apart so spectacularly that its ‘Making Of’ documentary was released independently as Lost in La Mancha in 2002.

The movie has now, against all odds, been completed with Jonathan Pryce and Adam Driver in the two main roles. However, a legal dispute has put a potential roadblock in its path.

See Also: Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote gets a new trailer

Former producer Paulo Branco claims the rights to the
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote gets a new trailer

With less than three weeks to go until it makes its world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival, a new trailer has debuted for Terry Gilliam’s long-gestating passion project The Man Who Killed Don Quixote; watch it here…

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote follows Toby, a jaded commercials director who travels to Spain for a shoot and comes across a gypsy who gives a copy of his student film — a lyrical re-working of the Don Quixote story set in a quaint old Spanish village. Moved by the discovery, Toby sets off on a bizarre road trip to find the little village where the student student film was shot and gets caught up in a series of catastrophies.

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote features a cast that includes Jonathan Pryce (Game of Thrones) as Quixote and Adam Driver (Star Wars: The Force Awakens) as Toby, while the rest
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

First trailer for Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

No, you’re not imagining things, and this isn’t a late April Fool’s Day joke… After years of development hell, production hell, and a myriad of setbacks and delays, the first trailer for Terry Gilliam’s long-gestating passion project The Man Who Killed Don Quixote has arrived online, and check it out below along with an international poster…

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote follows Toby, a jaded commercials director who travels to Spain for a shoot and comes across a gypsy who gives a copy of his student film — a lyrical re-working of the Don Quixote story set in a quaint old Spanish village. Moved by the discovery, Toby sets off on a bizarre road trip to find the little village where the student student film was shot and gets caught up in a series of catastrophies.

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote features a cast that
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Official Oscar® Entry from Spain ‘Summer 1993’

Official Oscar® Entry from Spain ‘Summer 1993’
Summer 1993 — Catalonia, Spain

So cathartic was Summer 1993 that my personal psyche will be marked by it forever. Why this story, about a six year old girl who quietly and slowly comes to terms with the death of her mother and how the process, invisible to anyone watching, culminates in a sudden crescendo of emotion moved me to tears, is what you must find out on your own.

No one knows the emotions of another person unless communication, self-knowledge and compassion work in favor of knowing. Yes tears and laughter mean a lot but without tears and laughter, there are thousands of feelings not communicated which result in actions whose meaning is unknown. And for children who have no words for their feelings or why they act as they do, adults can only surmise and intuit if they are able.

A child of six has no way of knowing death; children are fearless,
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Spain focus: hot projects, big-name draws

Among the most anticipated Spanish productions of the year are a Paleolithic period drama, the new Almodovar and a regal role for Penelope Cruz.A Monster Calls

Dir Ja Bayona

A Monster Calls completes Bayona’s trilogy exploring motherhood, after The Orphanage and The Impossible. Patrick Ness has adapted his novel about a boy who seeks refuge in a fantasy world. The English-language film, which shot in Spain and the UK, stars Liam Neeson. It is a Spain-us co-production between Apaches Entertainment with Telecinco Cinema, Peliculas La Trini, Participant Media, River Road Entertainment and Lionsgate. Set for release in the autumn, it will be distributed in Spain by Universal Pictures International, in the Us by Focus and in the UK via eOne.

Contact Lionsgate International: www.lionsgate.com

Abracadabra

Dir Pablo Berger

Berger’s follow-up to Blancanieves again stars Maribel Verdu, this time as a housewife determined to fight the spirit possessing her husband. Set to shoot
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Spanish movie nominated for Mexican film award

Spanish movie nominated for Mexican film award
Madrid, April 13 (Ians/Efe) The big winner in Spain's Goya film awards, "Blancanieves", has been nominated for Mexico's Ariel prize in the category of best Ibero-American picture.

Pablo Berger's silent, black-and-white version of the Snow White tale features Mexican actor Daniel Gimenez Cacho in the leading role and is scheduled to open in Mexico June 21.

"Blancanieves" will vie with Chile's "No" and the Ecuadorian feature "Pescador" for the Ariel for best Ibero-American film.

Last year's award went to Spain's "Pa negre", the fifth Spanish film to snag the Ariel.

Winners of the 55th edition of the Ariel prizes will be announced at a May 28 gala in Mexico City.

Director Luis Mandoki's "La vida precoz.
See full article at RealBollywood »

Spanish Film Festival Kicks Off In Los Angeles

The Spanish film festival Recent Spanish Cinema kicks off its series of outstanding Spanish films at the Egyptian Theatre in Los Angeles this week on October 13. The 2011 film series opens with the premiere of the official Spanish Entry for Best Foreign Language Film for the Academy Awards 2012, Black Bread (Pa Negre) directed by Agustí Villaronga and starring Nora Navas and Francesc Colomer.

The Recent Spanish Cinema series is sponsored by the Spanish Institute for Film and Audiovisual Arts (Icaa) a part of the Ministry of Culture, together with the American Cinematheque and Egeda (Audio-visual Producers Rights Management Association). The 17th edition of the series will run from October 13 16, 2011. Actors Nora Navas and Alvaro Cervantes and director Achero Mañas will be in attendance as honorees.

This year’s selection of recent Spanish cinema highlights everything from the most exuberant genre pieces to dramas notable for their restrained subtlety. Selections

Read more.
See full article at CineMovie »

International Horror News: La Casa Muda Represents Uruguay at the Oscars; Spain Sticks It Up Almodovar's Ass Again

Two pieces of interesting international horror news recently came to our attention, and as always, we're passing the info along to you. Think of what a water-cooler stud you'll be when you say…"Hey, I heard that Uruguay is submitting La Casa Muda for Oscar consideration" or "Can you believe Spain snubbed Pedro Almodovar again!?" The ladies will be tearing their panties off for you. Literally ripping undergarments from their bodies because they are so impressed with your knowledge of international cinema. You're welcome.

Uruguay selects La Casa Muda for Oscar consideration

Gustavo Hernandez made magic on a small budget with his film La Casa Muda (The Silent House). Now his efforts are paying off as Uruguay has selected his horror film to be submitted for Foreign-Language Film consideration at the 2012 Oscars.

La Casa Muda (review here) stars Florencia Colucci, Abel Tripaldi, Gustavo Alonso and Maria Salazar in a chilling
See full article at Dread Central »

Spain Sidesteps Almodovar Again For Oscar Entry

Spain Sidesteps Almodovar Again For Oscar Entry
As the last minute foreign film Oscar contenders trickle in, Spain threw a curveball into the race.

The country sidestepped Pedro Almodovar once again, choosing "Pa Negre" (Black Bread) as its entry for the foreign language Oscar over Almodovar's "The Skin I Live In," starring Antonio Banderas. While the director has been snubbed in recent years for "Volver" and "Broken Embraces," he won a Best Original Screenplay Oscar for "Talk to Her" in 2002 and earned the Best Foreign Film Oscar for "All About My Mother" in 1999. He was also nominated for a foreign language Oscar in 1988 for "Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown."

"Pa Negre" tells the story of a family after the Spanish Civil War. From Spain's point of view, "Pa Negre" is hardly a curveball. The film won nine awards, including the top prizes for Best Film and Best Director, at Spain's equivalent to the Oscars,
See full article at Huffington Post »

Oscar Watch: Spain and Italy Snub Auteurs Almodovar and Moretti

Oscar Watch: Spain and Italy Snub Auteurs Almodovar and Moretti
On the foreign Oscar front Spain has disappointed Pedro Almodovar yet again by not picking The Skin I Live In, which failed to win a prize at Cannes. Sony Pictures Classics is releasing the kinky thriller starring Antonio Banderas stateside. And Italy did not choose Nanni Moretti's non-award winning Cannes entry Habemus Papam, either, which IFC is releasing here. Instead, Agusti Villaronga’s post-Spanish Civil War drama Black Bread, which swept the Goyas, Spain's Academy Awards, is the official Spanish submission. Writes Screen: It's about a young boy living in a small Catalan village who uncovers dark secrets from the past. For its part, Italy went with Emanuele Crialese's Venice Fest special jury prize winner Terraferma, which also played well in Toronto. Toh Venice correspondent David ...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
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