Studio One in Hollywood (1948–1958)
5.5/10
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3 user 1 critic

An Almanac of Liberty 

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When a stranger to a small town is beaten up by a locals, upright residents gather, inexplicably, against their will to the town hall. Once assembled, they find they can't leave and time ... See full summary »

Director:

Paul Nickell

Writers:

William O. Douglas (based on the book by), Reginald Rose (written for Studio One by)
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
P.J. Kelly P.J. Kelly ... Mr. Neary - the Man Who Dusts
Archie Smith Archie Smith ... Harmon
Ethel Remey Ethel Remey ... Mrs. Church (as Ethel Everett)
Bruce Marshall Bruce Marshall ... Mikey Lester
Ginger MacManus Ginger MacManus ... Susie
Florence Sundstrom Florence Sundstrom ... Ottile Sweetster
Brandon Peters Brandon Peters ... Horace Sweetser - City Cuncil President
Dorothy Patten Dorothy Patten ... Matty Wilkinson
Karl Lukas Karl Lukas ... Hank - Man Who Struck Carter
Jock MacGregor Jock MacGregor ... Sam Hunt
Clarice Blackburn ... Sybil Hunt
Fred Herrick Fred Herrick ... Ted Franklin - Police Officer
Gene Sultan Gene Sultan ... Billy Sweetser
James Winslow James Winslow ... Dr. Slattery
Eli Mintz ... Phil Nathan - the Tailor
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Storyline

When a stranger to a small town is beaten up by a locals, upright residents gather, inexplicably, against their will to the town hall. Once assembled, they find they can't leave and time has stopped. All talk about the stranger, (also present). Some express rage for his views and reveal their misguided ideas of American patriotism, which are really prejudices against freedom of thought and free speech. Written by WesternOne

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Genres:

Drama

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Details

Language:

English

Release Date:

8 November 1954 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA

Company Credits

Production Co:

CBS Television Network See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

As the townspeople try to recall specific measures from the Bill of Rights, they leap from the First Amendment to the Fourth before going back to the First. In the order they are mentioned: Freedom of speech, press and religion (First Amendment), protection from unreasonable search and seizure (Fourth), freedom of assembly (First), just compensation (Fifth), due process (Fifth), self-incrimination (Fifth), double jeopardy (Fifth), right to face accuser (Sixth), to be informed of charges (Sixth), to have legal counsel (Sixth), trial by jury (Sixth and Seventh), no excessive bail or fines (Eighth), no cruel or unusual punishment (Eighth). Not all amendments and their key rights are covered: The right to keep and bear arms (Second), protection from quartering troops (Third), protection of rights not enumerated in the Constitution (Ninth), retention of power by the states and people (Tenth). See more »

Soundtracks

Introduction from "Le Coq d' Or"
Music by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
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User Reviews

 
an allegory on the rights of man
19 November 2008 | by didi-5See all my reviews

This Studio One production, set almost completely in a town hall (apart from one pre-title scene) in a small American town, looks at what happens when a town's people start looking so inwardly that they forget about their rights and the rights of others.

John Carter, a stranger, has come looking for work, but in fact finds hatred, fear, and suspicion. The nominal leader of the town, Wilkinson, has men and women alike bowing down to his will - and only the local newspaperman Phillips has the nerve to question his authority.

When all the townsfolk come together for a meeting that no one remembers being invited to, things start to go strangely. Only by taking a step back and looking at the situation from an outside perspective can the normal pace of life reassert itself.

A fascinating period piece, 'An Almanac of Liberty' uses words and characters to put a powerful point across. Well worth watching.


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