"Route 66" Lizard's Leg and Owlet's Wing (TV Episode 1962) Poster

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6/10
With Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre and Lon Chaney Jr, this is a fun episode!
padutchland-11 June 2006
Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre and Lon Chaney, Jr. (Creighton Chaney)decide to meet at a hotel called O'Hare Inn near Chicago to discuss the monster business. Naturally, heads turn when they enter the motel. It is a large hotel with swimming pool, meeting rooms and the need to hire a couple of young guys - Martin Milner and George MaHaris arrive in the famous Corvette. Bringing in giants of film like these three guest stars made for a fun episode and a kind of a tip of the hat to these horror stars of the 1940s and 1950s. Karloff and Chaney had the opportunity to done makeup as Frankenstein and The Wolf Man. Just as Milner and Maharis show up, so does the hotel van with a bevy of beauties for a secretary's training program. While George is busy checking the girls, Martin is stuck with group sales and the three horror stars. Marharis doesn't believe that he has seen Frankenstein and Wolf Man so seeing is believing. What follows is a comedy type show with the misunderstandings of these groups. An entertaining show. You might notice Mrs. Baxter (she was sitting next to the coffin)in this episode. She will be remembered in that outstanding role she did as old Mrs. Havisham in the 1946 version of Great Expectations (the best version). She did much in her career including playing in Unsinkable Molly Brown, Becket and Anastasia. The three old time horror actors still had it and worked well together in this for just plain fun. Take a look if you get the chance.
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9/10
Fun From Beginning to End
rwint161125 May 2008
Considered one of the series top and most beloved episodes it features Karloff, Chaney, and Lorre all playing themselves and hamming it up to the max. They converge at a Chicago hotel while at the same time there is a secretary's convention going on there. They are making plans for their 'comeback horror movie' and decide to test out their new monster outfits on the secretary's to see if they still have what it takes to scare people. The result is over the top hilarity and culminates with every secretary fainting at the sight of Chaney in his wolf man outfit. It's fun from beginning to end. There is also the added element of seeing a rivalry crop up between Todd and Buzz who compete with each other for the attentions of the secretaries while working on the hotel's wait staff.

The only negative to this episode is the fact that all the women are stereotyped as being overly lovesick, ditzy, and too easily frightened. Again this is mostly done for the sake of comedy, but in the end it gets to be a bit much. However the line that Lorre gives to the hotel desk clerk who seems to recognize him is a real gem.

Grade: A
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9/10
worth the wait
hachmom-11 November 2014
Warning: Spoilers
I have been searching for this episode for many years, ever since I read Dennis Gifford's biography of Karloff in high school. MeTV was kind enough to run it as part of a Halloween marathon. I enjoyed it a great deal. Seeing Karloff, Chaney and Lorre carry on like a trio of schoolboys was quite entertaining. Here at least the 3 display a genuine affection for each other. All 3 seem to be having a wonderful time. There were also a lot of clever digs at TV and movies.

It was a real joy to see Chaney and Karloff in their most famous roles on more time. The question of whether old school monster can still scare the audience is treated with humor, but ironically the subject would recur more dramatically in Karloff's last major film-- Targets.

All told an exceptionally enjoyable outing, especially for Lorre, Karloff and Chaney.
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7/10
"Pick a magic number between eighteen and twenty five."
classicsoncall17 March 2012
Warning: Spoilers
Even though I don't remember this particular episode, I DO remember sitting on the couch and watching 'Route 66' with my Dad when I was a kid. For me the show wasn't particularly interesting, basically just two guys driving around the country and winding up in some kind of adventure each week in a different city. But back then there were only three network TV stations to choose from, and this was what my father liked to watch. So now some fifty years later I'm probably one of the few people who can actually tell you who starred in the show without having to look it up. George Maharis was a new face for me at the time, but I thought it was pretty cool that the other guy was Babs's boyfriend from the William Bendix TV series 'The Life of Riley'. I don't know how I remember that kind of stuff, I just do.

'Lizard's Leg and Owlet's Wing' was a reunion of sorts for a couple of movie horror icons, Boris Karloff and Lon Chaney, reprising the monster characters that made them famous in film. Chaney in fact portrayed both The Mummy and Wolf Man in the show, while Karloff did a reasonably looking but decidedly less frightening Frankenstein. Had Bela Lugosi still been alive I think he might have been asked to participate here, but Peter Lorre did a good job of rounding out the cast for this episode. The story had to do with the trio agreeing to meet and hammer out a new concept for horror pictures; with the changing times they weren't sure if their brand of fright could still make viewers scared.

So they agree to meet at the O'Hare Inn outside of Chicago, and as luck would have it, Tod Stiles (Milner) and Buz Murdock (Maharis) have just arrived to take jobs as liaisons for an executive secretaries convention occurring at the hotel. One of the great things about watching these old shows is how they put things in context for viewers watching today. Convention chairwoman Lila Bain (Betsy-Jones Moreland) laments the disparity in pay between men and women, get this - $1.58 vs. $1.17 per hour for a hotel laundry clerk! Or how about a male bank teller making ninety one dollars per week against a female's rate of sixty three dollars! All relative of course, but it does make you think.

Anyway, the horror gimmick gets played out to the max, particularly with Chaney who goes over the top with his Wolf Man get up. Every woman he encounters faints dead away quicker than an onlooker at an Obama campaign rally. With Frankenstein, Wolf Man, and Lorre as Dracula, the series stars really don't have much to do in this one other than sit back and enjoy the show. The episode aired during Halloween week back in 1962, and if you're a fan of these horror icons or of the show Route 66 itself, this one is a blast.
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9/10
Cute and Fun
Rainey-Dawn8 March 2016
I remember watching reruns of Route 66 as teen (1980s) but I don't ever recall seeing this particular episode - maybe one of those special episodes they rarely showed IDK but at any rate I have finally just recently seen this episode and yes it's all it's cracked up to be. It's very cute and fun - funny! Of course I knew it had to be good - just had to be - due to Peter Lorre, Boris Karloff and Lon Chaney and Route 66 was/is a good show to begin with.

This one is most definitely a worthwhile episode - a bit different than the others as you might have guessed already.

9/10
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10/26/62 "Lizard's Leg and Owlet's Wing"
schappe120 July 2015
Warning: Spoilers
This is another attempt at combining old movie nostalgia with humor, much like "Journey to Nineveh" but this one works much better. It has its flaws, but it's entertaining. The boys pull into the O'Hare Inn and somehow immediately get jobs as "convention coordinators", basically concierges for different groups. One of them is a convention of executive secretaries, all of them pretty. Buz is delighted to have that job. Tod gets assigned to the 'Society for the Preservation of the Gerenuks'. A Gerenuk is a gazelle who looks like an antelope with the neck of a giraffe, Peter Lorre explains to Tod. They are endangers and if the Gerenuk goes, the human race can't be far behind!

Actually, Peter is playing himself- sort of. He's depicted as an aging star of horror movies who is to meet there with two other old horror stars in the same predicament- Lon Chaney and Boris Karloff. Times are changing and people just aren't scared by the old monsters any more. They need to come up with new ones to keep their careers going. Or so Karloff thinks. Lorre and Chaney like the old ways.

The ever helpful Tod comes up with a plan: they could dress as their old characters and see if they can scare Buz's executive secretaries in them. They succeed and it convinces the "society" that the bold monsters still work. We see scenes of Chaney and Karloff in their classic disguises- Frankenstein, the Wolf Man, the Mummy- running through the halls of the hotel, causing the poor women to faint in their tracks. The old monsters still work!

One of the problems is that the sexist attitudes of the period really come to the fore here. The women, presumably efficient businesswomen- they are, after all, executive secretaries- not just typists- are leered at and shown as mentally weak when faced by the "monsters", (and their make-up is not nearly so good as in the original movies- they look like they are their way to a Halloween party).

The other one is Peter Lorre. He'd played some pretty weird characters but didn't play monsters, although he did a couple of films for Roger Corman based on Edgar Allan Poe stories after this episode. For that reason, he has no costume in the final sequence. He's obviously standing in for Bela Lugosi, who had died in 1955, (which didn't prevent him from appearing in Ed Woods' camp classic, "Plan Nine From Outer Space in 1959). Lorre orders a coffin to be the center piece of the society's meeting. But's not dressed like a vampire. Apparently, his normal appearance is supposed to be scary. Early in his career he was thin and those big eyes and sing-song voice somehow made him intimidating is a sort of oily way. But by 1962, (two years away from his death from a stroke), he was fat, baggy-eyed and jowly. He looks pathetic, not scary. What an episode this could have been with Lugosi, Chaney and Karloff! Lorre, Chaney and Karloff just aren't the same.

By the way, they assume the names Mr. Retep, Mr. Nol and Mr. Sirob when pretending to be concerned with Gerenuks. And, no Gerenuk doesn't mean anything when spelled backwards (kunereg).

One apparently mundane scene I liked because it underscores the difference between this series and others is a scene where Tod is making a call from the hotel kitchen. In the background we see the kitchen works making the meals that would be consumed by the residents of the hotel, (probably including the company of "Route 66") that evening. With Route 66, you are there, exactly where the episodes are supposed to be taking place. Talk about reality television!
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6/10
"I Can't Believe My Eyes"
AudioFileZ5 March 2012
Warning: Spoilers
Tod says "I Can't Believe My Eyes" and so it is with a sense of just that the trio of "The Golden Age" of Hollywood Horror movies stars all guest star here. Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre, and Lon Chaney Jr. appear together as only Route 66 can pull off. It's an episode just for fun and to pay homage to three greats of the early silver screen's romance for horror films.

I'll admit it is wrapped in a slight story line whereby our three horror icons meet in a clandestine meeting to plan a new assault revolving around a proposed TV show/series. They choose a Chicago Inn near the airport that happens to be guesting an executive secretary's convention simultaneously. Hi jinx ensue, and though it can only be described as silly and contrived it entertains. Just the presence, and differences, in the great actors persona's is well worth a watch.

I've read this is a favorite episode, though I don't exactly agree I can see how many would rate it higher than my personal view. The title is pure Route 66, the scattered sarcasm by Lorre, and the interaction of three Hollywood icons largely overcome my reservations. I love the series and admit the diversity is nice. I see it as a valentine to these giants of horror.
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10/10
Karloff, Lorre and Chaney meet....Jeannine Riley
frank412220 August 2019
Well it's better than meeting Frankenstein. Toto I don't think we're in Petticoat Junction anymore. Even Buz is mesmerized by Riley's beauty in that he is oblivious to the fact he's walking off course through the kiddie pool. This episode is a role reversal in that the true icons of horror cinema are providing the comic relief and the future star of Petticoat Junction is providing the suspense. Tod and Buz show some great comedic timing of their own working as guest liaisons at the motel. This episode brings back some great memories, even some wonderful scary ones. It is surprising with this cast that there are no shocking moments until the very end. And that was well worth the wait.
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10/10
America, the beautiful (horror icons)....
simeon_flake16 July 2019
I know I shouldn't laugh every-time I have a Peter Lorre moment, but the way he said "Calm down Boris, baby," it reminds me that playing a child murderer ain't all that bad. I realized he just played around for no reason since he only made one Universal monster movie & was having fun with the fact that he was only there being too funny because he made only one attempt at being a Nazi sympathizer &I had worry about myself because he might be funny (Get Smart, I guess)....

At any rate, Lon just sits there & tries to be scary by just rising up as the Mummy & Boris was like, yeah, I already get the joke. Meanwhile, the part that really gets me is once he's back to his old Wolf-Man makeup, Peter just says I like that & I had a "son of Frankenstein" moment, because all Lon has to do is wear makeup & fall out because he's not the really Lon Chaney. Just scaring the women who don't believe in horror movies.

The only thing left to say is, we did it & Vincent Price is still making more money than Boris "Scare "em to Death" Karloff....

🤣
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Fat City for Old Movie Fans
dougdoepke28 October 2017
It's fat city for horror movie fans, especially those of us who hide under beds. Icons of the past, Karloff, Chaney Jr., and Lorre are together at last. Truth be told, my feelings are sort of mixed seeing them playing themselves and spoofing their monster roles. I guess I want fantasy, not reality. Catch that great opening hook when I thought a boyish nightmare was coming true. The plot's something about our scary trio wanting to produce modern horror features, but do the old tricks still work. They disagree, but who's correct—it's Frankenstein Karloff versus Madman Lorre and Wolfman Chaney.

Okay, the story's just an excuse to get three movie icons on screen together. But what's with the Molly (Riley) bit. It looks like she's practicing for Queen of Coy, especially in that one lengthy close- up scene that almost comes across as padding. Nonetheless, she is endearing even if excessive. And, oh yes, there's a ton of fashionable girls (executive secretaries) for Buz and Tod to ogle, (and me too). Also shouldn't overlook two supporting old timers, Hunt and Nagel, who lend waspish class. All in all, the hour's as much a treat now as it was then. My only complaint is that the icons should have been favored with a curtain-call bow; somehow that seems appropriate even now.
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