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(2006)

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‘I Carry You With Me’: Film Review

  • Variety
‘I Carry You With Me’: Film Review
Winner of both prizes awarded in the Next category of the 2020 Sundance Film Festival, “I Carry You With Me” tells the true story of an undocumented gay couple from Mexico who risk their lives for love, liberty and the American Dream. Making her first foray into narrative filmmaking, documentary helmer Heidi Ewing began the project as a vérité portrait of her real-life subjects, Ivan and Gerardo, but cast actors to play the two men in reenactments of their early life — both as children and later, at the moment they met and fell in love.

Lgbtq movies out of Mexico are rare, and the idea to combine two styles of filmmaking is unique, but Ewing’s approach needs more cohesiveness. The narrative scenes are shot in a way that makes it hard to stay committed throughout, and the actors don’t seem to be playing the same two people we’re
See full article at Variety »

When the ‘Jesus Camp’ Director Struggled to Finish a Doc, She Transformed It Into Her Narrative Debut

When the ‘Jesus Camp’ Director Struggled to Finish a Doc, She Transformed It Into Her Narrative Debut
Sometimes a story just begs to be told. Documentary filmmaker Heidi Ewing (Oscar-nominated “Jesus Camp”) thought she knew her good friends, Iván and his partner Gerardo, who she met in a lower Manhattan neighborhood bar in 2005. The Spanish-speaking Ewing (thanks to an Cuban old boyfriend) hung out socially with them, danced salsa, and they came to her wedding in 2007.

But eight years ago at Pizza Noodle on Main Street, when “Detropia” played Sundance, the couple told her more of their history. “There were dimensions to my friends I didn’t know existed,” she told me on the phone as she waited for her reps to close a deal with Sony Pictures Classics for her first narrative feature, “I Carry You With Me.” She wrote and directed this true romance about her friends today, as well as “a past that shaped them in so many ways.”

Their story haunted Ewing, as
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

When the ‘Jesus Camp’ Director Struggled to Finish a Doc, She Transformed It Into Her Narrative Debut

When the ‘Jesus Camp’ Director Struggled to Finish a Doc, She Transformed It Into Her Narrative Debut
Sometimes a story just begs to be told. Documentary filmmaker Heidi Ewing (Oscar-nominated “Jesus Camp”) thought she knew her good friends, Iván and his partner Gerardo, who she met in a lower Manhattan neighborhood bar in 2005. The Spanish-speaking Ewing (thanks to an Cuban old boyfriend) hung out socially with them, danced salsa, and they came to her wedding in 2007.

But eight years ago at Pizza Noodle on Main Street, when “Detropia” played Sundance, the couple told her more of their history. “There were dimensions to my friends I didn’t know existed,” she told me on the phone as she waited for her reps to close a deal with Sony Pictures Classics for her first narrative feature, “I Carry You With Me.” She wrote and directed this true romance about her friends today, as well as “a past that shaped them in so many ways.”

Their story haunted Ewing, as
See full article at Indiewire »

‘I Carry You With Me’: A Beautiful Gay Love Story Makes An Unfortunate Creative Turn [Sundance Review]

Park City – There is a beautiful love story at the center of “I Carry You With Me (Te Llevo Conmigo)” which debuted Sunday at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival. It’s not only moving, but it’s remarkably based on the lives of two real-life people. Heidi Ewing, an Oscar-nominated filmmaker for the documentary “Jesus Camp,” makes her narrative debut chronicling this unique story, a tale that could have been a gay romance for the ages. Instead, Ewing makes a creative decision in the final act of the picture which simply sucks all the air out of the room. It’s almost unbelievable how wrong that decision turned out to be and I’m flummoxed to recall any other film that made such a wrong turn.

Continue reading ‘I Carry You With Me’: A Beautiful Gay Love Story Makes An Unfortunate Creative Turn [Sundance Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Kim Rozenfeld Steps Down As Apple Head Of Current Programming & Unscripted, Segues To First-Look Deal

  • Deadline
Exclusive: Following the November 1 launch of Apple TV+, the streamer is realigning its executive ranks under toppers Zack Van Amburg and Jamie Erlicht, combining development and current into a single-executive structure.

Kim Rozenfeld is leaving as head of current scripted programming and docu/unscripted content. He will return to his producing roots with a first-look deal at Apple for his company Half Full Productions.

Apple TV+ head of scripted development Matt Cherniss will now also oversee current scripted series. Molly Thompson, who joined Apple as Head of Documentaries in April, reporting to Rozenfeld, will continue to oversee documentary film and series programming, development and current.

Former Sony TV head of current programming Rozenfeld was one of the first executive hires after Van Amburg and Erlicht left Sony TV in 2017 to lead worldwide video programming for Apple.

Before joining Sony TV as Evp Current Programming in 2011, Rozenfeld was a scripted series producer based at ABC Studios,
See full article at Deadline »

Apple names producer Molly Thompson head of documentaries

Thompson founded A&E IndieFilms and has a string of documentary producing credits.

Molly Thompson, the founder of A&E IndieFilms and executive producer of documentary films including Jesus Camp, Life, Animated and City of Ghosts, has joined Apple as the tech giant’s head of documentaries.

Thompson founded A&E IndieFilms, feature production arm of Us cable channel company A+E Networks, where she also served as head of documentary films.

A&E IndieFilms releases have included the Watergate docuseries, Sundance entry Studio 54, Cartel Land and Murderball. Thompson also served as executive producer on The Tillman Story and The Imposter
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Apple names producer Molly Thompson head of documentaries

Thompson founded A&E IndieFilms and has a string of documentary producing credits.

Molly Thompson, the founder of A&E IndieFilms and executive producer of documentary films including Jesus Camp, Life, Animated and City of Ghosts, has joined Apple as the tech giant’s head of documentaries.

Thompson founded A&E IndieFilms, feature production arm of Us cable channel company A+E Networks, where she also served as head of documentary films.

A&E IndieFilms releases have included the Watergate docuseries, Sundance entry Studio 54, Cartel Land and Murderball. Thompson also served as executive producer on The Tillman Story and The Imposter
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Apple Hires Molly Thompson as Head of Documentaries

  • Variety
Apple Hires Molly Thompson as Head of Documentaries
Molly Thompson has joined Apple’s upcoming streaming service as its head of documentaries.

Thompson previously founded A&E Indie Films, the feature film production unit of A+E Networks. She was also previously the head of documentary films for A+E Networks. Recent documentaries she has executive produced include “The Clinton Affair,” Charles Ferguson’s “Watergate” docuseries, “Studio 54,” and “City of Ghosts.” She was also an executive producer on celebrated documentaries like “Life, Animated,” “Cartel Land,” “Murderball,” and “Jesus Camp.”

She also executive produced Amir Bar-Lev’s “The Tillman Story” and Bart Layton’s “The Imposter,” as well as two narrative features for Lifetime Films. Those were “Lila & Eve,” starring Viola Davis and Jennifer Lopez, and “Paris Can Wait,” starring Diane Lane and Alec Baldwin.

Additionally, Thompson served as executive producer on all feature films produced under the History Films banner, including Werner Herzog’s “Meeting Gorbachev” and “Cave of Forgotten Dreams,
See full article at Variety »

A&E’s Molly Thompson Joins Apple As Head Of Documentaries

  • Deadline
Apple has hired A&E IndieFilms founder Molly Thompson as Head of Documentaries.

Thompson, who also served as Head of Documentary films for A+E Networks, has executive produced such projects as The Clinton Affair; the docuseries Watergate; City of Ghosts; Life, Animated; Cartel Land; Murderball; and Jesus Camp.

Thompson served as executive producer on all feature films produced under the History Films banner, including Werner Herzog’s Meeting Gorbachev — which will have its premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival — and Cave of Forgotten Dreams, Janet Tobias’ No Place on Earth, Errol Morris’ The Unknown Known: The Life and Times of Donald Rumsfeld, Douglas Tirola’s Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story of the National Lampoon and the Johnny Knoxville-produced Being Evel.

Among other projects, Thompson also Ep’d Amir Bar-Lev’s Emmy-winning The Tillman Story, Bart Layton’s BAFTA-winning The Imposter and two narrative features for Lifetime Films: Lila & Eve,
See full article at Deadline »

“To Dominate out of Fear is Our Worst Characteristic as Humans”: Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady on Their Oscar-Shortlisted One of Us

Directing partners Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady — selected for Filmmaker‘s 25 New Faces in 2005 — first came on to the filmmaking scene with heartfelt documentaries The Boys of Baraka and Oscar-nominated Jesus Camp. In their latest documentary One of Us, currently available on Netflix and just shortlisted for the Best Documentary Academy Award, their signature cinema verite style of filmmaking unveiled a level of suspense and drama they were not expecting. Centered around three people who are attempting to leave the tight reigns of their New York-based Hasidic Jewish communities, the film goes deep inside an overly controlling, […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Doc NYC 2017: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See At the Festival, From ‘EuroTrump’ to ‘David Bowie: The Last Five Years’

  • Indiewire
Doc NYC 2017: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See At the Festival, From ‘EuroTrump’ to ‘David Bowie: The Last Five Years’
New York City’s annual Doc NYC festival kicks off this week, including a full-to-bursting slate of some of this year’s most remarkable documentaries. If you’ve been looking to beef up on your documentary consumption, Doc NYC is the perfect chance to check out a wide variety of some of the year’s best fact-based features. Ahead, we pick out 14 of our most anticipated films from the fest, including some awards contenders, a handful of buzzy debuts, and a number of festival favorites. Take a look and start filling up your schedule now.

Doc NYC runs November 9 – 16 in New York City.

EuroTrump

Donald Trump may seem like a sui generis figure, a one-of-a-kind monster who was forged in a perfect storm of racism, tweets, and chaos, but history suggests that he’s really just a new breed of an old type. You don’t even have to look
See full article at Indiewire »

‘One of Us’ Review: Hasidic Jews Survive After Leaving Religious Life in Fascinating Documentary

‘One of Us’ Review: Hasidic Jews Survive After Leaving Religious Life in Fascinating Documentary
There are no talking heads in “One of Us,” Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s expertly crafted portrait of three ex-Hasidic Jews adjusting to secular life. Refreshingly, the interviews in this tense documentary take place on the move; there is a restless energy to the way Luzer drives around Los Angeles in search of auditions, or Etty’s furtive glances through shuttered blinds. The three subjects of “One of Us” are always looking over their shoulders, whether in precaution of real threats or just to make sense of the brave new world in which they find themselves.

Centering on only three subjects, Ewing and Grady keep the film’s focus narrow and intimately human. Luzer is the most charismatic of the bunch; an aspiring actor who got his start playing Hasidic characters, he learned about the secular world as a teenager by secretly watching movies in his car. “The plan
See full article at Indiewire »

Doc Corner: 'One of Us' and 'Thy Father's Chair'

by Glenn Dunks

Not content to let scientology corner the market in controversial religion exposes, directors Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady focus their attention on New York’s Hasidic community in their latest feature. A dramatic change of pace after last year’s celebrity bio-doc Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You, the filmmakers return at least somewhat to the themes of their most famous film, the Oscar-nominated Jesus Camp. Yet despite the potential cross-over to be found in the pair that seek to uncover the alarming practises of organised religion, One of Us is a much different beast.

Unlike that earlier film, which trained its cameras on the inner-circle of a camp for raising the next generation of evangelicals, One of Us observes from the outside, following the stories of three individuals who have attempted to extract themselves from the community and tell some often haunting and traumatic tales of their times within it.
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘Perfect Bid’ Trailer: How A Math Teacher From Texas Outsmarted ‘The Price Is Right’ — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘Perfect Bid’ Trailer: How A Math Teacher From Texas Outsmarted ‘The Price Is Right’ — Watch
Those who’ve been to a live studio taping know how exhausting they are. To sit in the audience, you need to show up five hours before the taping. You get a number and are told to leave and come back an hour before. Then, the interns line everybody up according to their number and shuffle the audience inside. The actual taping isn’t short, either. It takes about three to five hours, depending on the show. It’s a full day experience, and not necessarily too pleasant when you don’t expect to win anything.

So why did Ted Slauson, a math teacher from Texas, attend “The Price Is Right” 37 times? Well, he didn’t do it because he liked to spend his Mondays waiting around in a cold studio.

Read More:‘Face Places’ Clip: Agnes Varda Goes Off Subject in Charming Look at Latest Documentary — Watch

Perfect Bid: The Contestant Who Knew Too Much
See full article at Indiewire »

Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Rachel Grady — “One of Us”

“One of Us”

Rachel Grady is a filmmaker and co-owns New York’s Loki Films with Heidi Ewing. She and Ewing have have directed six feature-length films, including “Jesus Camp,” “The Boys of Baraka,” “12th & Delaware,” “Detropia,” and “Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You.” The latter was recently nominated for an Emmy alongside PBS’ “American Masters.”

“One of Us” will premiere at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival on September 10. The film is co-directed by Ewing.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Rg: “One of Us” is a cinéma vérité deep dive into the lives of three individuals who have chosen to leave or have been pushed out of the enormously insular world of Hasidic Judaism. The film offers unique and intimate access to the lives of all three as they deal not only with questions of their beliefs but also the consequences of leaving the only community they have ever known. Freedom will cost them. The question is, what’s the price?

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Rg: First and foremost: curiosity. If you’re going to be living with a story for several years, it’s got to be something that’s meaty and has a lot of directions to move in. Also, I can say with confidence that New Yorkers are obsessed with the Hasidic community.

We then learned about Footsteps, a support group for people leaving the Hasidic community, and the idea of people starting from scratch in a secular society has inherent stakes. These people are essentially willing to give everything up in order to explore their own identities. There’s something so universal about that, something that surpassed even the idea of this being a religious community. Not fitting in at some point in one’s life is something a lot of people can identify with.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Rg: I think that the film is going to speak to a lot of people. Everyone’s had a time in their life when they felt like an outcast. I also hope that people will start thinking about the judicial system, because we have an example of it — in my opinion — going horribly wrong in the film and I’m hoping that is brought to light.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Rg: There were daily challenges. This is a community that at its very core doesn’t want the outside world to know anything about them. We were able to get some access through our subjects, but they are also on the outs with the Hasidic community. Therein lies an intrinsic conflict that we spent the better half of three years facing.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Rg: We initially received a generous grant from Artemis Rising and were able to get the ball rolling and experiment with what the film could and should be. Netflix saw some early material and came onboard with the full budget. They’ve been a wonderful creative partner.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at the Toronto International Film Festival?

Rg: In 15 years as filmmakers we’ve never had a film at Tiff! We’re so thrilled to have our premiere here, and so excited to share with Canadians. We’ve screened other work at special events in Toronto over the years and the people of this city are wonderful and engaged. It’s an excellent way to start the public life of the film.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Rg: Best advice: Trust yourself.

Worst advice: Just “wing it” when giving a wedding toast. Don’t do that.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Rg: Don’t apologize. It’s something that to this day I have to remind myself of daily. It’s reflexive for women, and I’m over it.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Rg: I have a great many I love. Right now it’s Patty Jenkins’ “Wonder Woman.” I started to cry when Wonder Woman charged across No Man’s Land into the hands of grave danger. It touched me deeply.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Rg: Yes, I’m optimistic. See my above answer. Patty helmed a film that will make over a billion dollars. More opportunities mean more women gaining more confidence. Critical mass is inevitable. Infuriatingly slow — but inevitable.

Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Rachel Grady — “One of Us” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’ Season 3′ Trailer: Hell Hath No Fury Like Rachel Bloom Scorned — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’ Season 3′ Trailer: Hell Hath No Fury Like Rachel Bloom Scorned — Watch
Friday the 13th is supposed to be an unlucky day, but fans of “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” may disagree. Rachel Bloom’s romantic musical dramedy is set to return on that fateful night next month and, in its infinite wisdom, the CW has seen fit to release a new trailer and whet the appetites of everyone excited to once again immerse themselves in the glory that is West Covina, California. Watch below.

Read More:‘Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’ Co-Creator Aline Brosh McKenna on the Song From the Show That’s Stuck In Her Head

Not much happens in the 30-second spot, which sees its scorned heroine wearing the robe and beanie that were meant to celebrate her nuptials and looking especially, well, crazy. Ominous onscreen text assures us that she’ll go “to the extreme” this time around.

Read More:‘Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’: Rachel Bloom Doesn’t Care If You Consider Her in New
See full article at Indiewire »

Trailer Watch: Three People Struggle to Leave Hasidic Judaism in Heidi Ewing & Rachel Grady’s “One…

Trailer Watch: Three People Struggle to Leave Hasidic Judaism in Heidi Ewing & Rachel Grady’s “One of Us”“One of Us”

“I called my mom and I said, ‘Hey, Mom. Can I talk to you?’” recalls Luzer, a subject of Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s upcoming documentary “One of Us.” “I said, ‘I’m not religious anymore.’ She said, ‘Okay.’ Then she just hung up and then we didn’t speak for seven years.”

The doc follows Luzer and two other subjects as they struggle to rebuild their lives after leaving Hasidic Judaism. Not only do they have to acclimate themselves to the modern secular world — Ari explains that he was initially confused by Google — they have to contend with family and friends who aren’t happy to see them go. Etty, for example, faces threats of violence from her husband’s family after she leaves the community.

Per the “One of Us’” official synopsis: “The film follows Etty, a mother of seven, as she decides to leave a violent marriage and divorce her husband; Ari, a teenager on the verge of manhood who is struggling with addiction and the effects of childhood abuse; and Luzer, an actor who, despite having found success in the secular world, still wrestles with his decision eight years earlier to leave the Hasidic community. Produced over three years, ‘One of Us’ offers unique and intimate access to the lives of all three as they deal not only with questions of their beliefs but also with the consequences of leaving the only community they have ever known.”

In a soon-to-be-published interview, Grady told us that she and Ewing were drawn to the film partially because of Footsteps, a support group for those leaving the Hasidic community. “These people are essentially willing to give everything up in order to explore their own identities,” she said. “There’s something so universal about that, something that surpassed even the idea of this being a religious community. Not fitting in at some point in one’s life is something a lot of people can identify with.”

Ewing and Grady have previously directed six feature-length films together, including “Jesus Camp,” “Detropia,” and “Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You.”

“One of Us” will make its world premiere at Tiff on September 10. It will be available on Netflix and screen in select theaters beginning October 20. Check out the trailer and poster below.

https://medium.com/media/17048c8ba25f6f245d30c9fab70c1e27/href

Trailer Watch: Three People Struggle to Leave Hasidic Judaism in Heidi Ewing & Rachel Grady’s “One… was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘I Am Another You’ Trailer: Nanfu Wang’s Award-Winning Documentary Takes An Unexpected Turn — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘I Am Another You’ Trailer: Nanfu Wang’s Award-Winning Documentary Takes An Unexpected Turn — Watch
When Chinese filmmaker Nanfu Wang — best known to most audiences for her shortlisted documentary “Hooligan Sparrow” — arrived in America, she was possessed by some unique notions regarding certain parts of her newly adopted homeland. For Wang, Florida was “an exotic frontier full of theme parks, prehistoric swamp creatures, and sunburned denizens.”

Ever searching and investigative, Wang took those ideas straight to the source, traveling to Florida and exploring. Once there, she discovered an unlikely subject, and an even more unlikely hero.

Read More:20 Female Directors Who Will Rule This Fall Festival Season, Including Agnes Varda, Greta Gerwig, Dee Rees, and More

As Wang recently told IndieWire, “Every year since I was 20, I’ve given myself the same birthday gift — a last-minute trip to a place I’ve never visited before. On my birthday in 2012 — the first year I lived in NYC, I bought a one-way ticket to Florida. Little did I know,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘One of Us’ Trailer: ‘Jesus Camp’ Directors Go Inside Another Insular Religious Community — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘One of Us’ Trailer: ‘Jesus Camp’ Directors Go Inside Another Insular Religious Community — Watch
Jesus Camp” and “Detropia” documentarian duo Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady return to familiar territory in their latest feature, a Netflix original that will premiere this week at Tiff before going on to the streaming giant later this fall. The new film sees the pair going inside yet an insular community, all in hopes of illuminating without judgement.

Filmed over the course of three years, the film follows a trio of Hasidic Jews, all struggling to break away from the only world they’ve ever known. From actor Luzer, still reeling from the effects of leaving the fold nearly a decade earlier, to teenager Ari, haunted by years of abuse, the film turns a sensitive eye on its subjects and their struggles. But its housewife Etty, a mother of seven who initially seeks to leave her violent husband before discovering the shocking fallout of her choice, that will likely set audiences alight.
See full article at Indiewire »

Tiff 2017: 20 Films We Can’t Wait to See, From ‘mother!’ to ‘The Shape of Water’ and Many More

  • Indiewire
Tiff 2017: 20 Films We Can’t Wait to See, From ‘mother!’ to ‘The Shape of Water’ and Many More
The Toronto International Film Festival kicks off this week, and with it, the rest of a very busy fall festival season. In preparation for the lauded festival, we’ve hand-picked 20 films we can’t wait to see, from the starriest of premieres to the most unexpected of offerings. Check them out below.

“mother!”

Darren Aronofsky has veered off in many unpredictable directions over the years, but at his core, he’s a master at subverting the horror/thriller genres: From “Pi” to “Black Swan,” the filmmaker excels at taking his stories in creepy, unpredictable directions in which it’s hard to tell how much we can believe onscreen — and whether his characters have lost their minds. That mode certainly seems to be in play for “mother!”, which appears to be a “Rosemary’s Baby”-like tale of a married couple (Jennifer Laurence and Javier Bardem) whose home is infiltrated by
See full article at Indiewire »
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