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Paris, je t'aime (2006)

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Through the neighborhoods of Paris, love is veiled, revealed, imitated, sucked dry, reinvented and awakened.

Writers:

Tristan Carné (original idea), Emmanuel Benbihy (transitions) | 30 more credits »
3 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Fanny Ardant ... Fanny (segment "Pigalle")
Julie Bataille Julie Bataille ... Julie (segment "Tuileries")
Leïla Bekhti ... Zarka (segment "Quais de Seine")
Melchior Derouet Melchior Derouet ... Thomas (segment "Faubourg Saint-Denis") (as Melchior Beslon)
Juliette Binoche ... Suzanne (segment "Place des Victoires")
Seydou Boro Seydou Boro ... Hassan (segment "Place des Fetes")
Steve Buscemi ... Le touriste (segment "Tuileries")
Sergio Castellitto ... Le mari (segment "Bastille")
Willem Dafoe ... Le cowboy (segment "Place des Victoires")
Gérard Depardieu ... Le patron (segment "Quartier Latin")
Cyril Descours Cyril Descours ... François (segment "Quais de Seine")
Lionel Dray Lionel Dray ... Ken (segment "Quartier des Enfants Rouges")
Marianne Faithfull ... Marianne (segment "Le Marais")
Ben Gazzara ... Ben (segment "Quartier Latin")
Hippolyte Girardot ... Le père (segment "Place des Victoires")
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Storyline

Paris, je t'aime is about the plurality of cinema in one mythic location: Paris, the City of Love. Twenty filmmakers have five minutes each; the audience must weave a single narrative out of twenty moments. The 20 moments are fused by transitional interstitial sequences and also via the introduction and epilogue. Each transition begins with the last shot of the previous film and ends with the first shot of the following film, extending the enchantment and the emotion of the previous segment, preparing the audience for a surprise, and providing a cohesive atmosphere. There's a reappearing mysterious character who is a witness to the Parisian life. A common theme of Paris and love fuses all. Written by Emmanuel Benbihy

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Stories of love from the heart of the city See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and brief drug use | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Language:

French | English | Spanish | Mandarin | Arabic

Release Date:

15 June 2007 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Paris, je t'aime See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$13,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$39,242, 6 May 2007, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$4,857,376, 5 August 2007
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This is the first feature film fully scanned in 6K and mastered in 4K in Europe (as opposed to the normal 2K). Encoding the image took about 24 hours per reel (at Laboratoires Éclair). See more »

Goofs

In "Bastille", when Marie-Christine receives Sergio's text message, you can see the text cursor blinking. This shows that the text was actually written on Marie-Christine's phone. See more »

Quotes

Fanny Forestier: [in French] Kiss me on impulse! Surprise me!
Bob Leander: Me, me, me, me! You always want your feelings understood! But mine are childish! Sex isn't disgusting unless you make it disgusting! There can be beauty in this place too!
Fanny Forestier: [in French] Not what I call beauty!
Bob Leander: I need a little help! You don't know what it's like for a man when it's all gone! I can't feel anything anymore!
Fanny Forestier: [slaps him] Do you feel *that*?
Bob Leander: [turning to the stripper] What do you charge to watch an argument?
See more »

Connections

References Damnation (1988) See more »

Soundtracks

Gangsta Street
Written by Jefferson Chambers
(P) and (C) K Musik / KPM Music
See more »

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User Reviews

Paris, mostly from directors who miss the point
7 December 2007 | by vandino1See all my reviews

Sadly, this is an awful grab bag of mostly trivial stories. Certainly it is ambitious and interesting as a concept, and Paris looks beautiful, but the producers didn't rein in the directors and what appears winning in theory becomes a lazy mishmash in execution. Each director was given five minutes of screen time and two days to shoot their film. Almost all of the directors figured they could dispense with writers and do it themselves. A bit of ego, a bit of film school, and a misunderstanding that even five minutes of screen time requires a writer's hand, especially so since the short time frame demands concise story telling skills.

Indeed, some of these film makers, e.g. Christopher Doyle, have barely sat in a director's chair, much less be worth trumpeting as members of an extraordinary group of visionaries. And the concept involves love stories and the love for Paris. What connection is there with this concept and the filmography of Joel and Ethan Coen? In fact the heavy American and British presence seems more mercenary than visionary from the producing end of things. Ben Gazzara and Gena Rowlands playing two Americans finalizing their divorce in a restaurant could have been filmed in New York or Chicago and shipped over to France for attachment to the movie. Worse, this episode relegates a giant of French cinema, Gerard Depardieu, to the minuscule part of the restaurant owner. There's nothing wrong with having some stories about tourists and expatriates, but this collection relies far too much on it. The bulk of the Parisians in this film are relegated to background chatter and bit parts. Surprisingly, even the city is relegated to background fodder. It appears that almost none of the film makers have any sense of Paris, or what to do with it given the opportunity to make a small film there. Many take place in nondescript indoor locations, or in the case of the Elijah Wood episode, a meaningless dark street straight out of 'Sin City.' Story wise, this is a director's film. Therefore the writing is weak and in some cases almost non-existent. In the case of Cuaron's episode with Nick Nolte, even the direction is non-existent (almost entirely a long shot track of Nolte yakking away to his nubile daughter as they walk down a street -- once again, a heavy American element with no trace of Paris except some dialogue). Some of the vignettes have "punchlines", while others merely fade away or end pointless and lost. The two most "commercial" feature Steve Buscemi in a cartoonish skit in a Metro station, and an absurd tryst between Elijah Wood and a vampiress. Both stand out but for the wrong reasons. Buscemi is forced to say nothing throughout his episode, and to behave like a punching bag for no reason. At least it IS snappily directed, and makes its point and ends with an exclamation. But it's also more clichéd American-in-Paris tourism. The Wood vampiress story not only doesn't belong in this film, it is also extremely predictable as a vampire sketch.

Many of the other stories seem either a small part of a bigger film, or a made-up hodgepodge to fill five minutes. To each his own as to the merits of the results. Certainly this smörgåsbord provides enough promise in its theme to delight those who think they're getting a taste of Paris along with humanistic stories (rather than the usual gangster, spy, or sleaze films using the city for its location). But I think the producers should have demanded that the directors adhere to the concept rather than allow them free rein to indulge in half-thought out skits that have only an arbitrary connection to the locations of the title city.


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