Two Women and Two Men (1912)

Feeling that the monotony of domesticity is somewhat irksome to him, James Thornwell casts about for some diversion. He meets Mlle. Valeria, a popular prima donna with whom he becomes very ... See full summary »

Director:

Van Dyke Brooke

Writer:

Charles L. Gaskill (story) (as Charles Gaskill)
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Cast

Cast overview:
Edith Storey ... Mlle. Valeria
Earle Williams ... James Thornwell
Harry Northrup ... Harry Borden
Julia Swayne Gordon ... Mrs. Thornwell
Helene Costello ... Little Nellie Thornwell
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Storyline

Feeling that the monotony of domesticity is somewhat irksome to him, James Thornwell casts about for some diversion. He meets Mlle. Valeria, a popular prima donna with whom he becomes very much infatuated. She accepts his attentions with inward indifference. Thornwell is not the only one. Harry Borden, a man of the world, pays her most ardent court. They both send her flowers and other evidences of their admiration. She tries to keep each in ignorance of the other. One day Borden happening in just as Thornwell is leaving. He upbraids Valeria and finds a note which Thornwell sent with a box of roses. She tries to get the note from him but he keeps it. Acting well her part, she laughingly dismisses the matter and submissively kisses him goodbye. Thornwell, with his wife, attends a ball where they meet Borden and Valeria. While Borden is talking to Mrs. Thornwell, Valeria takes Mr. Thornwell's arm and walks off with him. Borden graciously offers Mrs. Thornwell his arm and escorts her to ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama | Romance

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 December 1912 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

It is indeed an admirable piece of artistry
23 April 2017 | by deickemeyerSee all my reviews

Charles Gaskill's work usually shows care and thoughtful handling of the scenario. In this picture, unusually interesting because of its contrasts, his knowledge of his craft and its possibilities is even more apparent than usual. It is indeed an admirable piece of artistry. We don't mean to imply that it lacks originality, but that wise criticism rather than inspiration is seen in it. The action strikes fire now and then; but the art of the players supplies it; that it gives them the chance is the writer's great merit. The story is harmed by the trite, happy ending in which a child plays the usual role and is the means of reuniting the parents. The character drawing is first class. Most interesting, perhaps, are the roles taken by Edith Story and Harry Northrup; the first, an unscrupulous actress (just woman) and the second, a young man about town (wise owl). Earl Williams plays the married man in the woman's snare and to Julia S. Gordon is left the role of wronged wife and mother. It was ably produced by Van Dyke Brook. - The Moving Picture World, January 11, 1913


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