American Masters (1985– )
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Hitchcock, Selznick and the End of Hollywood 

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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Episode credited cast:
David O. Selznick ... Himself (archive footage)
Alfred Hitchcock ... Himself (archive footage)
Peter Bogdanovich ... Himself.
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Judith Anderson ... (archive footage)
Ingrid Bergman ... (archive footage)
Raymond Burr ... (archive footage)
Leo G. Carroll ... (archive footage)
Michael Chekhov ... (archive footage)
Paula Cohen Paula Cohen ... Herself
Joan Fontaine ... (archive footage)
Cary Grant ... (archive footage)
Gene Hackman ... Himself - Narrator (voice)
Lois Hanby Lois Hanby ... Herself
Al Hirschfeld Al Hirschfeld ... Himself
Louis Jordan ... (archive footage)
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

1 November 1999 (USA) See more »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Trivia

The episode won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Nonfiction Series. See more »

Connections

Features Blackmail (1929) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Which End of Hollywood?
27 September 1999 | by SijmenSee all my reviews

The documentary takes the fight between director Hitchcock and producer Selznick over the control of the films they're making and uses it as a symbol of the end of Hollywood, meaning that during their collaboration and after that, the power of the producer decreased on behalf of the director's, and 'great producing' as Selznick did on Gone with the Wind was gone with the wind.

As far as I know producers and directors still fight during every stage of production, so I don't really see why Hollywood has 'ended' in that perspective.

End or no end, the documentary tries hard not to stick at the facts and gives us a psychological rapport of what those two men where thinking and what drove them. It is not bad done, but it's explained to us as we are a class full of stupid (really stupid) children.

Nevertheless, it has some interesting images of Hitchcock and Selznick you never saw before and you probably never will see again, and in the end that was the reason why I watched this anyway.


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