6.0/10
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2 user 3 critic

A Hollywood Detour (1942)

This cartoon, featuring a running-gag throughout of a John Barrymore caricature being mobbed by fan for an autograph, is a burlesqued tour of Hollywood. The narrator conducts a tourist tour... See full summary »

Director:

Frank Tashlin

Writer:

Frank Tashlin (story)

Star:

Paul Frees
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Cast

Uncredited cast:
Paul Frees ... Narrator (uncredited)
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Storyline

This cartoon, featuring a running-gag throughout of a John Barrymore caricature being mobbed by fan for an autograph, is a burlesqued tour of Hollywood. The narrator conducts a tourist tour all around the town of Hollywood Boulvevard, Malibu Beach, Santa Anita Race Track, the Brown Derby, and Grauman's Chinese theatre. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

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Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 January 1942 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Paul Frees' first screen credit. See more »

Connections

Edited from The Mad Hatter (1940) See more »

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User Reviews

 
On the Noses
1 July 2015 | by bobliptonSee all my reviews

Frank Tashlin's time as head of Columbia's cartoon division did not last long, but he directed some fine cartoons while he was there. This rarely seen example is a typical genre of cartoons in this period, with caricatures of Hollywood stars offered in a blackout gag structure. The stars shown are most those seen since the early 1930s, although such Columbia talent as Rita Hayworth, cast members of the BLONDIE series and the Three Stooges get their time on screen. We also get to hear Paul Frees as the narrator in his first credited screen appearance.

The pictures look like Tashlin's work at Schlesinger's unit, although the lush color is unusual for him. When he returned to Schlesinger, he worked on the unit's last black and white efforts. However, there are a couple of the extreme point-of-view shots he was fond of; his framing was the most realistic of cartoon directors, just as when he directed live-action movies, his players acted in a very cartoony fashion.


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