Wings of Desire (1987) - News Poster

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Film Review: ‘Above the Shadows’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘Above the Shadows’
Grief-fueled romantic fantasies can be tricky for filmmakers not named Wim Wenders. Everyone aspires to make “Wings of Desire” with its stirring immediacy, beautiful imagery and pressing poignancy, but most wind up delivering something closer to its decent but dreary American remake, “City of Angels” — which could also be said for writer-director Claudia Myers’ “Above the Shadows.” This magical-realist fairy tale, about a young woman feeling so isolated and insignificant after a tragic loss that she’s literally invisible to everyone except one other struggling soul, is certainly imaginative and intelligent in its ideas. However, the savvy smarts within don’t quite sustain the running time and, much like its protagonist, the film becomes transparent in its motives and sentimentality.

Holly was extremely close to her mom Victoria (Maria Dizzia) growing up. As a middle child sandwiched in between two siblings who outshined her in brains and beauty, Holly felt insecure,
See full article at Variety »

Song You Need To Know: Joan Shelley, ‘Coming Down For You’

Joan Shelley sees Kentucky as her nest. But looking for fresh perspective, she decided to work on new music in Reykjavik, Iceland, at Greenhaus Studios. “Coming Down For You” suggests it worked out quite well. The sound will be familiar territory to fans of her six previous albums (not counting three with string band Maiden Radio). It moves at a cantoring pace, weaving a spell with banjo and electric guitars; virtuosos Nathan Salsburg and James Elkington both contribute; while frequent Shelley foil Bonnie “Prince” Billy wraps her in weathered harmony
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Hollywood Flashback: Wenders' 'Wings of Desire' Soared at Cannes in 1987

Hollywood Flashback: Wenders' 'Wings of Desire' Soared at Cannes in 1987
Wim Wenders did not win the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 1987 for Wings of Desire. Nor did he have the most famous quote to emerge that year from the festival. Those honors went to Maurice Pialat, who won the top prize for the French film Sous le Soleil de Satan (Under the Sun of Satan). When the director was given the award by Catherine Deneuve, the crowd booed. "If you can say you don’t like me," responded Pialat, "then I can say that I don’t like you either." (Why the film was so unpopular is ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Handcrafting from scratch by Anne-Katrin Titze

Cindy Hulej on Only Lovers Left Alive: "I relate a lot to that movie on multiple levels. And for Paterson I customised the guitar in that." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

While I was talking with Rick Kelly at his work bench in the back of the shop of Carmine Street Guitars, Ed Bahlman was having a lively conversation with Cindy Hulej on music. The Boys Next Door, The Birthday Party, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, Blixa Bargeld, Rowland S Howard and Wim Wenders' Wings Of Desire were being discussed.

Cindy told me that she customised a guitar for Golshifteh Farahani to play in Jim Jarmusch's Paterson, which also starred Adam Driver. Driver is now in New York tearing up the stage opposite Keri Russell in the Broadway revival of Lanford Wilson's Burn This, directed by Michael Mayer, and he will soon be seen in Jarmusch's Cannes Film
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

The Best of Movie Poster of the Day: Part 20

  • MUBI
In the past four months or so since I last did this, the following on my @movieposterofthday (leave off the last e for elegance) Instagram has more than tripled, which makes this best-of round-up more competitive. Sadly, as is often the case, a lot of my posts were occasioned by the passing of an actor or director, or, in the case of the most popular poster yet, by a composer. The lovely two-color American half sheet for The Umbrellas of Cherbourg was posted in honor of Michel Legrand, who passed away in January at 86 just the day after Serbian director Dušan Makavejev, who was also 86 and whose ribald German poster for Sweet Movie also made the top 20. Other passings recognized were Stanley Donen (with a Japanese Funny Face), Nicolas Roeg (a Us Performance), and Bruno Ganz (a French Wings of Desire). It’s impossible to tell if people are liking
See full article at MUBI »

Movie Poster of the Week: The Illustrated Bruno Ganz

  • MUBI
Bruno Ganz, who died last week at the age of 77, had 121 acting credits to his name, from his debut as a hotel page in the 1960 comedy The Man in the Black Derby to his final role as a judge in Terrence Malick’s yet to be released Radegund. His underworld guide in Lars von Trier’s The House that Jack Built would have been at the very least a fitting send-off, but since that film premiered in Cannes last year he has also played Sigmund Freud in The Tobacconist and starred in a Macedonian war crimes drama, I Witness. Born in Zurich, to Swiss and Italian parents, Ganz was a truly international star, working with Wim Wenders, Werner Herzog, and Volker Schlöndorff in Germany, but also Eric Rohmer, Jerzy Skolimowski, Alain Tanner, Gillian Armstrong, Jonathan Demme, Theo Angelopoulos, Francis Ford Coppola, Ridley Scott, Atom Egoyan, Barbet Schroeder, Bille August, Sally Potter,
See full article at MUBI »

Bruno Ganz: He Played Hitler and a Hovering Angel, But Was Most Memorable When Caught Between Good and Evil

  • Variety
Bruno Ganz: He Played Hitler and a Hovering Angel, But Was Most Memorable When Caught Between Good and Evil
A lot of people probably don’t know it, but when the superb Swiss actor Bruno Ganz, who died Friday at 77, took on the role that brought him his greatest jolt of fame, playing Adolf Hitler in “Downfall,” it was one of the most paradoxical casting choices in modern movies. Ganz, portraying Hitler in the final days of World War II, when the Führer was trapped in his bunker, did an impersonation of Hitler at his most full-throttle fulminating. The performance was raging, antic, operatic, possessed; it was true homicidal acting. (That’s one reason why “Downfall” became the movie that launched a thousand Hitler Internet memes.)

Yet up until then, that kind of smash-mouth volatility had almost nothing to do with the persona of Bruno Ganz. He was sly, pensive, puckish yet woeful, inwardly commanding, almost always intensely becalmed, an actor with a light in his eye that could
See full article at Variety »

Berlin Film Festival 2019 Winners: Nadav Lapid’s ‘Synonyms’ Takes Golden Bear; Full List Of Winners

  • Deadline
Berlin Film Festival 2019 Winners: Nadav Lapid’s ‘Synonyms’ Takes Golden Bear; Full List Of Winners
Updated with full list of winners: The Berlin Film Festival crowned its winners tonight at a ceremony in the Berlinale Palast. Big winners included Synonyms (Synonymes), which took home the festival’s top prize Golden Bear for Best Film and By the Grace of God, which won the Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize. I Was at Home, But won the Best Director accolade, and there was a double hit in the acting categories for the Republic of China’s So Long, My Son, which won Best Actor for Wang Jingchun and Best Actress for Yong Mei. Scroll down for a full list of winners.

Golden Bear Best Film winner Synonyms, a French-German-Israeli co-production, was an early favorite at the festival, launching first-timer actor Tom Mercier in the breakout role of a young Israeli man who tries to reinvent himself in Paris, with the help of a Franco-Israeli dictionary that gives the film its title.
See full article at Deadline »

Berlin Film Festival 2019: Nadav Lapid’s ‘Synonyms’ Wins Golden Bear

  • Variety
Berlin Film Festival 2019: Nadav Lapid’s ‘Synonyms’ Wins Golden Bear
Israeli director Nadav Lapid’s “Synonyms,” about a young Israeli man in Paris who has turned his back on his native country, won the Golden Bear at this year’s Berlinale on Saturday.

The Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize went to François Ozon’s French drama “By the Grace of God,” a fact-based account of the Catholic Church sexual abuse scandal behind the ongoing trial of Philippe Barbarin, the archbishop of Lyon.

Accepting the award, Lapid said “Synonyms,” which stars Tom Mercier, would likely be considered “scandalous” in Israel and France – the pic skewers stereotypes from both nations – but added that it was ultimately a celebration.

In his review in Variety, Jay Weissberg wrote that the film takes “a Kalashnikov to the nation’s military culture and its carefully nurtured persecution complex.”

Thanking the Berlinale for selecting his film, Ozon said he did not know whether addressing child sexual abuse
See full article at Variety »

Bruno Ganz, Downfall's Hitler and Wings of Desire Star, Dies at 77

Bruno Ganz, Downfall's Hitler and Wings of Desire Star, Dies at 77
Swiss actor Bruno Ganz has passed away. He was 77 years old. Ganz was recently diagnosed with colon cancer and died at his home in Zurich on Friday, according to his agent, Patricia Baumbauer. The actor appeared in over 80 movies and TV shows over the span of his lengthy career, and is arguably best-known for playing a defeated Hitler in Downfall, which has since become a viral sensation. Ganz is also known for playing an angel in Wim Wenders' Wings of Desire.

Bruno Ganz won the Donatello Award for his performance in 2000's Bread and Tulips. The award is Italy's Academy Awards equivalent, and Ganz won for his role as a quiet, poetic waiter who bonds with a runaway homemaker. Most of Ganz's performances were for European movies and TV shows. In addition to working with Wim Wenders on Wings of Desire, the actor worked on the director's 1977 film noir homage,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Bruno Ganz dies by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2019-02-16 17:41:55

Bruno Ganz with Christopher Plummer in Atom Egoyan's Remember: "There was a beautiful stillness to his piercing intelligence ..."

Bruno Ganz died on February 15 at his home in Zurich at the age of 77. A star in three Wim Wenders films - Wings Of Desire; Faraway, So Close! and The American Friend' Ganz played the voice of death, Verge, in Lars von Trier's The House That Jack Built.

Atom Egoyan worked with Bruno Ganz, who played Rudy Kurlander #1 in Remember, which starred Martin Landau and Christopher Plummer. Atom sent the following tribute to me this morning.

"It was such an honour to work with this legendary actor. I will never forget the time we spent together, which I treasured. We talked a lot about theatre, and I always had the sense that the stage...
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Bruno Ganz, an Angel in ‘Wings of Desire’ and Hitler in ‘Downfall,’ Dies

  • Indiewire
Bruno Ganz, an Angel in ‘Wings of Desire’ and Hitler in ‘Downfall,’ Dies
Bruno Ganz, the revered Swiss actor best known for his portrayal of a love-sick angel in “Wings of Desire” and an endlessly memed Adolf Hitler in “Downfall,” has died. He was 77. Deadline reports that Ganz passed away from colon cancer at his home in Zürich yesterday. The thespian was a world-cinema mainstay for half a century, appearing in everything from “The American Friend” and “Nosferatu the Vampyre” to “The Reader” and “Unknown” throughout his singular career.

He became a favored collaborator of such auteurs as Werner Herzog, Wim Wenders, Éric Rohmer, and Francis Ford Coppola in the process, reprising his role as Damiel from Wenders’ “Wings of Desire” in 1993’s “Faraway, So Close!” Ganz was arguably even more acclaimed for his theatrical career, so much so that he held the Iffland-Ring — an honor passed from one performer to another reserved for the “most significant and most worthy actor of the German-speaking theatre.
See full article at Indiewire »

Bruno Ganz Dies: Swiss Actor In ‘Downfall’ Was 77

  • Deadline
Bruno Ganz Dies: Swiss Actor In ‘Downfall’ Was 77
Bruno Ganz, whose best-known roles were portraying the extremes of an angel and Adolph Hitler, died in Zurich at age 77 on Friday. His cause of death was colon cancer, according to representatives.

His memorable portrayal of German dictator Adolph Hitler in 2004’s Downfall was considered Ganz’s biggest role. But his appearance as an angel in the 1987 Wim Wenders film Wings of Desire also drew accolades. He later reprised that role in the 1993 follow, Faraway, So Close!

Among his other critically hailed roles included appearances in Stephen Daldry’s Oscar-nominated The Reader (2008), Werner Herzog’s Nosferatu, the Jonathan Demme remake of The Manchurian Candidate and Franklin J. Schaffner’s The Boys from Brazil.

But it was the role of Hitler that truly made Ganz. Some criticized him for humanizing the brutal dictator, but Ganz’s portrayal later became popular in the social media age, as clever meme creators gave people
See full article at Deadline »

Bruno Ganz, Swiss Actor Who Portrayed Hitler in ‘Downfall,’ Dead at 77

Bruno Ganz, Swiss Actor Who Portrayed Hitler in ‘Downfall,’ Dead at 77
Bruno Ganz, the renowned Swiss actor who portrayed Adolf Hitler in 2004’s Downfall and an angel in 1987’s Wings of Desire, died Friday at the age of 77.

The actor died at his home in Zurich, his management confirmed to the BBC, who added that Ganz reportedly suffered from colon cancer.

“Bruno Ganz was one of the greatest and most versatile actors ‘who inspired generations of film fans,’ the Berlinale Film Festival tweeted Saturday. “We are incredibly saddened by the loss of a long-standing festival companion and outstanding figure of the international film history.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Bruno Ganz, Star of ‘Downfall’ and ‘Wings of Desire,’ Dies at 77

  • Variety
Bruno Ganz, Star of ‘Downfall’ and ‘Wings of Desire,’ Dies at 77
Bruno Ganz, the Swiss actor best known for dramatizing Adolf Hitler’s final days in 2004’s “Downfall,” has died. He was 77.

Ganz died at his home in Zurich on Friday, his representatives told media outlets. The cause of death was reportedly colon cancer.

In addition to delivering one of the definitive cinematic portrayals of Hitler, Ganz played an angel who gives up immortality to experience earthly pleasures in Wim Wenders’ classic film “Wings of Desire” (1987). He reprised that role in Wenders’ 1993 follow-up, “Faraway, So Close!”

His celestial performance was so memorable that Ganz once recounted how people ascribed special powers to him when they recognized him in public.

“People in planes said: ‘Ah, no need to be afraid, because with you here, nothing can happen. Now we are safe,'” Ganz told the Danish film journal P.O.V. “Or a mother said to her child: ‘Look, there’s your guardian angel.
See full article at Variety »

Bruno Ganz, Star of ‘Downfall’ and ‘Wings of Desire,’ Dies at 77

  • Variety
Bruno Ganz, Star of ‘Downfall’ and ‘Wings of Desire,’ Dies at 77
Bruno Ganz, the Swiss actor best known for dramatizing Adolf Hitler’s final days in 2004’s “Downfall,” has died. He was 77.

Ganz died at his home in Zurich on Friday, his representatives told media outlets. The cause of death was reportedly colon cancer.

In addition to delivering one of the definitive cinematic portrayals of Hitler, Ganz played an angel who gives up immortality to experience earthly pleasures in Wim Wenders’ classic film “Wings of Desire” (1987). He reprised that role in Wenders’ 1993 follow-up, “Faraway, So Close!”

His celestial performance was so memorable that Ganz once recounted how people ascribed special powers to him when they recognized him in public.

“People in planes said: ‘Ah, no need to be afraid, because with you here, nothing can happen. Now we are safe,'” Ganz told the Danish film journal P.O.V. “Or a mother said to her child: ‘Look, there’s your guardian angel.
See full article at Variety »

Bruno Ganz, Who Played Hitler in ‘Downfall,’ Dies at 77

  • The Wrap
Bruno Ganz, Who Played Hitler in ‘Downfall,’ Dies at 77
Bruno Ganz, the Swiss actor whose work ranged from playing an angel in Wim Wenders’ “Wings of Desire” to an on-the-edge-of-defeat Adolf Hitler in the much-memed “Downfall,” has died at age 77.

He died at his home in Zurich on Friday after a diagnosis of colon cancer, his agent told France 24.

In his long career, Ganz appeared in more than 80 films and TV movies, mostly in Europe. He starred as a hit man opposite Dennis Hopper in Wenders’ 1977 film noir “The American Friend,” and then reteamed with the director a decade later for “Wings of Desire,” playing an angel sent to earth to comfort dying humans, who begins to long for humanity for himself.

Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2019 (Photos)

In Werner Herzog’s 1979 “Nosferatu the Vampyre,” Ganz played the human Jonathan Harker to Klaus Kinski’s otherworldly Dracula. And he starred as a Venice cafe worker who romances
See full article at The Wrap »

Film Review: ‘Berlin, I Love You’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘Berlin, I Love You’
If you truly love Berlin, and belong to the film industry, chances are you’re there right now attending the Berlinale, where roughly 400 movies unspool over 11 days. The Berlin Film Festival takes place annually in early February, one of the least pleasant times of year to experience a city where, in the half dozen instances I’ve been, someone always apologizes for the weather — with its rain, sleet, and iced-over streets — and helpfully suggests, “You really should come back in summer.”

And so, this year, I have no regrets sitting out the festival, choosing instead to visit the city vicariously via “Berlin, I Love You,” the latest in the “Cities of Love” series that gave us “Paris, je t’aime” and similar stopovers in New York and Rio. If you’ve seen any of those movies, you know the drill: The producers pick a glamorous international metropolis and invite a
See full article at Variety »

The 100 Greatest Achievements in Cinematography in the 20th Century, According to Asc

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the American Society of Cinematographers (Asc) this year, they’ve polled their members to determine 100 milestone films in the art and craft of cinematography of the 20th century. Topping the list is David Lean’s epic Lawrence of Arabia, shot by Freddie Young. Also in the top ten is Blade Runner (Jordan Cronenweth), The Conformist (Vittorio Storaro), Days of Heaven (Néstor Almendros), and more.

Organized by Steven Fierberg, he said “Asc members wanted to call attention to the most significant achievements of the cinematographer’s art but not refer to one achievement as ‘better’ than another. The selected films represent a range of styles, eras and visual artistry, but most importantly, it commemorates films that are inspirational or influential to Asc members and have exhibited enduring influence on generations of filmmakers.”

See the top 10 below, along with the full list.

1. Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Freddie Young,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Pope Francis’ Director Wim Wenders On His Charismatic Subject: “I Haven’t Seen Anybody Who Could Resist His Appeal”

  • Deadline
‘Pope Francis’ Director Wim Wenders On His Charismatic Subject: “I Haven’t Seen Anybody Who Could Resist His Appeal”
Pope Francis provoked criticism with his recents remarks about homosexuality, in which he told the author of a new book that men with “deep-seated” gay tendencies shouldn’t be admitted to seminaries. And he has also faced an insurrection from within the Vatican itself, over doctrinal issues and his handling of a sex abuse scandal involving a cardinal.

But the pontiff has found an ardent admirer in Academy Award-nominated director Wim Wenders, who returns to Oscar contention this year with his documentary Pope Francis: A Man of His Word. The film, which made more than $2 million at the domestic box office, came about after Monsignor Dario Viganò, then-director of the Vatican’s TV Center, reached out to Wenders with an offer of exclusive access to the pope.

“It turned out that Dario Viganò was a real cinephile,” Wenders tells Deadline by email. “He knew that cinema was a means of
See full article at Deadline »
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