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Skeleton on Hiding ‘Masked Singer’ Identity From Their Bff (Who You *Thought* Was Skeleton)

  • The Wrap
Skeleton on Hiding ‘Masked Singer’ Identity From Their Bff (Who You *Thought* Was Skeleton)
(Warning: This post contains spoilers for Wednesday’s episode of “The Masked Singer.”)

The identity of the dapper Skeleton on Fox’s “The Masked Singer” was revealed Wednesday night — and no, it wasn’t Martin Short, who was by far the leading guess by both the panelists and viewers offering up their thoughts on social media for the last few weeks.

Turns out the tuxedo-clad bone man was actually Paul Shaffer. And while you were guessing Skeleton was Short, Shaffer tells TheWrap Short, his best friend, was bugging him to find out if Shaffer was the Skeleton.

“All I can say is that Marty called me and he said, ‘Are you the Skeleton?’ And I said, ‘I thought you were the Skeleton.’ ‘Cause you gotta say something to people,” the Canadian musician said. “A lot of people started asking, are you the Skeleton? But of course I wasn’t going to tell anybody,
See full article at The Wrap »

'King of Camp and Confetti' comedy host Rip Taylor no more

Rip Taylor, one of Televisions most flamboyant personalities known as "The Crying Comedian" and "The King of Camp and Confetti" has passed away. He was 84.

Taylor died on Sunday in Beverly Hills, publicist Harlan Boll confirmed, reports variety.com.

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Taylor, whose high-energy personality and confetti-throwing antics quickly made him a mainstay on Television, made appearances on everything from sitcoms to talk shows, including "The Gong Show", "Password", "The Merv Griffin Show", "The Mike Douglas Show", "The Tonight Show", and "Late Night with David Letterman" in addition to a hosting stint for "The $1.98 Beauty Show" -- a parody of beauty contests whose big prize was a bouquet of rotten vegetables.

He saw even more success outside of game shows and late-night TV, headlining Las Vegas' The Flamingo Hotel's Rockettes Extravaganza -- where he won Entertainer of the Year three consecutive times --
See full article at GlamSham »

Rip Taylor, ‘King of Camp and Confetti’ Comedy Host, Dies at 84

  • Variety
Rip Taylor, ‘King of Camp and Confetti’ Comedy Host, Dies at 84
Rip Taylor, one of Television’s most flamboyant personalities known as “The Crying Comedian” and “The King of Camp and Confetti,” died Sunday in Beverly Hills, publicist Harlan Boll confirmed. He was 84.

Taylor, whose high-energy personality and confetti-throwing antics quickly made him a mainstay on television, made appearances on everything from sitcoms to talk shows, including “The Gong Show,” “Password,” “The Merv Griffin Show,” “The Mike Douglas Show,” “The Tonight Show,” “Late Night with David Letterman” in addition to a hosting stint for “The $1.98 Beauty Show” — a parody of beauty contests whose big prize was a bouquet of rotten vegetables.

Taylor saw even more success outside of game shows and late-night TV, headlining Las Vegas’ The Flamingo Hotel’s Rockettes Extravaganza — where he won Entertainer of the Year three consecutive times — and touring the country in lead roles for productions such as “Sugar Babies,” “Anything Goes, Oliver,” “Peter Pan” and
See full article at Variety »

Comedy Central Inks First-Look Animation Deal With Donick Cary

  • Variety
Comedy Central has signed a first-look animation producing deal with Donick Cary, best known for his work as a former head writer for “The Late Show with David Letterman” and co-executive producer of “The Simpsons” and other shows.

Under the terms of his deal, Cary will develop and produce animation projects across all platforms for the network and its new studio-production arm, Comedy Central Productions. He will also develop his own ideas, and work with other talent and creators to identify and develop animated programming for Comedy Central as well as other platforms.

“I couldn’t be more thrilled and can’t think of a better place to be developing funny cartoons for than Cc,” said Cary. “Comedy Central always encourages the right mix of funny, smart and super stupid! I definitely check at least one of those boxes! Looking forward to rolling up my sleeves and figuring out how
See full article at Variety »

Watch Michael Keaton Drop a Big Batman Spoiler in This Old Interview with David Letterman

This past weekend marked the 30th anniversary of the release of the 1989 Tim Burton film Batman. A little known fact is that the star of the film, Michael Keaton, actually went on Late Night With David Letterman the night before its release, and totally spoiled the movie! This was before DVRs and YouTube and every little thing on TV and the internet being blasted onto cellphones and computers, so the only people who heard it were the people who happened to be watching that episode that night.

I’m sure those people weren’t impressed with the spoiler, but like Letterman says in the video, “Yeah, like nobody’s gonna go see it now!” Good point, but he would have gotten in so much more trouble now! Watch the video below, and if you haven’t seen the 1989 Batman, spoiler alert!
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Watch Michael Keaton Spoil Tim Burton's Batman on TV Night Before Premiere

  • MovieWeb
Watch Michael Keaton Spoil Tim Burton's Batman on TV Night Before Premiere
Tim Burton's Batman was a big deal when it hit theaters in the summer of 1989. It's still a big deal to this day, having set the wheels in motion for what a comic book adaptation could be on the big screen. With that being said, star Michael Keaton accidentally spoiled the big Joker twist while out promoting the movie on the night before its premiere. This is a common occurrence these days with Tom Holland and Mark Ruffalo's names instantly coming to mind.

At the time of its release in 1989, many were expecting Batman to have the same corny look and feel as the 60s TV series, which starred Adam West. Instead, comic book fans were given a darker look at the character and his origins, along with the struggle to keep it all together, anchored by a strong performance from Michael Keaton. While appearing on Late Night with David Letterman,
See full article at MovieWeb »

'Awards Chatter' Podcast — David Letterman ('My Next Guest Needs No Introduction')

'Awards Chatter' Podcast — David Letterman ('My Next Guest Needs No Introduction')
"It's like you're thrown out of a speeding truck," David Letterman, the stand-up and late-night comedy legend, says as we sit down at the Bedford Post Inn in Bedford, New York, about an hour outside of Manhattan, to record an episode of The Hollywood Reporter's Awards Chatter podcast, and I ask him what it was like to wake up on May 21, 2015, and, for the first time in 33 years, not have to stress about hosting a talk show. Letterman, of course, hosted Late Night With David Letterman on NBC from 1982 through 1993 and The Late ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Film News: Patrick McDonald Hosts ‘Bathtubs Over Broadway' for Ahfs on May 13, 2019

Chicago – How does one man rediscover and revive an art form? This question is answered in the magnificent “Bathtubs Over Broadway,” a 2018 documentary about the quest of comedy writer Steve Young, as he saves the legacy of the “industrial musical,” a form of American corporate entertainment from the 1950s through the ‘70s. Patrick McDonald of HollywoodChicago.com will host a screening of the film on Monday, May 13th, 2019 (7:30pm), and facilitate a discussion afterward, at the Tivoli Theatre in Downers Grove, Ill. To purchase tickets, click here.

To experience “Bathtubs…” is to witness a miracle. What began as a minor comedy bit on “Late Night with David Letterman,” where Steve Young was a writer, morphed into a bit of an obsession for the low-keyed jokester. His delving into the industrial musical began with the souvenir records from these shows, done in very limited runs. Young then discovered that corporations like Alcoa,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Flashback: Rodney Crowell Sings ‘She’s Crazy for Leavin” Inside an Airport

On April 8th, 1988, Columbia Records released Rodney Crowell’s breakthrough album, Diamonds & Dirt. Having released his debut LP Ain’t Living Long Like This a full decade earlier for Warner Bros., the former guitarist in Emmylou Harris’ Hot Band had, in his estimation, finally made a record his father would enjoy. While his earlier efforts veered into rock & roll territory, Diamonds & Dirt was a sharp, focused — but never pandering — stab at widespread commercial acceptance. How widespread was that acceptance? Five consecutive Number One singles. . . a full 50% of the original album’s 10 cuts.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

David Horowitz Dies: Emmy-Winning ‘Fight Back!’ Host Who Was Held Hostage On Live TV Was 81

  • Deadline
David Horowitz Dies: Emmy-Winning ‘Fight Back!’ Host Who Was Held Hostage On Live TV Was 81
David Horowitz, the News Emmy-winning reporter and longtime consumer advocate who was involved in one of the most infamous live-tv events in Los Angeles history, has died. He was 81. A family spokesman said the Fight Back! host died Thursday in Los Angeles of dementia-related complications.

Horowitz was a reporter for NBC during the Vietnam War and opened the network’s first Saigon bureau. He later was the only newsman to be live on the air in the immediate aftermath of the 1971 Sylmar earthquake. A fixture on Knbc-tv newscasts for nearly 20 years, he moved to rival Kcbs in 1993. It was during his stint on the NBC affiliate that a disturbed man pulled a “gun” on Horowitz during a live segment.

With the weapon — which later was revealed to be a Bb pistol but looked very real — held at his back, Horowitz was forced to read a rambling manifesto. Horowitz began to engage the man,
See full article at Deadline »

Film Review: ‘Bathtubs Over Broadway’ Revives a Forgotten Art Form

Chicago – There are cultural heroes, and then there is comedy writer Steve Young. Through sheer happenstance, he began a journey that ended up with a rediscovery of an art form that without Young’s intervention would have died. The U.S. corporation Broadway-style “industrial musical,” which highlighted products or sales meetings in a song and dance presentation, were at its peak popularity from the 1950s through the ‘70s. “Bathtubs Over Broadway” is Young’s documentary of appreciation for those shows and and his intervention to revive them.

Rating: 4.5/5.0

To experience “Bathtubs…” is to witness a miracle. What began as a minor comedy bit on “Late Night with David Letterman,” where Steve Young was a writer, morphed into a bit of an obsession for the low-keyed jokester. His delving into the corporate show culture began with the souvenir records from these shows, done in very limited runs. After seeing the names associated with these shows…
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Veteran Comedian Bob Einstein of Curb Your Enthusiasm Dies at 76

Tony Sokol Jan 2, 2019

Bob Einstein, Curb Your Enthusiam's Marty Funkhouser and Albert Brooks' older brother, was part of TV comedy history.

Comedy veteran Bob Einstein, who wrote for the controversial The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour but is best known for his turn as Marty Funkhouser on Curb Your Enthusiasm, died at age 76 following a recent cancer diagnosis, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Einstein’s death was confirmed his younger brother, Albert Brooks. “R.I.P. My dear brother Bob Einstein. A great brother, father and husband. A brilliantly funny man. You will be missed forever,” posted on Twitter.

"Very sad," Curb Your Enthusiasm writer David Mandel tweeted. "Got to work with him on #Curb. Had heard he was sick. Will never forget him telling @jerryseinfeld the dirty joke about the newlyweds." Costar, actor and comedian Richard Lewis also eulogized on social media.

Since making his debut in season 4, Einstein
See full article at Den of Geek »

Bob Einstein, ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm,’ ‘Super Dave’ Actor, Dead at 76

Bob Einstein, ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm,’ ‘Super Dave’ Actor, Dead at 76
Bob Einstein, the gravelly-voiced actor best known for playing Curb Your Enthusiasm’s Marty Funkhouser and the spirited stuntman Super Dave Osborne, died Wednesday at the age of 76. New York Daily News reports that he had been battling cancer.

Although best known as an actor, Einstein, the older brother of Albert Brooks, got his start in the entertainment industry as a writer. He won two Emmys in the 1970s for his contributions to the Dick Van Dyke vehicle, Van Dyke and Company, and The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour. In addition
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Bob Einstein, Super Dave Osborne Actor, Dies at 76

  • The Wrap
Bob Einstein, Super Dave Osborne Actor, Dies at 76
Bob Einstein, the actor best known for his Super Dave Osborne character, has died at the age of 76, TheWrap has learned.

Einstein’s brother, actor and comedian Albert Brooks, also confirmed the news of Einstein’s passing on Twitter on Wednesday. “R.I.P. My dear brother Bob Einstein. A great brother, father and husband. A brilliantly funny man. You will be missed forever,” Brooks wrote.

An L.A.-born actor, writer and comedian, Einstein made first made his name as a writer for “The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour” alongside the likes of Steve Martin and Murray Roman before transitioning to performing as the bungling Super Dave Osborne character in the 1970s.

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Einstein first debuted the character, a sunny, naive and frequently-injured parody of daredevil stuntmen like Evel Knievel, on John Byner’s variety show in 1972 and later recurred on
See full article at The Wrap »

Bob Einstein Dies: ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ Actor Who Created Super Dave Osborne Character Was 76

  • Deadline
Bob Einstein Dies: ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ Actor Who Created Super Dave Osborne Character Was 76
Bob Einstein, a two-time Emmy winner who has recurred on HBO’s Curb Your Enthusiasm since its launch and created the wacky Super Dave Osborne character, died today in Indian Wells, CA. He was 76 and recently had been diagnosed with cancer.

Best known to today’s viewers for playing the serious, often surly but always hilarious Marty Funkhouser on Curb, Einstein was a foil for its creator-star Larry David. He appeared in nearly two dozen episodes of the series dating from 2004 to the most recent season.

Einstein’s younger brother, actor-director Albert Brooks, tweeted today, “R.I.P. My dear brother Bob Einstein. A great brother, father and husband. A brilliantly funny man. You will be missed forever.”

A comedian’s comedian, Einstein first made his name as a writer. His career dates to the 1960s, when he won his first Emmy as part of the writing team for The
See full article at Deadline »

See Cardi B, Michael Buble Ring in Holidays With ‘Carpool Karaoke’

See Cardi B, Michael Buble Ring in Holidays With ‘Carpool Karaoke’
James Corden recruited a who’s who of pop music to ring in the holiday season on a special edition of his recurring Late Late Show segment, “Carpool Karaoke.” “It’s not even cold outside,” Cardi B tells the festively dressed host as the bells kick in for a rendition of “Christmas (Baby Please Come Home).”Joining him along the way are Paul McCartney, Christina Aguilera, Ariana Grande, Adam Levine, Shawn Mendes, Michael Buble and Barbra Streisand.

“Happy Chanukah, happy holidays, happy kwanza,” Streisand says midway through. Aguilera and Grande soulfully sing melismas,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Christmas on TV: Top 20 greatest episodes of all time, ranked worst to best, include ‘Happy Days,’ ‘SNL,’ ‘The Brady Bunch,’ ‘Seinfeld’

It’s a Christmas tradition for almost every great television series to end the calendar year with a Christmas episode. When done right, this segment can become a classic that brings joy to the holiday season. Whether they are completely original or variations on themes involving Santa Claus, “It’s a Wonderful Life,” Ebenezer Scrooge or some other staple, fans of these shows can hold such episodes in their hearts forever. Our photo gallery looks back on the 20 greatest Christmas episodes, ranked best to worst, from such shows as “Happy Days,” “The Brady Bunch,” “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” “Seinfeld,” “Saturday Night Live,” “The Office,” “Late Night with David Letterman” and more.

SEE15 Greatest Christmas Movies of All Time

20. Little House on the Prairie – “Christmas at Plum Creek” (1974)

Christmas is all about secrets. Laura (Melissa Gilbert) wants to buy an expensive present for her mother. Mary (Melissa Sue Anderson) wants
See full article at Gold Derby »

Top 20 Greatest Christmas TV Episodes, Ranked Worst to Best

It’s a Christmas tradition for almost every great television series to end the calendar year with a Christmas episode. When done right, this segment can become a classic that brings joy to the holiday season. Whether they are completely original or variations on themes involving Santa Claus, “It’s a Wonderful Life,” Ebenezer Scrooge or some other staple, fans of these shows can hold such episodes in their hearts forever. Our photo gallery looks back on the 20 greatest Christmas episodes from such shows as “Happy Days,” “The Brady Bunch,” “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” “Seinfeld,” “Saturday Night Live,” “The Office,” “Late Night with David Letterman” and more.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Film Review: ‘Bathtubs Over Broadway’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘Bathtubs Over Broadway’
Anyone who loves musical theater owes it to themselves to see “Bathtubs Over Broadway,” a delightful deep-dive documentary into one man’s obsession with the obscure world of industrial musicals — corporate-sponsored song-and-dance revues from the golden age of American capitalism. Think of it as “big-brand music,” commissioned for company retreats where they would be performed just once and then forgotten. Well, almost forgotten, since a handful of collectors have developed a kind of ironic affection for these loony tunes, which makes for an outrageous but never-less-than-reverent tour down the back alleys of Broadway.

Turns out a clever cleffer (vintage Variety slanguage for a professional songwriter) can fashion a witty ditty about pretty much anything, from the profitability of Purina Dog Chow to the joys of Surg-o-Pak sterile hospital sheets. Don’t believe me? Witness “It’ll Change Your Life,” one of two original musical numbers Steve Young — a comedy writer
See full article at Variety »

‘Bathtubs Over Broadway’ Film Review: Ebullient Doc Sheds Light on Musicals Aimed at Corporate America

  • The Wrap
‘Bathtubs Over Broadway’ Film Review: Ebullient Doc Sheds Light on Musicals Aimed at Corporate America
If Dava Whisenant’s joyous documentary “Bathtubs Over Broadway” served only to spotlight the occluded corner of American musical history known as the “industrial musical,” it would be perfectly entertaining in its own right. But in its portrayal of one man’s unusual journey, the film has much to say about turning ironic amusement into unalloyed appreciation.

And if you don’t know what an “industrial musical” is, relax — we were never meant to see them in the first place. Starting in the 1950s, these shows were crafted to entertain and inspire the sales reps from companies like Xerox and General Electric. Expensive and elaborate, they were often performed only a few times, at conventions or sales meetings, and they mostly exist now on souvenir soundtrack recordings (of shows with names like “Diesel Dazzle” or “The Bathrooms Are Coming!”) that weren’t intended to be shared with the general public.
See full article at The Wrap »
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