Silver Dream Racer (1980) Poster

User Reviews

Review this title
28 Reviews
Sort by:
Filter by Rating:
6/10
I've been scarred for life.
Curtis G.27 June 2003
Warning: Spoilers
Sometime in the early 80s, I borrowed a copy of this movie, which had been taped from a cable movie channel in the US, and while there was a fair amount of cheese (and too much rear projection), I quite enjoyed it. Sure, it's the same old formula--underdog comes from nowhere to beat the world champion--but the Silver Dream Machine--whatta bike!--made it something special. I mean, Essex whacks the throttle on the last lap, the music swells as he overtakes the champ and crosses the finish line in victory...what could be better? That's how this kind of movie is *supposed* to end.

And up until last night, that's how I thought it ended. Except suddenly, there was more movie where there shouldn't have been...

**EXTREME SPOILER** ...Raines screams, the front wheel wobbles, and Essex goes into the pit wall, crashes and EXPLODES!? Where did this come from? This is not the movie I used to watch! Maybe I saw a sanitized-for-your-enjoyment-on-an-airplane (or cable TV) ending originally, but I have to admit to being very disturbed by the extremely down original ending. It wasn't even bittersweet--it was downright cruel. Now, if Essex had some terminal illness, crossed the finish line and then died in his girlfriend's arms, that's perfectly fair. But to have him crash and burn--literally--at the end? What kind of sick person would write that? (Never mind that most racers walk away from worse get-offs--and do so earlier in the film--and bikes only explode in movies.) Especially surreal and disturbing was watching the other racers riding by, sort of off-handedly glancing at the smoldering wreckage as the movie faded to black. For me, that's easily the most depressing 90 seconds of film ever shot. Are the British pathologically immune to happiness or something?

If you actually watch it, do yourself a favor and hit "STOP" as soon as you see Dad smiling as Essex raises his arms in victory. Otherwise you'll be scarred for life.
16 out of 19 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
Awesome
ianrthompson4 August 2005
I can't believe that they don't make films like this anymore!!!!! This film is excellent. It has great characters i.e. Cider and fantastic acting from the seminal David Essex. The theme tune and opening sequence is the best ever and just makes you want to ride motorbikes. The training montage is far better then anything in Rocky and I have been eating Alpen ever since. And the ending is fabulous from the moment Barry Sheene pops a wheelie to the dramatic climax. That Bridges bloke is excellent as the villain and David Essex has some fantastic lines such as "Can I have my bike back". Look for the superb Nick Brimble in a cameo as a tall hard man, a role that he has made his own. My mate likes this film so much, he now races motorbikes. And another mate, well his mum loves the early scene of the dudes on scramblers. If you like motorbikes, you'll love this film. Oh yeah, don't watch the "new" ending on DVD as it is pump.
10 out of 15 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
Loved it then, still love it now!
sarah-59411 August 2005
I used to love watching this years ago with my dad and this film got me into bikes too!!! When it was released on DVD i was so chuffed, but unfortunately it had a different ending, gutted! But i finally got a copy on laser-disc with the "unhappy" ending and i love it just as much now as i did then, i don't care if i'm in the minority. This film as lasted the test of time in my books and its great! Surprisingly enough the bike still looked good too after all these years, loved the sound track too! To be honest i wasn't much of a David Essex fan until i watched this film, but now have great respect for him and his work (acting and singing) and no before everyone thinks it I'm not an 85 year old lady who loves him, for the record i'm 23. So all in all a great film for all ages, as long as you watch the crash ending anyway!!! Love the film, love the bike and love the soundtrack!!!

Sarah
8 out of 13 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
5/10
Green lights are go!
lost-in-limbo24 April 2007
Nick Freeman is a down-on-his luck but hearty motorbike rider, but after the death of his brother. He inherits a slick looking and innovative prototype, which his brother originally designed. He also finds himself in a little personal battle with champion rider Bruce McBride, and strikes up a relationship with Julie who tags along with McBride. Nick tries his best to find someone to finance his motorcycle with the help of Julie. After continuous knock backs, he's finally given the opportunity to show good this bike is, in the Silverstone World Championship.

Wow, what a hunk of unadulterated… cheese! Still I kind of like it, despite it hackneyed set-up, overwhelming sense of forced sentiment and b-grade feel even with a modest budget. The prototype (designed by Barry Hart) looks pretty sweet, although the film never really lets the motorcycle smoke it up for too long. The racing scenes are professionally handled with a certain edginess. Creatively crisp cinematography and large-scale aerial shots do a good job of bringing the action to the screen. However some questionable blue screen moments show up (and also outside of the race), but never too distracting. Singer David Essex surprisingly churns out quite a decently genuine and fitting performance in the lead, were his monotonously dry presence captured the reckless nature and sour humour of his character. He was also tagged to the film's soundtrack, which was overwrought, but spiritedly engineered to pluck away. David Wickes' economical direction has its mild flashes of glossy precision. The melodrama plot (taken off Michael Billington's original source) is the same-old story with clichés-galore and plastic situations. What we get is a token romance sub-plot and "against the odds" tale, where the desire to succeed and the developments to get where the protagonist reaches can somewhat drum out an happy feel-good sensation. Along the way there's time for some corny montages with mushy music to back it up, but these moments did slow up the pace. It does feel overlong, and the script is considerably spotty, but always diverting with witty remarks. Now the main talking point has go to be the dramatically downbeat ending. Where did that come from?! While it might feel odd to what has gone before it. I thought it was perfect, as it's just like a punch in the gut. The rest of the performances were good, and the crackling chemistry made sure of humorous interactions. Beau Bridges egotistical showman performance is a glowing one and a elegantly solid Christina Raines simply delights. Clarke Peters winningly fine performance, as Nicks' friend/co-worker always made sure there was something amusing whenever on screen. T.P McKenna also gets a minor part, as a bank manager/biker enthusiast.

I know, just how many times have we've seen this been done? Plenty, but I got to hand to Wickes, as he had me sucked in and that haunting conclusion was a real ice-breaker.
2 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
8/10
USA version is good, British version stinks!
g-man_86312 September 2010
I first saw the US release version of Silver Dream Racer on HBO in the early '80s. It wasn't until almost 20 years later I saw the original UK version (same film with different editing). As a fan of MotoGP racing, my emotions on this movie are mixed.

Assuming you've never seen the movie or been been exposed to spoilers on the editing differences in the original (UK) versus US release versions, pay attention: THE EDITING DIFFERENCES IN WHICH VERSION YOU WATCH WILL LIKELY HAVE A MAJOR IMPACT ON IF YOU LIKE OR DISLIKE THIS FILM. When the DVD is re-released in late 2010, it will hopefully give you the option to choose the US edit as the default view.

THE VOTE OF "8" IS FOR THE US RELEASE VERSION. The editing and scene differences make it a much more enjoyable movie. Without injecting a spoiler, the editing differences drop the original UK/European version to a rating of "2" (1, plus an extra point for a decent theme song by David Essex). Based on the US version, the acting is OK (David Essex and Beau Bridges do a better job in front of the camera than most real GP racers being interviewed). The camera shots are decent (remember this was filmed in 1980, long before Hi-Def helmet cams became the norm).

If you're a fan of racing and sport bikes, the US version is worth your time.
4 out of 6 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
4/10
Lost my faith in the Underdog
destrozar12 April 2004
Warning: Spoilers
OK, fine, I admit that the movie plot is a bit cheezy, though the Silver Dream Racer did fuel my aspirations of becoming a professional motorcycle racer (a dream I later abandoned because of my inability to even be able to ride a rudimentary bicycle). I saw this movie in the early 90's when I was still a wee lad, and believe me it made me lose faith in the Underdog forever! OK, so here's Nick, a young rider on a hot bike who kicks much butt at Silverstone, destroying everything from Germans to Australians to Americans and even surviving the dreaded American tag team death trap! A man that rides perfectly to the very end when he crosses the finish line and makes the only life-shattering mistake of removing his hands from the handlebar to signify his victory and suddenly has his bike wobble, crash into a wall, and then explode in a spectacular pyrotechnic display. Where is the justice?
4 out of 6 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
5/10
Real life imitates art, but only to a point!
labratV21 November 2004
O.K., I'll concede that this movie is not all that great! I don't think there's been a really great motorcycle related film since Easy Rider. Although, Little Fauss and Big Halsey with Redford was not too shabby! A good character study as well as a bike flick. At least these films had something to do with the real racing spirit, unlike the miscreant unproductive behaviors glorified in the recent Larry Fishburn's "Biker Boyz". I can't think of any more insane premise than racing Nitro-enhanced Huyabusa type bikes down a dead-end dirt road as a grand finale... I think trying to travel light speed is a more feasible idea? There's something about that scene stolen from a horse/western flick, but doesn't work! This film did nothing but serve to further demonize the average Joe commuter/enthusiast cyclist for law enforcement types by glamorizing a subculture of reckless uninsurable freaks that exist in the big U.S. cities.

  • For those that don't like the SDR ending, don't you get it? Underdog type gets the hot chick, takes the race with utter impunity only to meet demise at the end. It's a classic tragedy! Also tragic was the British motorcycle industry (British industry in general during this period) Metaphor?


I think besides the Norton rotary made for the Brit Police, the U.K. was soon to produce <200 units per annum until the 1995 resurrection of Triumph. I think the Jeff Bridges character in SDR was supposed to be a metaphor for the then- dominant American Kenny Roberts, but I'm sure the great KR wouldn't appreciate that particular character portrayal! If upon watching SDR you find yourself irretrievably bummed out, watch Little Fauss, it will make you feel much better!

However, the Silver Dream concept was not completely fictitious. The Barton "Silver Dream Racers" were actually being built in an abandoned church in the U.K. at this time, They were a good design on paper, but very poorly executed when it came to tolerances and metalurgy. Some units would have their engines frag all over the shop after a couple throttle-twists. As the real story progresses, a Yank. Eric Buell got the design rights & built his own Wisconsin version that worked in 1983 (Buell RW-750 "Road Warrior"). However, the controlling regulatory entity in the U.S. eliminated this racing class that season... Politics even infiltrate the cycle racing world.... After this setback, Buell went back to engineering at Harley for a while. He would rise from the ashes to build an actual super-bike using a Harley engine with his own company. So far, the latest versions are very impressive, if not for all out speed, but a combination of charisma, durability, and finesse that nothing else has . I used to ride exclusively Japanese bikes myself, but have recently been converted... What would make things come full circle is some revived new tech at Harley to produce something that will eat Ducks (Ducatis) and RC51's, Maybe win the AMA super-bike title!!! It could happen? For now, there's the new Triumph Daytona 675. A full frontal assault on the same old Godzilla bike that's been coming from Hamamatsu for innumerable years. That's partially the essence of what this movie is really about. Vindication is at hand!:)

Well, that's where this sad little movie actually does fit into a bigger picture...
3 out of 5 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
5/10
Despite the subject, quite underwhelming
grantss7 September 2019
Nick Freeman is a talented motorcycle racer but his bike has seen better days and he doesn't have the finances to upgrade it. Then his brother dies and Nick is left the bike he spent the last three years developing. The bike is revolutionary and Nick sees a way to pursue his dream.

Heaps of potential, largely wasted. It is difficult to make an unexciting racing movie, but writer-director David Wickes somehow manages it here. The final racing scenes are great, but just about everything else is mediocre: sub-plots that don't go anywhere, much filler, attempts at humour that are largely silly, implausible plot developments or events and a general cheesiness to proceedings.

Throw in some irritating performances - David Essex and Cristina Raines are okay but Beau Bridges and Clarke Peters are quite cringeworthy - and the film is more miss than hit. Don't get me started on the ridiculous ending...
1 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
6/10
'Rocky' on two wheels? -sort of....
Brucey_D22 September 2018
When this film first came out I was keen on motorbikes, keen on movies and I was keen on pop music. But....David Essex made music that was poles apart from the stuff I liked, the movie was pretty cheesy and the 'Silver Dream Racer' itself was -to anyone who knew anything about motorcycles- in many respects a fairly obvious fraud. So I wasn't overly impressed, back then.

However, wind the clock on 38 years and by some miracle I can at least tolerate Essex's music, the motorcycling scenes are interesting to me for all kinds of reasons, and when it comes down to it this is a film that is better made than many are, with a plot that is no less cheesy or nonsensical than most.

The motorcycle itself was designed and built by a UK company and used an engine that was mostly used as a sidecar power unit. Three machines were planned, of which two were finished and used in the film. Of the three, only the third machine -which was barely a chassis and bodywork when the movie was made- now exists, apparently, and has been recently restored and used in a photo shoot this year (2018). A further mockup (with an entirely different chassis beneath) was destroyed during filming. The bike is meant to be 'revolutionary' with 240bhp and have a 'carbon fibre chassis' but in the film it is clearly none of these things, although it was a real racing motorcycle of a kind rather than just a prop. About 150bhp was typical at the time for top class GP bikes.

Like many racing films real race footage is used in the film. However unlike most racing films they didn't just dress up an extant racing machine and use that, they actually tried to race the bike that had been built for the film for real. Roger Marshall actually rode the bike in a 1979 Silverstone race and much of the race footage in the film comes from that event. However in reality the performance of the machine was so far from being competitive that in order to qualify the machine they allegedly (and quite illegally) replaced the 500cc motor with a 750cc version instead.

Brands Hatch, Donington Park, Silverstone and an unknown disused airfield were used for filming. In fairness David Essex was a genuine motorcycle nut and rode bikes in several of the scenes in the movie, perhaps taking more risks than most movie stars might have.

So overall this isn't the most brilliant movie in the world but it will (of course) appeal to David Essex fans, it is an interesting period piece and it is somewhat better (especially if you have an interest in motorcycle racing around that period) than some of the negative reviews here might suggest.

If you have read other reviews here you may have gathered that there are two different edits of this film in circulation; if you have the DVD you can choose the version you want but if you watch it on UK TV (eg 'talking pictures') they generally use one version not the other.
1 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
4/10
Fails to make motorbike racing exciting
Leofwine_draca12 April 2017
Warning: Spoilers
SILVER DREAM RACER is a star vehicle for pop singer David Essex, who had made a couple of films in the 1970s. Sadly, it seems his star was fading by this stage and the resultant film is a dreary concoction that fails to make motorbike racing in any way exciting. The nadir of the movie is a cheesy training montage, seemingly inspired by ROCKY, which shows Essex eating muesli and running in slow motion, accompanied by cheesy music.

As expected there are a few songs featured here although they're not well known and not particularly memorable. The film is a bit of a slog to sit through and takes itself way too seriously. The main draw is seeing the familiar faces in support, with American import Beau Bridges taking centre stage as a rival racer. Essex is outclassed by the likes of Harry H. Corbett, looking aged in his final role, and Clarke Peters (OUTLAND) as his loudmouthed friend. Nick Brimble, aka Little John, is a garage mechanic and both T.P. McKenna and Elizabeth Sladen show up for a bank scene. The exciting climax is the best part.
1 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
Silver Dream Classic
Larkrise21 January 2007
Warning: Spoilers
I remember seeing this movie year's ago one night and loved it, i cried at the end could not believe he died and what a way to go. I've got it now on DVD with the original and alternative endings still the originals better after all you can only have so much of a good thing. I'm not a motorbike enthusiast but i can see why people can be influenced it almost makes you want to go out and ride motorbikes,David Essexs is brilliant as Freeman and Beau Bridges is good as the Villain but its the bike that steals the movie.The theme tune is very catchy and suits the movies opening sequence. I can't say enough about this movie sad as i maybe i love it.
2 out of 4 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
8/10
This is still good even now
paulantfry16 October 2005
This film is purely a bike enthusiasts film which it lives up to dated now but i was in silver stone when some footage was shot which adds some memories for me,it was the Marlboro transatlantic trophy if i remember rightly around 1978 i was up in the stand then which then looked like something still under construction ,when a voice came over the Tanny to announce when the silver bike comes around everybody to wave and cheer this was for film footage i was to find out later n the day.It is a special film to me even today i still watch it and still i get hairs on back of my neck standing up .As i say this film i think is for bike enthusiasts who i feel without doubt they will enjoy and want to watch again like me .
2 out of 4 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
British motorbike racer takes on the world on a prototype GP machine
exup3526 December 2005
Warning: Spoilers
This film came out when I was very young and looking back in hindsight was probably one of the influences that made me learn to ride motorbikes,and have them as an important part of my life (check out the user name).

I'm not sure if the rivalry between Barry Sheene and Kenny Roberts had anything to do with the film but David Essex character reminds me of Bazza especially with the training at Brands Hatch.

When I watched it again with my girlfriend (1st time she saw it) in the 90's it was still a blast and my GF enjoyed it too. Although I still can remember a lot of people grumbled at the ending.. Thats something you'll have to make your mind up over. I still wonder about it when the film is mentioned or I hear the theme song on radio.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
top
shaun-lowthian15 October 2005
Essex is the most underrated actor we ever produced.The bike was gorgeous,Harry H Corbett and a tale of a British success !Who could ask for more ?If you are a bike fan,as i am,the plot came almost second to that great bike.You cannot the makers to portray an entire season in such a short time,so the single GP format was really the only way to do it.Whats wrong with a sentimental film? On golden pond,Love story,Kramer vs Kramer Love story all seemed to do quite well as I remember.If you Take Essexs acting in That'll Be the day and Stardust,you cannot say that he isn't a master of the craft.I will warrant you,that because of the obvious lack of knowledge on the subject,the directing was not first class,but no movie has everything.Praise where its due,beautiful bike,fair bit of racing footage and Davids love of bikes really came through.Top film,greatly underrated.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
Not as great as I remember but OK considering.
amuldoon2 March 2005
When you think this is over 25 years old it ain't so bad. Sometimes the acting leaves a lot to be desired and some of the locations have you wondering if its U.S. or U.K. but the grand finale is still worth the wait.

I didn't realise there was an alternate ending and I'm disappointed the DVD I bought from Play didn't have both endings not just the one made for the US market.

I won't spoil it too much but I don't think it's really an alternate ending just 5 seconds shorter.

If you're around my age the theme song at the end of the movie will bring back memories and probably get you singing along.
2 out of 5 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
It may be a corny, weak movie but ...
ThePM22 September 1999
I saw this or part of it last night (21-09-99) and the only reason I was interested in it was when I saw {Cristina Raines .... Julie Prince} - she is certainly an extremely beautiful woman and as far as I am concerned makes this film well worth watching.

Forget the cheesy scences on the bike or Essex jogging with his perma-grin - just focus on the lovely Cristina and you'll easily get through it!
2 out of 5 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Astonishingly dull
JohnSeal30 January 2003
There are very few films so boring so I can be driven from the room before the half way point. This is one of those films. A past his sell-by date David Essex plays a competitive motorcyclist taking on the champion, personified with stoic dullness by Beau Bridges. Harry H. 'I'm not the one with Sooty' Corbett is wasted in a small role and the rest of the cast seem to be American or are British actors pretending to be American. The opening credits of the print on Encore Action were letterboxed, and they do showcase the usual fine work by cinematographer Paul Beeson. Unfortunately the rest of the print was pan and scanned disastrously. The story by David Wickes--who also directed--is an utter failure. Even Essex fans will be let down, as his score is mostly drecky instrumental stuff. So bad, it's bad!!
3 out of 10 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Awful, Awful, Awful
Tin Tin-323 March 1999
Where to begin? Appalling plot, appalling acting, appalling score. I can scarcely remember a film where I have squirmed so much in embarrassment. This tale of a world-conquering British "superbike" (coming at a time when the British motorcycle industry was all but dead in the water) is corny in the extreme. Truly some of the worst acting ever seen, but despite the huge amount of money spent on the movie, I have never met anyone who has seen it. There is a God.
3 out of 10 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
U gotta b kidding!!!!
pastormike-449-4556314 August 2012
...I wasted 90 minutes of my life, watching this wretched film on THIS movie network...I was stuck at home with a blood clot, and my wife had set the remote too far away to reach.....I gagged, and wondered how Beau Bridges ever got involved with this movie....predictable plot...and one butt ugly bike. I raced amateur in WERA and AMA...no one...NO ONE rides world championships like Silverstone unless they are tried and true....but I do have to say my favorite part was the crash and burn at the end....I laughed and I am not a sadist!! I cried during the Lion King....but this...and the stupid ending...made me laugh...I did cry when I realized I would never get that part of my life again...
2 out of 6 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
I got a lot of love inside...
jnarimbaud9 August 2005
Tell me for god-sake why people slate this movie?

I'm no Essexmania reject I'm not old enough, & I like Kurosawa & Truffaut movies mixed with a little German expressionism. However I am a racing fan, & herein lays the reason I like this movie, the ending. There's a well worn saying "You couldn't write stuff like that" but I've seen it happen for real on track. Hell, you can all see unimaginable feats on the race track every few weeks from Valentino Rossi in the Moto GP series (incidentally for those in the know, checkout David Essex' shaggy hair & earring, pretty similar to The Doctor!!)

Yeah you can tell it was made in 1980 but who cares, what's the preoccupation with always having a present day setting? The racing scenes minus the awful blue screen are sheer class, as are the crashes. Give it a chance, like McQueen's Le Mans it'll at least give you a few race thrills with the first viewing. It's not Citizen Kane, but it's not as unwatchable as people would like to make out.

It gets 9 just for the ending race sequence.
2 out of 6 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
What an ending!
Red-Barracuda8 March 2018
Warning: Spoilers
I remember this movie being on television many years ago, probably the late 80's or early 90's and sort of half-watching it. Only to be stunned by the mind-bogglingly nihilistic ending! Over the years the film stayed in my memory on account of this ending. I sort of always wondered if my memory was playing tricks on me or if I hadn't paying full attention at the time, so I was quite excited to see this flick play on a cable channel recently which would give me the opportunity to double-check what I had seen all those years before. The story is about a motorcycle racer whose brother is killed in a bike accident, he inherits the very bike - the silver dream racer of the title - and vows to become world champion with it. I watched this fairly rudimentary story unfold with a definite morbid anticipation and I kept watching the clock to see when this ending was due to kick in. Well, it finally did. And what can I say? If anything, it was even more downbeat and grim than I had remembered it! In slow motion, including horrified reactions of his friends, we watch the hero of the story cross the winning line on his bike and briefly enjoy his moment of fame before losing control of his bike and crash it into the wall at the side of the track, resulting in a fiery explosion; other racers pass on by and nonchalantly look at the fire. Cue end credits! Wow, what an ending! What an outstandingly brutal way to finish the movie and the fact that the rider is played by none other than the cosy pop singer David Essex only accentuates the unpredictable grimness even further. Some people have been scarred for life by the ending of this film and some consider it to be a disaster of an ending but I think it was frankly genius and so audacious. If it hadn't been for that, Silver Dream Racer would really be no more than a run-of-the-mill and forgettable sports-drama. Seemingly, there was a different happy ending made for the American market, which is not surprising but unfortunate. I say, stick to the depressing one we Brits were given, it gives you the important lesson that sometimes in life things just go disastrously wrong and bad stuff just happens. It's also got quite a cool theme tune, sung by David Essex naturally.
1 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
9/10
Excellent film
pixie_nubbins27 February 2006
Warning: Spoilers
OK my mum is a major David essex nut so as a child was really rail roaded in to this film- but years on I still love it and its what got me in to motorbikes. This is an all round good 80s' film and films are not made like this anymore. To todays standards it looks really budget but it will always hold a special place in my heart and I love the song that went with it as well!! If you have a lil sister like mine though who gets scared easily don't let her watch it- she wouldn't go on her push-bike for weeks just in case it went like the bike in the film (you try explaining to a tiny child that a push bike is nothing like a motorbike!).
1 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
a fan so happy enough
welwynrose15 July 2003
When I was younger I loved this film as I was a huge David Essex fan - but you have to be careful what version you watch as far as I know two endings were done - one for the states where he crosses the line a winner and the film has a happy ending - the other a United Kingdom version where he crosses the line a winner then skids, crashes burns and dies - not a brilliant film by any stretch of the imagination but it is over 20 years old now and it did appeal to his die-hard fans
1 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Rubbish
maxipetal-15 July 2002
Arguably the worst film I have ever seen. All prints of this film should be destroyed. I have been a keen motorcyclist all my life, and was rather looking forward to this film. Although it was released over 20 years ago, I didn't see it until just recently. I wish I hadn't bothered.
1 out of 6 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Rank Stupidity
malcolmgsw2 June 2017
In the late seventies the Rank Organisation decided to 're enter production.They made 8 films in which they invested 10 million pounds.They made a net loss of £1.3million pounds.Not surprisingly this was the last film they made till they restarted production in 1984.To anyone who is not a motor racing enthusiast this is a pain in the exhaust.It is is very hard to sit through this film.The film is very derivative.In fact I would say that parts of this film seem to have been taken from the George Form by film "No Limit".which I consider to be an entertaining film.The Rank Organisation did not know which way to go,in any event certainly not around a motor racing track.
0 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Awards | FAQ | User Ratings | External Reviews | Metacritic Reviews


Recently Viewed