7.0/10
3,912
40 user 45 critic

Thieves Like Us (1974)

When two men break out of prison, they join up with another and restart their criminal ways, robbing banks across the South.

Director:

Robert Altman

Writers:

Calder Willingham (screenplay), Joan Tewkesbury (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Keith Carradine ... Bowie
Shelley Duvall ... Keechie
John Schuck ... Chicamaw
Bert Remsen ... T-Dub
Louise Fletcher ... Mattie
Ann Latham ... Lula
Tom Skerritt ... Dee Mobley
Al Scott Al Scott ... Capt. Stammers
John Roper ... Jasbo
Mary Waits Mary Waits ... Noel Joy
Rodney Lee Rodney Lee ... James Mattingly (as Rodney Lee Jr.)
Arch Hall Sr. Arch Hall Sr. ... Alvin (as William Watters)
Joan Tewkesbury Joan Tewkesbury ... Lady in Train Station (as Joan Maguire)
Eleanor Matthews Eleanor Matthews ... Mrs. Stammers
Pam Warner Pam Warner ... Woman in Accident
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Storyline

Two convicts break out of Mississippi State Penitentiary in 1936 to join a third on a long spree of bank robbing, their special talent and claim to fame. The youngest of the three falls in love along the way with a girl met at their hideout, the older man is a happy professional criminal with a romance of his own, the third is a fast lover and hard drinker fond of his work. The young lovers begin to move out of the sphere in which they have met, a last robbery in Yazoo City goes badly and puts paid to the gang once and for all as a profitable venture, but isn't the end of the story quite yet, as all three are wanted and notorious men with altogether different points of view on the situation they are faced with. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Robbing 36 banks was easy. Watch what happens when they hit the 37th. See more »

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

3 June 1974 (Denmark) See more »

Also Known As:

Thieves Like Us See more »

Filming Locations:

Canton, Mississippi, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,125,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of two 1974 films released in that year that were directed by director Robert Altman. The other movie was California Split (1974). See more »

Goofs

In one of the old radio clips early in the film, the announcer talks about Seabiscuit winning the $25,000 Butler Handicap at Empire City Race Track. The actual date of Seabiscuit winning that race is July 10, 1937, which would place it after the end of the movie which concludes in the Spring of 1937. (Also, later in the film, we hear a radio broadcast of Franklin D. Roosevelt's second inaugural address, which occurred on January 20, 1937. Although the Seabiscuit race took place six months *after* Roosevelt's second inauguration, the film places the race broadcast *before* the inauguration speech.) See more »

Quotes

Bowie: I'll give you the straight of it, Keechie. I ain't sorry. I ain't sorry for anything I ever did in this world. Only regret I got is that I didn't get 100,000 instead of 19. And that I never pitched pro ball.
See more »

Connections

References MASH (1970) See more »

Soundtracks

Dream Awhile
(uncredited)
Written by Phil Ohman and Johnny Mercer
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Keith Carradine and Shelley Duvall as Lovers on the Lam
21 May 2007 | by evanston_dadSee all my reviews

"They Live by Night," the 1948 screen adaptation of the Edward Anderson novel "Thieves Like Us," and other films that have obviously been inspired by it, like "Gun Crazy" (1949) and "Bonnie and Clyde" (1967), have all been so good that it makes you wonder if yet another version of the same story is necessary. The answer is yes, because Robert Altman is behind this version, and if Altman proved nothing else as a director, he proved that he could take any material and make it his own.

Altman's "Thieves Like Us" is a beautiful and heartbreaking version of the lovers-on-the-lam story, with Keith Carradine cast as Bowie, the soft spoken, sensitive member of a trio of escaped convicts and bank robbers (the other two, Chickamaw and T-Dub, played by Altman regulars John Schuck and Bert Remsen, respectively). During a lull in their series of robberies, Bowie sets up house with Keechie (Shelley Duvall), a shy, simple country girl, and they take a stab at a sort of domestic bliss despite the fact that Bowie is doomed and it's only a matter of time before the law catches up to him. Meanwhile, T-Dub's sister-in-law, Mattie (Louise Fletcher), who has helped the fugitives because of family obligations, begins to tire of the example the trio are setting for her own children, and becomes an accomplice to the police trying to track down the criminals.

Previous screen versions of this story cast gorgeous actors as the lovers and made us fall in love with them. In 1948 it was Farley Granger and Cathy O'Donnell; in 1967 it was Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway. We fall in love with Carradine and Duvall too, but for different reasons. They are decidedly NOT gorgeous actors -- they're both skinny, ungainly and awkward. But they're both incredibly simple and sweet, and they have some lovely and naturalistic moments together that make us wish these two could just settle down, have a family and achieve their own small share of happiness. Altman constantly reminds us of the happiness these two are denied through use of an endless parade of print and radio advertisements that serves as a running commentary throughout the film. During a horrible depression during which so many people could afford nothing, Altman seems to be accusing the American consumerist culture of incessantly reminding everyone of what they didn't have. The way to happiness, Altman implies, seemed to lie in material comforts; no wonder the trio of men in this film prefer robbing banks to the alternatives available to them.

And there's another theme winding its way through Altman's version, one which appeared again and again in his work, that of frustrated male inadequacy. The men in this film turn to the most destructive behavior (thieving, drinking, sexual aggression) in order to cope with a world they feel they've lost control of, and this behavior is continuously juxtaposed to the feminine, domestic sphere represented by Mattie, eternally capable and resourceful, and resentful of the disruption the men bring along with them.

"Thieves Like Us" does not have that beautiful, ethereal sheen to it that characterized Altman's other early-1970s films, mostly because he did not use expert cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond on this outing. But thanks to the winsome performances of Carradine and Duvall, and the touching representation of their characters' tentative relationship, this is one of his warmest and emotionally resonant films from that time period.

Grade: A


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