Day for Night (1973) - News Poster

(1973)

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Day for Night

“Shooting a movie is like a stagecoach trip. At first you hope for a nice ride. Then you just hope to reach your destination.” Francois Truffaut’s warm, funny and knowing dramedy is one of the greatest movies about movies and the act of making them. The project in question, “Meet Pamela”, is obviously a potboiler, but the complex relations between cast and crew mirror every movie large or small. Another great George Delerue score is the cherry on top.

The post Day for Night appeared first on Trailers From Hell.
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Day for Night

“Shooting a movie is like a stagecoach trip. At first you hope for a nice ride. Then you just hope to reach your destination.” Francois Truffaut’s warm, funny and knowing dramedy is one of the greatest movies about movies and the act of making them. The project in question, “Meet Pamela”, is obviously a potboiler, but the complex relations between cast and crew mirror every movie large or small. Another great George Delerue score is the cherry on top.

The post Day for Night appeared first on Trailers From Hell.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Streaming: gently does it with Dominga Sotomayor

A mini Mubi retrospective offers a rare chance to see the work of one of South America’s most exciting young film-makers

You’ve probably noticed that bemoaning the lack of cinema release for certain outstanding films is a recurring theme in this column, so here’s a change of tune. One of the year’s loveliest arthouse releases did in fact get a big-screen UK airing back in the spring, courtesy of plucky indie distributor Day for Night. Still, if you didn’t see or hear of Chilean director Dominga Sotomayor’s richly evocative growing-up study Too Late to Die Young, that’s understandable. It was in a handful of cinemas, and, the market being what it is, didn’t stick around for long.

Thankfully, Mubi.com is offering its subscribers a second chance to catch up with the film, as well as with Sotomayor’s earlier work. Just
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Full Release Details for Scream Factory’s The Devil Rides Out Blu-ray

  • DailyDead
In addition to their recently announced The Omen Blu-ray collection, Scream Factory is bringing more fire and brimstone to Blu-ray with their new release of the Hammer horror film The Devil Rides Out (starring Christopher Lee), and before it hits shelves as a Halloween treat on October 29th, we've been provided with the full list of special features:

Press Release: All the demons of hell are summoned to Earth to claim “The Devil’s Bride”! Based on the celebrated novel by Dennis Wheatley, The Devil Rides Out is one of Hammer’s most accomplished and thrilling mystery horrors. On October 29, 2019, Scream Factory™ is proud to present Hammer horror cult classic The Devil Rides Out on Blu-ray. Directed by Terence Fisher (Frankenstein Created Woman), this 1968 shocker stars Christopher Lee, Charles Gray (Diamonds Are Forever), Nike Arrighi (Day for Night), Leon Green (Flash Gordon), Patrick Mower (Marco Polo), Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies (The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes
See full article at DailyDead »

Get Yourself Chained For Life

by Jason Adams

There is a fascinating film opening in New York today and in L.A. on Friday which I feel the need to give y'all some heads-up on if you're unawares -- Chained For Life stars Teeth (and It: Chapter 2!) actress Jess Weixler and Under the Skin actor Adam Pearson as a pair of actors who meet each other on the strange set of a surreal sorta horror film. She's the lovely leading lady, while he's the disfigured man in the shadows that's there to add that distinct touch of surreality that film-makers have been othering others with as long as there's been film.

From there in the grand tradition of movies-set-within-movies -- you could very much call this film Day For Night meets Freaks -- writer-director Aaron Schimberg dissolves the barriers between the two, tackling the heady subject of what we as an audience want to look at,
See full article at FilmExperience »

UK box office preview: ‘Horrible Histories’, ‘The Current War’ look to tap into audiences

UK box office preview: ‘Horrible Histories’, ‘The Current War’ look to tap into audiences
Horrible Histories distributor Altitude looks to tap into lucrative family market.

Two UK features will be vying to tap into specific corners of the market at the UK box office this weekend.

Horrible Histories: The Movie - Rotten Romans,based on the much-loved children’s book series, will be hoping to make a splash with family audiences.

The film is one of the first in-house productions from UK mini-studio Altitude and will also mark the company’s widest ever release, with the title set to enter more than 500 cinemas today (July 26).

It’s a big bet for Altitude, which is
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Valentina Cortese obituary

Italian actor remembered for her roles in Day for Night, The Wandering Jew and The House on Telegraph Hill

When Ingrid Bergman received her Oscar as best supporting actress for Murder on the Orient Express (1974), she concluded her acceptance speech by saying: “Please forgive me, Valentina. I didn’t mean to.” She was referring to the vibrant Italian actor Valentina Cortese, who was nominated alongside her for her role in François Truffaut’s La Nuit Américaine.

In that film, Cortese, who has died aged 96, played Severine, an ageing star who quaffs champagne while working, cannot find the right door to enter or exit, and blames her failure to remember her lines on the makeup girl. Cortese was already an established actor with the best part of her career behind her at the time of Truffaut’s inspirational casting. “A real character, extremely feminine and very funny,” he remarked of her at the time.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Valentina Cortese Dies: Italian Actress, Oscar-Nominated For François Truffaut’s ‘Day For Night’, Was 96

  • Deadline
Valentina Cortese Dies: Italian Actress, Oscar-Nominated For François Truffaut’s ‘Day For Night’, Was 96
Italian actress Valentina Cortese, Oscar-nominated for her performance in François Truffaut’s 1973 drama Day For Night, has died aged 96, according to Italian news service Ansa.

The prolific actress, whose career spanned more than 50 years, started out in Italian films of the early 1940s, leading to internationally acclaimed roles in Riccardo Freda’s 1948 Italian movie Les Misérables and the 1949 British film The Glass Mountain (1949), which led to a number of roles in American features.

Cortese starred in movies including second world war thriller Malaya with Spencer Tracy and James Stewart, Jules Dassin’s Thieves’ Highway with Richard Conte, and Joseph L Makiewicz’s The Barefoot Contessa with Humphrey Bogart and Ava Gardner.

In Europe she later starred in Michelangelo Antonioni’s Le Amiche, Terry Gilliam’s The Adventures Of Baron Munchausen and Franco Zeffirelli’s Brother Sun, Sister Moon.

In 1975, Cortese received a best supporting actress Oscar nomination for her role
See full article at Deadline »

Valentina Cortese, Italian Actress Nominated for Oscar, Dies at 96

  • Variety
Valentina Cortese, Italian Actress Nominated for Oscar, Dies at 96
Valentina Cortese, an Italian actress who held the extremely rare distinction of having been nominated for best supporting actress for her work in a foreign film, Francois Truffaut’s 1973 classic “Day for Night,” has died, according to Italian news agency Ansa. She was 96.

In Truffaut’s “Day for Night,” considered by many to be the best movie about making movies ever made, Cortese played, in the words of Roger Ebert, “the alcoholic diva past her prime.” The New York Times said: “The performances are superb. Miss Cortese and Miss Bisset are not only both hugely funny but also hugely affecting, in moments that creep up on you without warning.”

For a two-part, Carlo Ponti-produced 1948 film adaptation of “Les Miserables,” Cortese caused a sensation by playing both female leads, Fantine and Cosette. (The film was otherwise an adequate treatment of the Victor Hugo novel.)

“With Valentina Cortese’s passing, the
See full article at Variety »

Aperture: Asia & Pacific Film Festival unveils the Full Programme – London 4-13 June 2019 and Touring The UK, July-October 2019

Day for Night is delighted to announce the programme for the 2019 edition of its Aperture: Asia & Pacific Film Festival. Aperture will run in London from 4-13 June with a line-up of 13 features, both new titles and classics, including 6 UK Premieres and 1 London Premiere, as well as 17 shorts. Highlights for the festival include the UK premiere of critically acclaimed Kazakh director Adilkhan Yerzhanov’s “The Gentle Indifference of the World” (Opening Film), the London premiere of Aboozar Amini’s mesmeric debut feature-length documentary “Kabul, City in the Wind” and a screening of 2K restoration of Peter Weir’s classic drama “Picnic at Hanging Rock”.

Aperture seeks to bridge the gap within the UK festival landscape as the only UK film festival to cover the whole of the Asian region and also to explore Oceania and is presented by UK based independent film organisation Day for Night in partnership with the Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Thailand’s ‘Die Tomorrow’ Heads for China Release

  • Variety
“Die Tomorrow,” by Thai filmmaker Nawapol Thamrongrattanarit, is headed for a theatrical release in China. The film is a melancholy reflection on how people spend their last day on earth.

The release will be handled by Blue Media Times, a Beijing-based global program provider. Operating since 2008 it has previousy been involved with the release of Bong Joon-ho’s “The Host” and The Illusionist,” by Neil Burger.

Significantly the film stars Chutimon Chuengcharoensukying, the young actress who was the lead in hit drama “Bad Genius” and in 2017 was named by Variety and the International Film Festival & Awards Macao, as one of their Asian stars to watch. “Bad Genius” earned $41 million at the China box office in China in 2017.

“Die Tomorrow” is the fifth feature film of Thai Director Nawapol Thamrongrattanarit. He was previously director of cult hits “Heart Attack” (aka “Freelance”) and “Mary is Happy, Mary is Happy.” “Die Tomorrow” premiered
See full article at Variety »

Retooled BAFTA Awards Are More Relevant Than Ever to Americans

  • Variety
Way back in the 20th century, the BAFTAs, which take place Feb. 10, occupied a shifting, uncertain place in the film awards calendar. For much of the 1990s, they acted as a kind of after-party to the long, strenuous haul of Oscar season: taking place a few weeks after the big day in L.A., they were cheerfully divorced from the pressures and rigors of Academy Awards campaigning. And while they preceded the Oscars for years before then, they were seen as very much their own ball game — prestigious, yes, but hardly an essential red-carpet pit stop for Oscar contenders with their eyes on the American prize.

There was occasional overlap between the British Academy and the Oscars, of course, not least when a U.K. film became a crossover hit: It’s hardly a surprise that tony productions from “Lawrence of Arabia” to “Chariots of Fire” to “Shakespeare in Love
See full article at Variety »

The highbrow film critic who was also a fanboy: the genius of Vf Perkins

He eschewed star ratings and saw things others didn’t. Stephen Merchant, Paul Ws Anderson and J Blakeson recall being taught by the great film theorist

In 2006, an elaborate work of graffiti appeared on a wall at the University of Warwick. It depicted the stencilled face of the department’s founder, the film theorist Vf (Victor Francis) Perkins, beaming from within three frames of celluloid. Scrawled next to it was a line of punky text: “Vf Perkins, head & shoulders above the rest”.

Respect for him was not restricted to the Warwick campus. His criticism was admired by film-makers – when François Truffaut empties out a bag of film books in Day for Night, Perkins’s work is among them – and with good reason: he had been among the first to argue for cinema as an art form when the Observer’s CA Lejeune was maintaining that films “can only reproduce. And
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

UK box office preview: 'Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes Of Grindelwald' to cast spell on audiences

UK box office preview: 'Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes Of Grindelwald' to cast spell on audiences
Suspiria’, ’3 Days In Quiberon’ among other openers.

Warner Bros’ fantasy sequel Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes Of Grindelwald is the stand-out opener at the UK box office this weekend.

With a cast including Eddie Redmayne, Jude Law, Katherine Waterston, Ezra Miller and Johnny Depp, the story sees current Defence Against The Dark Arts professor Albus Dumbledore (Law) enlist the help of Newt Scamander (Redmayne) in combatting the growing threat of dark wizard Gellert Grindelwald (Depp).

A spin-off of the hugely successful Harry Potter film series, the first title, Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them, opened to £15.3m in the UK
See full article at ScreenDaily »

UK box office preview: 'The Grinch', 'Widows' look to displace 'Rhapsody'

UK box office preview: 'The Grinch', 'Widows' look to displace 'Rhapsody'
WW1 pic ’They Shall Not Grow Old’ also opening.

Universal’s family animation The Grinch and 20th Century Fox’s Steve McQueen-directed heist thriller Widows are two of the titles looking to usurp Bohemian Rhapsody, after two weeks at the top of the UK box office for the Queen rock biopic.

Looking to tap into the early seasonal market, 3D animation The Grinch is the latest adaptation of Dr. Seuss’s children’s books, about a grumpy green creature who seeks to ruin Christmas for the residents of Whoville. Benedict Cumberbatch voices the titular character, with Cameron Seeley, Rashida Jones,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘One Cut of the Dead’ Review: The Best Zombie Comedy Since ‘Shaun of the Dead’ — Fantasia 2018

‘One Cut of the Dead’ Review: The Best Zombie Comedy Since ‘Shaun of the Dead’ — Fantasia 2018
It’s not saying very much to declare Ueda Shin’ichirô’s debut feature the best zombie comedy since “Shaun of the Dead” — no disrespect to the likes of “Life After Beth” and “Scouts Guide to the Apocalypse,” but the decomposing sub-genre has been in desperate need of fresh brains ever since Edgar Wright brought it back to life. Enter “One Cut of the Dead,” a low-budget, high-concept work of tongue-in-cheek genius that not only matches the best of its predecessors, but also lovingly articulates why people are drawn to these movies in the first place.

Unfolding like some kind of unholy cross between “Day for Night” and “Diary of the Dead,” Ueda’s self-reflexive delight honors and humiliates zombie cinema in equal measure (and also in that order). The infectious fun begins with a virtuosic but strangely casual 37-minute long-take that messes with your expectations from start to finish.
See full article at Indiewire »

Fantasia 2018: Chained For Life

by Jason Adams

Somewhere between Francois Truffaut's Day For Night and Tod Browning's Freaks falls Chained For Life - a rag-tag group of actors (including the ever and always welcome Jess Weixler of Teeth fame) and crew assemble at a hotel turned plastic-surgery spa to shoot a strange little movie, and on the second day a gathering of differently abled persons of the sort that might have long ago populated a circus tent show up to add surreality to the proceedings. 

Writer-director Aaron Schimberg is aware that in 2018 you can't get away with othering these people the way you once might have been able to though, so he goes meta about it. The film-within-the-film reveals itself as a Nazi-tinged rip-off of Browning's Freaks early on, while the day-to-day movie-shooting is all paper plates at the catering tent and make-up chair confessionals. Only slowly do the two halves begin to bleed together,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Karlovy Vary Review: “I Do Not Care If We Go Down in History as Barbarians” is Radu Jude’s ‘Day for Night’

Inverted commas withstanding, “I Do Not Care If We Go Down in History as Barbarians” seems like an awfully long and pretentious thing to call a film. Indeed, it might even suggest that something long and pretentious will be awaiting any viewer of Radu Jude’s latest creation but thankfully, in this case at very least, only one of those adjectives is true.

At 140 minutes, Barbarians (as it will be referred to from here) is indeed rather long, especially when considering that one could easily describe it as a drawn-out dialectic on the responsibility of nations to confront whatever atrocities their government and populous committed in the past. So how on earth is Barbarians so funny and compelling? Well, one reason might be that it’s a movie by Radu Jude, a Romanian New Wave filmmaker who has managed to operate just outside the main spotlight of his gilded colleagues,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Karlovy Vary Film Review: ‘I Do Not Care If We Go Down in History as Barbarians’

  • Variety
Karlovy Vary Film Review: ‘I Do Not Care If We Go Down in History as Barbarians’
To fully deconstruct Romanian director Radu Jude’s meta-on-meta “I Do Not Care If We Go Down in History as Barbarians” (the quote marks are part of the title) would require page upon page of single-spaced footnotes, swathes of Hannah Arendt, a deft repackaging of Walter Benjamin’s “Theses on the Philosophy of History,” and a crash course in Romanian anti-Semitism and the nation’s participation in World War II, amid formal nods to Godard, Straub-Huillet, and Marxist critical theory, while martial music plays in the background. Clocking in at an unwieldy 140 minutes, Jude’s extraordinary opus can be overly didactic and unapologetically intellectual at times, but it is also startling —a provocative, sarcastic, and momentous act of interrogation between the past and the present that escalates to an impasse, with the hands of each locked around the neck of the other.

In a military museum, in front of a
See full article at Variety »

Truffaut's "Day For Night" 45Th Anniversary Screening, L.A. May 10

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

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Laemmle’s Royal Theatre in Los Angeles will be presenting a 45th anniversary screening of Francois Truffaut’s 1973 film Day for Night. The 115-minute film, which won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film and known in its native France as La Nuit américaine (The American Night), stars Jacqueline Bisset, Valentina Cortese, Dani, Alexandra Stewart, Jean-Pierre Aumont, Jean Champion, Jean-Pierre Léaud and François Truffaut and has been referred to as the most beloved film ever made about filmmaking. It will be screened on Thursday, May 10, 2018 at 7:30 pm.

Please Note: At press time, Actress Jacqueline Bisset is scheduled to appear in person for a discussion about the film following the screening.

From the press release:

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.com/ac.

Day For Night

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.
See full article at CinemaRetro »
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