Cinderella Liberty (1973) - News Poster

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John Williams Breaks Own Record with 52nd Oscar Nomination for Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

John Williams Breaks Own Record with 52nd Oscar Nomination for Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
John Williams is only getting better with age.

The renowned composer scored his 52nd Academy Award nomination for Best Original Score for his work in Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker on Monday.

Williams, 87, broke his own record with the nomination. The only other person Williams trails behind is Walt Disney, who received 59 Academy Award nominations including 22 total award wins, according to Forbes.

Williams has won a total of five Oscars for Schindler’s List, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Star Wars, Jaws and Fiddler on the Roof.

His first Oscar nomination came from composing the score for the 1967 film Valley of the Dolls.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘Star Wars’ Composer John Williams Nabs 71st Grammy Nom 58 Years After His First

  • Variety
Composer John Williams received two Grammy nominations, as announced yesterday, bringing his grand total to 71 nominations, with 24 wins to date.

Williams was nominated in the composing and arranging field. His “Galaxy’s Edge Symphonic Suite,” written for the new “Star Wars”-themed park at Disneyland, was nominated for best instrumental composition, while his arrangement of “Hedwig’s Theme,” the best-known piece from the “Harry Potter” films, for violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter’s all-Williams album, was cited for best instrumental arrangement.

According to official Grammy statistics, these are the legendary film composer’s 70th and 71st nominations.

Surprisingly, considering his 58-year history of Grammy attention (dating back to his 1961 nod for his TV score “Checkmate”), he is not the most-nominated film composer. He is now just one nomination behind his colleague Henry Mancini, who amassed 72 nominations before his death in 1994.

Quincy Jones – who sometimes toiled alongside Williams during their Universal Television stints
See full article at Variety »

We met Marsha Mason!

Last week we had the privilege of attending a live podcast recording of "Live at the Lortel" in the West Village where the guest was four-time Oscar nominee Marsha Mason. While a good portion of the interview focused on her new play "Little Gem" and her deep devotion to the stage, all of her Oscar nominated performances got at least some airtime. (She never intended to be a film actress but then Cinderella Liberty kind of fell into her lap). 

The piece of the interview we found most fascinating was hearing her talk about her work on Chapter Two...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Oscar Flashback: ‘Live and Let Die’ no match for ‘The Way We Were’ in Best Original Song

Oscar Flashback: ‘Live and Let Die’ no match for ‘The Way We Were’ in Best Original Song
This article marks Part 12 of the Gold Derby series analyzing 84 years of Best Original Song at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at the timeless tunes recognized in this category, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the winners.

The 1973 Oscar nominees in Best Original Song were:

“(You’re So) Nice to Be Around” from “Cinderella Liberty

Live and Let Die” from “Live and Let Die

Love,” from “Robin Hood

“All That Love Went to Waste” from “A Touch of Class

The Way We Were” from “The Way We Were

Won and should’ve won: “The Way We Were” from “The Way We Were

The title song from “The Way We Were,” composed by the brilliant, Egot-winning Marvin Hamlisch, alongside Alan and Marilyn Bergman, is a dreamy, haunting, immensely moving piece, performed splendidly by the incomparable Barbra Streisand. The film’s leading lady strikes just the right notes here,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Showbiz History: Marsha marries Neil, Barbra is "Guilty," and Blue is the Warmest Color

7 random things that happened on this day (October 25th) in showbiz history

Neil Simon & Marsha Mason

1881 Pablo Picasso is born in Malaga Spain. He's been played onscreen by everyone from Antonio Banderas to Anthony Hopkins. Okay so just guys named Tony... never mind. 

1973 Legendary Playwright Neil Simon marries the then little-known actress Marsha Mason, who is acting in his Broadway production "The Good Doctor" just months after his first wife's death. Mason's screen career takes off the very next year with an Oscar nomination for Cinderella Liberty. Then she & Simon make films together that Oscar really loves for the next decade like Goodbye Girl, Only When I Laugh, and Chapter Two... 
See full article at FilmExperience »

Cinderella Liberty

A real peach of a ’70s New Hollywood picture, Mark Rydell and Darryl Ponicsan’s story of a sailor on extended leave is sentimental neorealism — a tough street story, but with the pessimism removed. Poolroom hustler Marsha Mason and sailor-adrift James Caan are a beautiful couple in the making — although the whole world seems against them.

Cinderella Liberty

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1973 / Color / 2:35 anamorphic widescreen / 117 min. / Street Date July 17, 2018 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95

Starring: James Caan, Marsha Mason, Kirk Calloway, Eli Wallach, Burt Young, Allyn Ann McLerie, Dabney Coleman, Sally Kirkland, Bruno Kirby.

Cinematography: Vilmos Zsigmond

Film Editor: Patrick Kennedy

Production Design: Leon Ericksen

Original Music: John Williams

Written by Darryl Ponicsan from his novel

Produced and Directed by Mark Rydell

Mark Rydell’s satisfying tough-love romance is yet more evidence why the early 1970s is still considered one of the most creative times in Hollywood. The
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Glenda Jackson: Tony Award for ‘Three Tall Women’ will make her 24th Triple Crown winner

Glenda Jackson: Tony Award for ‘Three Tall Women’ will make her 24th Triple Crown winner
Glenda Jackson is almost certain to win her first Tony Award on Sunday for her acclaimed performance in the first Broadway production of Edward Albee’s 1991 Pulitzer Prize-winning play “Three Tall Women.” She will become the 24th performer to win the Triple Crown of show business awards and cap off a comeback after an absence of almost a quarter of a century.

Jackson walked away from acting in 1992 to began a second career in politics, winning election to the British parliament. Yes, Ronald Reagan did the same thing but he had never reached the level of acclaim and success that Jackson had in Hollywood.

She is one of only 14 two-time Best Actress Oscar winners and she pulled off this double act in just four years. What makes that even more surprising is that she expressed a certain disdain for awards and didn’t attend any of the four Academy Awards
See full article at Gold Derby »

Freebie and the Bean

Here’s how one pushed the limits of good taste in 1974. James Caan and Alan Arkin run the gamut of racist, raunchy, sexist & homophobic jokes as bad boy cops breaking the rules, and director Richard Rush delivers some impressive, expensive action stunts on location in San Francisco. Does it get a pass because it’s ‘outrageous?’ The public surely thought so. If the star chemistry works the excess won’t matter. With Valerie Harper, Loretta Swit and Jack Kruschen.

Freebie and the Bean

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1974 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 113 min. / Street Date August 8, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Alan Arkin, James Caan, Valerie Harper, Loretta Swit, Jack Kruschen, Mike Kellin, Paul Koslo, Linda Marsh, Alex Rocco.

Cinematography: Laszlo Kovacs

Film Editors: Michael MacLean, Fredric Steinkamp

Original Music: Dominic Frontiere

Written by Robert Kaufman, Floyd Mutrux

Produced and Directed by Richard Rush

‘Buddy’ pictures have been around forever, but I
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Richard Linklater's Last Flag Flying to open 55th New York Film Festival by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2017-06-14 15:04:53

Richard Linklater's Last Flag Flying to open 55th New York Film Festival Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Film Society of Lincoln Center (Flag Day in the Us is today, June 14) announced on Monday that the World Premiere of Richard Linklater's Last Flag Flying - co-written with Darryl Ponicsan (Cinderella Liberty, The Last Detail), produced by Ginger Sledge, John Sloss, and Thomas Lee Wright, starring Steve Carell, Bryan Cranston and Laurence Fishburne - is the Opening Night Gala selection of the New York Film Festival. Linklater's terrific Boyhood team of cinematographer Shane F Kelly, editor Sandra Adair, and costume designer Kari Perkins worked also on his latest.

Kent Jones: "Last Flag Flying is many things at once - infectiously funny, quietly shattering, celebratory, mournful, meditative, intimate, expansive, vastly entertaining, and …" Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Festival Director and Selection Committee Chair is Kent Jones. Dennis Lim, Fslc Director of Programming; Florence Almozini,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Happy 75th to Four-Time Oscar Nominee Marsha Mason

by Eric Blume

Marsha Mason speaking at an event in 2015Today marks the 75th birthday of Marsha Mason, one of Hollywood’s leading ladies from the 1970s. Celebrating her is easy because she brought a lot of light and joy to screens for a decade and a half with her toothy vibrance and warm energy.

It’s strange to think that contemporary young movie audiences don’t even know Mason, since she scored four Oscar nominations for Best Actress over nine years! Her first nomination came in 1973 for Mark Rydell’s Cinderella Liberty, where she plays a prostitute with an 11-year-old mixed race son. Her rapport with co-star James Caan and the young actor who plays her son has a scrappy grace to it, and it’s a winning performance.

Mason’s other three Oscar nominations came from roles written or tailored expressly for her by her then-husband, Neil Simon.
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Reivers

Steve McQueen spent most of the 1960s avoiding lightweight movie roles -- only to do well with his winning comedy-drama performance in William Faulkner's most cheerful tale of old Mississippi. Get set for music by John Williams and an exciting climactic horse race. In storytelling terms this show would seem to have given Steven Spielberg a few ideas. The Reivers Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1969 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 106 min. / Street Date August 25, 2015 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Steve McQueen, Rupert Crosse, Mitch Vogel, Sharon Farrell, Will Geer, Ruth White, Michael Constantine, Clifton James, Juano Hernandez, Lonny Chapman, Diane Ladd, Ellen Geer, Dub Taylor, Allyn Ann McLerie, Charles Tyner, Burgess Meredith. Cinematography Richard Moore Film Editor Thomas Stanford Original Music John Williams Written by Irving Ravetch, Harriet Frank Jr. from the book by William Faulkner Produced by Irving Ravetch, Robert Relyea Directed by Mark Rydell

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

What? This
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Retro Quickie: Cinderella Liberty (1973)

File Under: I have had this Netflix disc out for so long and it really has to be returned to unclog my queue. -Nathaniel

You got a terrific knack for being nice and a prick all at the same time.

Have any of you ever seen Cinderella Liberty? Back when we were doing our 1973 celebration, I rented it since it was the sole Best Actress nomination I hadn't seen from that year. Marsha Mason plays a prostitute with a heart of... well, not gold exactly. But she's got one. She's raising Doug, her biracial teenager (Kirk Calloway nominated for Best Newcomer at the Golden Globes) on her own but she's doing a pretty shit job of it. Enter: James Caan, fresh off the double whammy star-making years of Brian's Song (1971) and The Godfather (1972), as a sailor named John Baggs Jr. who hooks up with her. In actuality it's Baggs' story
See full article at FilmExperience »

News Nuggets: Meryl Streep to play opera diva Maria Callas in HBO's 'Master Class'?'

News Nuggets: Meryl Streep to play opera diva Maria Callas in HBO's 'Master Class'?'
Columnist Liz Smith gets to the bottom of the rumors that Meryl Streep will play the legendary opera singer Maria Callas. She spoke with director Mike Nichols, who is in charge of the upcoming HBO production "Master Class," and he confirms the story from Streep's press agent Leslee Dart. The Terrence McNally play is about the late-in-life diva as she now is a teacher following the death of her lover, Aristotle Onassis. Various Broadway versions has seen Zoe Caldwell, Patti LuPone, Dixie Carter, and Tyne Daly in the lead role (with Caldwell winning a Tony Award in 1996). Will Streep and Nichols add yet another Emmy Award to their awards mantels? Huffington Post. -Break- Longtime character actor Eli Wallach dies at age 98. His lengthy feature film resume included "The Magnificent Seven," "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," "Baby Doll," "The Misfits," "Cinderella Liberty," and "The Godfather: Part III." He...'
See full article at Gold Derby »

'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly' Star Eli Wallach Passes Away at Age 98

'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly' Star Eli Wallach Passes Away at Age 98
Legendary actor Eli Wallach, best known for his role as the villainous Tuco in The Good the Bad and the Ugly, passed away in New York City yesterday at the age of 98. The actor's passing was confirmed by his daughter, Katherine.

Born in 1915 in the Red Hook neighborhood of Brooklyn, Eli Wallach began studying acting after receiving a B.A. and M.S. in education from the University of Texas and City College of New York. His acting ambitions were cut short when he was drafted to serve in World War II, but he began acting in several plays upon his return to New York in 1945. In 1948, he was one of the 20 core actors who helped found The Actor's Studio, where he honed his method acting craft.

He won a Tony Award in 1951 for his performance in Tennessee Williams' The Rose Tattoo, which was directed by Elia Kazan. Tennessee Williams
See full article at MovieWeb »

Eli Wallach, 'The Good, the Bad & the Ugly' Star, Dead at 98

Eli Wallach, 'The Good, the Bad & the Ugly' Star, Dead at 98
He played cotton-gin owners, military officers, monsignors, rabbis, truck drivers, Shakespearean heroes — even a Batman villain. But Eli Wallach, who passed away at age 98 due to causes unknown, is best known to a generation of moviegoers as the ultimate bandolero-wearing bandito, thanks to two iconic roles: Calvera, the leader of the frontier thugs who terrorize a Mexican village in The Magnificent Seven (1960); and Tuco, the "ugly" of Sergio Leone's epic Spaghetti Western The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966). When you think of a stubbled outlaw villain, the kind
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Allan Arbus obituary

Character actor who played the psychiatrist Major Sidney Freedman in the TV comedy M*A*S*H

The long-running Us television comedy M*A*S*H, set during the Korean war, was often perceived as an allegorical look at the Vietnam war, which was still being fought when it began in 1972. But the television show focused less on the specific mindsets of Vietnam which had driven the nihilistic Robert Altman film on which it was based, and in tone was much closer to Joseph Heller's novel Catch-22, with its comedic take on the intrinsic absurdity of war.

No character brought that home more clearly than Major Sidney Freedman, the psychiatrist who appeared in 12 episodes over the show's 11-year run. Freedman was played by Allan Arbus, who has died aged 95. His approach to the mental health of the soldiers, and medics, at the 4077th mobile army surgical hospital unit relied
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Allan Arbus obituary

Character actor who played the psychiatrist Major Sidney Freedman in the TV comedy M*A*S*H

The long-running Us television comedy M*A*S*H, set during the Korean war, was often perceived as an allegorical look at the Vietnam war, which was still being fought when it began in 1972. But the television show focused less on the specific mindsets of Vietnam which had driven the nihilistic Robert Altman film on which it was based, and in tone was much closer to Joseph Heller's novel Catch-22, with its comedic take on the intrinsic absurdity of war.

No character brought that home more clearly than Major Sidney Freedman, the psychiatrist who appeared in 12 episodes over the show's 11-year run. Freedman was played by Allan Arbus, who has died aged 95. His approach to the mental health of the soldiers, and medics, at the 4077th mobile army surgical hospital unit relied
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

M*A*S*H Actor Allan Arbus Dies at 95

  • PEOPLE.com
M*A*S*H Actor Allan Arbus Dies at 95
Allan Arbus, best known for his dozen appearances as the sarcastic psychiatrist Maj. Sidney Freedman on the '70s series M*A*S*H, died Friday at his Los Angeles home, his daughter, photographer Amy Arbus, told The New York Times. He was 95. In addition to numerous roles on TV and in movies, from Matlock and Curb Your Enthusiasm (in 2000) to Cinderella Liberty and Damien: Omen II, the New York City native, during his military service in the army, had been a photographer - as was, notably, his wife, Diane Arbus. The two met when Allan was an employee in
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Last Resort, Ep 1.10: “Blue Water” sees both Chaplin and Sam Kendal continue to get pushed beyond their endurance

Last Resort, Season 1, Episode 10: “Blue Water”

Written by Eileen Myers and Julie Siege

Directed by Bill Gierhart

Airs Thursdays at 8pm (Et) on ABC

As the USS Colorado’s blockade and fight against the Us government continues, the desperation of both the locals and the crew of the sub have become increasingly unpredictable and violent. While last week’s visit from the Cinderella Liberty was meant to bring some respite, both in the form of supplies, and in allowing some of the crew to go back home, last week’s events effectively put an end to that in the near future. Now, with Chaplin finding it more difficult to maintain harmony amongst his crew, and Kendal off trying to find Christine, the captain’s resolve would be tested even more strongly than ever before, and this week’s episode took a walk down that path, revisiting the global ramifications
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Last Resort Review: Strings Attached

  • TVfanatic
There were plenty of offers on the table for assistance on this week's Last Resort, but they all had strings attached. I don't think anyone was getting to Bali to see the "Blue Water."

Didn't that sound like a lovely day dream? After Christine's abduction in "Cinderella Liberty" you'd have thought she and Sam would have earned a lounge in the infinity pool at some Bali resort. Unfortunately, a dream was all it was.

The rescue of Christine felt like it was on fast forward, but with only a three episodes left in the series, I suppose it had to be that way. Sam and James jumped from the island to the Philippines in record time and from there Christine's actual rescue happened so quickly that if you blinked you might have missed it.

But that was okay with me. What I really wanted to see was the reunion between this couple.
See full article at TVfanatic »
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