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Bad Company (1972) Poster

(1972)

Goofs

Jump to: Anachronisms (4)  | Character error (1)  | Continuity (2)  | Factual errors (1)

Anachronisms 

The Marshal asks Big Joe if he knew Curly Bill Brocius in '53, implying Curly Bill was already an outlaw in 1853. Curly Bill Brocius was 8 years old in 1853.
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Although cartridge bullets were available in 1863, they were rare. In this movie all firearms use cartridges.
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The pistols used in the film are long barrel Colt 1873 SAAs (Peacemakers). These were not patented until a decade after the film takes place.
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Nolan uses the word "poontang." The film is set in the 1860s but the word was not coined until the 1920s.
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Character error 

Jake praises Loney for suggesting they rob the stagecoach, but it is his brother Jim Bob who made the comment.
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Continuity 

For the boys' meal at gunpoint with the farmer, the food is repeatedly described as being "sowbelly and turnip greens", which is a boiled dish, yet what they are eating is mashed potatoes and uncooked spinach leaves.
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When Jake is describing what Simms is doing at the stagecoach, he says, "He's opening the door ... he's getting in ... he's closing the door," but when we see the stagecoach, it's driving away and Simms has only just managed to open the door.
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Factual errors 

When the boys cross the Missouri River from St. Joseph, one utters the words, "Say goodbye to the U.S.A." After January 29, 1861, what was across the river from St. Joe was the state of Kansas, so they never left the U.S.A. In fact, by the 1850s, to ride out of the U.S.A. they would have needed to have gone to the Canadian or Mexican border. Though technically crossing into New Mexico or Arizona would have also achieved this as they were still territories, Arizona did not become the 48th state until 1912.
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See also

Trivia | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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