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(1972–1983)

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William Bogert, Who Appeared in ‘War Games,’ ‘Small Wonder,’ Dies at 83

  • Variety
William Bogert, Who Appeared in ‘War Games,’ ‘Small Wonder,’ Dies at 83
TV, film and theater actor William Bogert, who appeared in a recurring role on 1980s sitcom “Small Wonder” and in films such as “War Games,” died Jan. 12 in New York. He was 83.

On “Small Wonder,” which ran from 1985 to 1989, Bogert played Brandon Brindle, the Lawsons’ neighbor and Harriet’s father who became Ted Lawson’s boss after stealing his ideas.

On Dave Chappelle’s “Chapelle’s Show,” Bogert was Kent Wallace, the host of “Frontline” spoofs.

Bogert also appeared in the well-known political ad “Confessions of a Republican” in 1964, stumping for Lyndon B. Johnson. He returned to the character in a 2016 Hillary Clinton campaign video, explaining that although he actually had been a Republican when he made the 1964 commercial and all his life, he felt now that Donald Trump was not the kind of Republication he could endorse. “He scares me,” Bogert says about Trump, repeating his assessment of Barry Goldwater from decades before.
See full article at Variety »

68 Whiskey: Season Two? Has the Paramount Series Been Cancelled or Renewed?

Vulture Watch

Is this series the new M*A*S*H? Has the 68 Whiskey TV show been cancelled or renewed for a second season on Paramount Network? The television vulture is watching all the latest cancellation and renewal news, so this page is the place to track the status of 68 Whiskey, season two. Bookmark it, or subscribe for the latest updates. Remember, the television vulture is watching your shows. Are you?

What's This TV Show About?

Airing on the Paramount Network cable channel, 68 Whiskey stars Sam Keeley, Jeremy Tardy, Gage Golightly, Cristina Rodlo, Beth Riesgraf, Lamont Thompson, Nicholas Coombe, and Derek Theler, with Usman Ally, Lamont Thompson, Artur Benson, and Aaron Glenane in recurring roles. The show follows a multicultural band of Army medics stationed in Afghanistan on a base nicknamed “The Orphanage.” Together, the medics navigate a dangerous and sometimes absurd world,
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Can ‘Parasite’ become first Palme d’Or winner to claim Best Picture Oscar since ‘Marty’ did it 64 years ago?

Can ‘Parasite’ become first Palme d’Or winner to claim Best Picture Oscar since ‘Marty’ did it 64 years ago?
With the six Oscar nominations Bong Joon Ho‘s “Parasite” scored on Monday morning, the film became the latest to have won the prestigious Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival and score an Oscar nomination for Best Picture. Only one film has actually succeeded in winning both of those honors: Delbert Mann‘s “Marty,” which prevailed in 1955.

Since the Palme d’Or was established, 15 other films have managed to take the top prize at Cannes and make it into the Best Picture race: “Marty” (1955), “Friendly Persuasion” (1957), “M*A*S*H” (1970), “The Conversation” (1974), “Taxi Driver” (1976), “Apocalypse Now” (1979), “All That Jazz” (1979), “Missing” (1982), “The Mission” (1986), “The Piano” (1993), “Pulp Fiction” (1994), “Secrets & Lies” (1996), “The Pianist” (2002), “The Tree of Life” (2011) and “Amour” (2012).

See 2020 Oscar nominations: Full list of Academy Awards nominees in all 24 categories

The top prize from the French film festival is not always a reliable barometer for what will get in at the Oscars.
See full article at Gold Derby »

10 Celebrities You Forgot Were Guest Stars On M*A*S*H

As far as sitcoms go, it doesn't get much better than M*A*S*H. The wartime comedy was never afraid to tackle serious subjects regarding the conflict and its effect on humanity. At the same time, it could still bring on the laughs like it was no one's business. The core cast helped keep the show afloat for twelve years, though some cast changes occurred along the way.

Related: 10 M*A*S*H Memes That Remind You Of How Great It Was

In addition to this, numerous recurring characters and guest stars contributed their talents to several episodes. Many of these faces made their appearance long before they hit fame, so it'll be interesting to see them as the following ten entries list ten guest stars you forgot were on M*A*S*H.
See full article at Screen Rant »

68 Whiskey on Paramount Network: When does Ron Howard and Brian Grazer produced war dramedy air in 2020?

Paramount Network and top producers Brian Grazer and Ron Howard presented their new dramedy 68 Whiskey at the Television Critics’Association winter press tour today along with Paramount Network. Were you a fan of M*A*S*H? Ensembles set in stressful war situations? Paramount Network’s new military dramedy, 68 Whiskey is taking a page from the format and tone of “M*A*S*H” — with Korea swapped out for Afghanistan as the setting for Us Army personnel treating soldiers injured or killed in wartime. The series is filmed in Santa Clarita, California, which series creator Roberto Benabib said the cast and crew often referred to as Santa Clarita-stan. He also […]
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Will ‘Parasite’ Work as an HBO Miniseries? (Column)

  • Variety
Will ‘Parasite’ Work as an HBO Miniseries? (Column)
There’s a time-honored tradition of turning celebrated movies into television series. A lot of them have ended up as sitcoms: “The Odd Couple,” “M*A*S*H,” “Alice” (spun out of Martin Scorsese’s 1974 landmark “Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore”). But not all of them. Did you know that “Casablanca” was turned into two different TV series, one in 1955 and one in 1983? (The latter starred David Soul as Rick Blaine!) In 1976, they tried it with “Serpico.” Sometimes, a series can seem a true extension of the movie it’s adapted from — that’s what happened with “Fargo” and “Dear White People.” Sometimes, the movie that spawned a series will come to seem a mere footnote to the show — that’s what happened with “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and “Friday Night Lights.” And in the case of “Parenthood” (though it took two tries to get it right), a movie can be turned into
See full article at Variety »

René Auberjonois obituary

American actor and singer best remembered for his roles in the 1970 film M*A*S*H and TV’s Star Trek and Boston Legal

The actor René Auberjonois, who has died aged 79 of cancer, had a distinctive face – beaky, birdlike, inquisitive – and a gift for comic haughtiness. His biggest successes came on television: as well as appearing in guest roles on everything from The Rockford Files to Grey’s Anatomy, Starsky and Hutch to Frasier, he was a regular on three popular and vastly different shows, each of which required him to play variations on his stuffed-shirt persona.

In the sitcom Benson, a spin-off from the irreverent 1970s television hit Soap, he was the prissy, hypochondriac chief of staff to a Us governor; he joined the show in its second season in 1980 and remained on board until its cancellation six years later. He was seen throughout the seven seasons of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993-99) as Odo,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

René Auberjonois, actor who starred in M*A*S*H*, Star Trek and Benson, dies aged 79

In a career spanning six decades, the actor worked on Broadway, in Hollywood’s 70s golden age and TV

René Auberjonois, a prolific actor best known for his roles on the television shows Benson and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and his part in the 1970 film M*A*S*H*, has died aged 79.

The actor died on Sunday at his home in Los Angeles of metastatic lung cancer, his son Rèmy-Luc Auberjonois said.

Related: David Ogden Stiers, actor who shone in M*A*S*H, dies at 75
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The 10 Highest Rated Episodes Of Three's Company, According To IMDb

Back in the late 1970s and early '80s, sitcoms like M*A*S*H and All in the Family ruled television. They were funny, entertaining, and loved by audiences, but they also covered issues previously considered taboo for broadcast television, helping people discuss and better understand those issues. The fact that television was evolving in the '70s directly led to Three's Company, one of the first American sitcoms to utilize double entendres and innuendo as a direct source for comedy. Based on the British series Man About the House, Three's Company follows three roommates: klutzy but clever Jack, level-headed and confident Janet, and ditzy blonde Chrissy.

Related: 10 '80s Sitcoms That Deserve A Reboot

In the show's pilot, Jack pretends to be gay so that he can move in with Chrissy and Janet without upsetting their strict landlord, Mr. Roper. He isn't interested in his roommates particularly; he just needs a place to live.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Afm Flashback: 'M*A*S*H's Last Shoot in Malibu Creek Broke Records

Afm Flashback: 'M*A*S*H's Last Shoot in Malibu Creek Broke Records
Nestled in the Santa Monica Mountains, the 6,000-acre Malibu Creek State Park has served as a backdrop for thousands of movie and TV scenes reaching all the way back to 1927, when it stood in as the Scottish Highlands for a Lillian Gish movie called Annie Laurie. Planet of the Apes (1968) and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) also shot there. But for visitors, it’s only M*A*S*H that matters.

The CBS series, coming on the heels of the 1970 Robert Altman film, filmed there from 1972-83. The location remains open to the public, as long as you pay the $12 park ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

12 Military-Themed TV Shows to Binge-Watch on Veterans Day

  • The Wrap
12 Military-Themed TV Shows to Binge-Watch on Veterans Day
Some of the most beloved shows in TV history feature members of the military. You might remember Hawkeye Pierce and Radar O’Reilly from “M*A*S*H,” the breakout star of the “Andy Griffith Show,” Gomer Pyle, whose spinoff “Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.” ran for five years.

Mr. T shot to fame in the early ’80s by playing a veteran in “The A-Team as B.A. Baracus. Younger audiences may remember seeing pop-star Jesse McCartney in the final season of “Army Wives” — and fans of “The Office” can catch one of John Krasinski’s latest roles as the title character in “Jack Ryan.”

With Veteran’s Day taking place this Monday, here’s a list of military-themed TV shows to binge to in honor of our veterans.

“Hogan’s Heroes”

This sitcom aired from 1965 from 1971, and was set in a German Prisoner of War (Pow) camp in WWII. It followed Colonel Robert E.
See full article at The Wrap »

’68 Whiskey’: Derek Theler, Beth Riesgraf & Lamont Thompson Among Six Cast In Paramount Network Series

  • Deadline
’68 Whiskey’: Derek Theler, Beth Riesgraf & Lamont Thompson Among Six Cast In Paramount Network Series
Derek Theler, Beth Riesgraf and Lamont Thompson are set as series regulars in Paramount Network’s drama 68 Whiskey, an adaptation of Israeli TV series Charlie Golf One, from Imagine Television Studios, the TV arm of Ron Howard and Brian Grazer’s Imagine Entertainment, and CBS TV Studios. Additionally, Usman Ally, Artur Benson and Aaron Glenane (Picnic at Hanging Rock) are set for recurring roles. They join previously announced cast members Sam Keeley, Gage Golightly, Cristina Rodlo, Jeremy Tardy and Nicholas Coombe. Production on season 1 is currently underway with the series scheduled to premiere on Paramount Network in early 2020.

Written by The Brink co-creator Roberto Benabib, the adaptation, in the vein of M*A*S*H, follows a multicultural mix of men and women
See full article at Deadline »

Patrick Swayze movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Dirty Dancing,’ ‘Ghost,’ ‘Road House’

  • Gold Derby
Patrick Swayze movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Dirty Dancing,’ ‘Ghost,’ ‘Road House’
Although his films for the most part weren’t award winners or critical successes, Patrick Swayze starred in a stream of commercially successful movies that have since gone on to attain cult status. Two set the standard for the iconic 1980s Brat-Pack teen movies, and two films that have become a huge part of pop culture. Men wanted to be him, women loved him and he is one of the actors that comes to mind as one we lost much too soon.

Patrick Wayne Swayze was born on August 18, 1952, in Houston, the second of five children. His mother owned a dance studio, and Swayze became an accomplished dancer, although he was bullied in school for his training in classical ballet. As a teen, he honed several skills besides dance, including ice skating, acting in school plays, martial arts and football. His hopes for a football scholarship were dashed when he injured his knee.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Patrick Swayze movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Patrick Swayze movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Although his films for the most part weren’t award winners or critical successes, Patrick Swayze starred in a stream of commercially successful movies that have since gone on to attain cult status. Two set the standard for the iconic 1980s Brat-Pack teen movies, and two films that have become a huge part of pop culture. Men wanted to be him, women loved him and he is one of the actors that comes to mind as one we lost much too soon.

Patrick Wayne Swayze was born on August 18, 1952, in Houston, the second of five children. His mother owned a dance studio, and Swayze became an accomplished dancer, although he was bullied in school for his training in classical ballet. As a teen, he honed several skills besides dance, including ice skating, acting in school plays, martial arts and football. His hopes for a football scholarship were dashed when he injured his knee.
See full article at Gold Derby »

M*A*S*H: 6 Best Friendships (& 4 Worst)

Over the course of 11 seasons and more than 250 episodes, M*A*S*H made medical and military service in the middle of a war look fun and welcoming. Set during the Korean War, the wartime sitcom introduced audiences to a host of unforgettable characters.

Related: Chernobyl: 10 Other Historical Events From The Soviet Union That Deserve Their Own Miniseries

While they started out as the usual gang of comical misfits, the likes of Captain Franklin “Hawkeye” Pierce (Alan Alda) and Major Margaret “Hot Lips” Houlihan (Loretta Swit) soon grew to become some of the most memorable military personnel to grace pop culture. With each passing episode, the characters grew close to one another, strengthening the bonds they had while also bringing out the worst in some. Here are the 6 best and 4 worst friendships to be formed in M*A*S*H.
See full article at Screen Rant »

M*A*S*H: The 10 Saddest Moments, Ranked

Over the course of 11 season and more than 200 episodes, M*A*S*H never failed to make its loyal fans laugh, cry, or both. Even if it was a sitcom, M*A*S*H was also known for having its fair share of heartbreaking moments. Since the series is set in the middle of an active warzone, the tragedies that interrupt the base’s hilarious shenanigans and witty banters are sadly a part of the characters’ everyday lives.

Related: 10 Best World War II Movies, Ranked

These moments defined the show as one of the best dramedies ever aired on television, and even today the impact and influence of these scenes can be felt. Whether it's a death in the battlefield or someone’s emotions getting wrecked, here are the 10 saddest moments in M*A*S*H.
See full article at Screen Rant »

M*A*S*H*: 12 Hidden Details About The Main Characters Everyone Missed

Even years after it concluded, M*A*S*H remains one of TV’s most influential beloved sitcoms. The laughs and tears of the medical staff based in the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea captured the hearts of millions of viewers, immortalizing a host of memorable characters such as Hawkeye, Bj Hunnict, Margaret, and more in the annals of pop culture history.

Related: 5 Things Black Mirror Did Better Than The Twilight Zone (& 5 Things Twilight Zone Did Better)

And yet as memorable as their names, quotes, and hijinks may be, there are some things about the surgeons and servicemen of the 4077th that not everybody knows about. But considering the show’s length and the fact that it lasted three times longer than the actual Korean War, this isn’t much of a surprise. Here are 12 hidden details about the main characters of M*A*S*H that everyone missed.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Bill Hader gunning to be the 11th person to snag consecutive Best Comedy Actor Emmys

Bill Hader gunning to be the 11th person to snag consecutive Best Comedy Actor Emmys
After pulling off a minor surprise last year, Bill Hader looks poised to defend his Best Comedy Actor Emmy crown for “Barry.” He’s way out in front in our early odds, and should he prevail, he’d be the latest repeat champ in this category.

Fifteen men have won this category more than once and a whopping 10 of them did so with at least one run of back-to-back victories. All of the three-time and record four-time champs won at least two in a row. The five who defy this trend are all two-time champs: Jack Klugman, Alan Alda, Judd Hirsch, Ted Danson and Richard Mulligan.

Not counting Hader, in this century, just six people have won comedy actor once for the same role. This decade produced three sets of consecutive wins — two by Jim ParsonsThe Big Bang Theory,” 2010-11, 2013-14) and one by Jeffrey Tambor. Only Jon Cryer and Donald Glover,
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Veep’ would be the rare Best Comedy Series to win for its final season

‘Veep’ would be the rare Best Comedy Series to win for its final season
If “Veep” were to win the Best Comedy Series Emmy for its final season, it would be a rarity in the television academy’s history. Emmy voters are notoriously unsentimental, scarcely handing out trophies for the final season of a show no matter how beloved. Over the course of Emmy history, only five comedies have won Best Comedy Series with their final season, with voters overlooking shows they once showered with wins, like “30 Rock,” “Frasier,” “M*A*S*H” and “All in the Family.” Can “Veep” beat the odds this year in a highly competitive field?

The last sitcom to win Best Comedy Series for its farewell season was “Everybody Loves Raymond” in 2005. Before that, there was “Barney Miller” in 1982, “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” in 1977, “The Dick Van Dyke Show” in 1966 and “Caesar’s Hour” in 1957. There could be any number of reasons for this lack of final season embrace, from
See full article at Gold Derby »

Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Ed Asner, Elliott Gould Seek SAG-AFTRA Board Seats

  • Variety
Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Ed Asner, Elliott Gould Seek SAG-AFTRA Board Seats
Ed Asner, Elliott Gould and Jonathan Taylor Thomas are seeking SAG-AFTRA national board seats as members of presidential candidate Matthew Modine’s progressive Membership First slate.

Asner is the former president of the Screen Actors Guild, serving two terms from 1981 to 1985, and winning five Emmys for his role as Lou Grant and two others for his work on “Rich Man, Poor Man” and “Roots.” Gould is a former board member who was nominated for an Oscar for “Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice” and is best known for his work on Robert Altman’s “M*A*S*H” and “The Long Goodbye.” Taylor Thomas is known for his roles on “Home Improvement” and voicing young Simba in 1994’s “The Lion King.”

Current board members Frances Fisher, Diane Ladd and Patricia Richardson are seeking re-election as Membership First reps. Jennifer Beals, Neve Campbell and Rob Schneider are also part of the slate,
See full article at Variety »
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