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Frankenstein Conquers the World (1965) Poster

Trivia

Due to the success of this film in Germany, German distributors started calling most subsequent kaiju film, especially Godzilla films Frankenstein.
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In the original plot, Frankenstein fought Godzilla. That was scrapped because Toho felt that the proposed fight scenes were too implausible.
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The film was a Japanese-U.S. co-production. The versions released in Japan and the United States were nearly identical, though the U.S. version was about 3 minutes shorter. The international version, for release outside the United States and Japan, was longer and replaced the earthquake ending with Frankenstein battling a giant octopus.
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One proposed title was "Frankenstein vs. the Giant Devil Fish". One lobby poster features the title monster fighting a giant octopus. That scene was deleted from the film, but a similar duel was incorporated in the sequel, The War of the Gargantuas (1966) features a battle between Gaira, the Green Gargantua, and a giant octopus.
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In its original release, it was billed as the first film collaboration between Japan and the U.S.
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The film's story came from an unused 1962 screenplay titled "King Kong vs. Frankenstein", written by King Kong (1933) special effects technician Willis H. O'Brien. In the story, Dr. Frankenstein's grandson created a 20 ft. monster from the remains of animals, and that monster ended up fighting Kong. The story never got past the screenplay, thought concept art depicting Kong and the Frankenstein monster exist. The screenplay was given to John Beck, who sold it to Toho, who made King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962) and Frankenstein Conquers the World (1965). O'Brien was never paid for his contribution.
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Akira Ifukube reused some of the score from Varan the Unbelievable (1958).
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Publicity materials issued by American International credited actress Sueko Togami with a major part in this film. Sueko Togami is actually the name of Kumi Mizuno's character.
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Instead of filming a real horse, Eiji Tsuburaya included a fake-looking puppet in the scene when Baragon tears through a farm. He was well aware of how unconvincing it looked, but decided not to go with a more realistic effect, because the puppet horse was in his own admission "funny". Tsuburaya was well known for his jocular approach to his films.
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In addition to the giant octopus sequence, the American producers also requested Toho shoot alternate footage of Frankenstein on the loose in Hiroshima. Unlike the alternate ending, however, these new shots were utilized in the American theatrical release.
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In the English language version several of the characters are voiced by Paul Frees.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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