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77 Sunset Strip (TV Series 1958–1964) Poster

(1958–1964)

Trivia

This series was produced by Warner Brothers for ABC, and season two, episode two, "The Kookie Caper" had some inside jokes about other series produced by that studio for ABC. Early in episode, Kookie (Edd Byrnes indicated that he doesn't know that Will Hutchins is the star of Sugarfoot (1957). Later, he can be seen reading an issue of TV Guide, with the stars of Maverick (1957), James Garner, and Jack Kelly, on the cover. Both of those shows were produced by Warner Brothers, as was this one.
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The character of Stu Bailey originally appeared in one novel and three short stories written by Series Creator Roy Huggins.
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The building in which the detectives' offices were located was, in real-life, the home of the Mary Webb Davis modelling agency. The front of the building, the Dino's Lodge driveway, and part of Dino's, were reproduced on a Warner Brothers soundstage, which is where most of the scenes that took place in that area were filmed. The doorknob on the real door was on the left, and that's where it was on the mock-up in the earliest episodes. Later, for some reason, they moved the knob on the soundstage version to the right. The Mary Webb Davis office was eventually replaced by the Tiffany Theatre. The building has since been torn down.
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The network handed the creative reigns of the show over to Jack Webb and William Conrad for the show's final season. Webb and Conrad proceeded to fire the entire cast except Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. and re-molded his character Stu Bailey into an international spy.
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The restaurant, Dino's Lodge, was then owned by Dean Martin. Before it was torn down in 1989, it was located at 8524 Sunset (near Alta Loma) in Los Angeles, California.
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Sponsors included Anacin aspirin, Certs breath mints "with the golden drop of Retsyn", and Salem cigarettes.
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The "Dino's Lodge", that featured performances in numerous episodes, often included the Frankie Ortega Trio. The trio were a Los Angeles-based three-piece jazz band signed with Warner Brothers Records, and that often headlined at the real-life Dino's during their heyday of the 1950s and 60s.
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This was the first of Warner Brothers' formulaic detective series. ABC was so impressed with its success, that they ordered three identical series that differed only in their sunny locales: Bourbon Street Beat (1959), Hawaiian Eye (1959) and Surfside Six (1960). A fourth series, The Roaring 20's (1960) added variety, by taking place in another era.
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Even though Dino's Lodge is shown in every episode, Dean Martin, who owned the lodge, was never on the show, nor even mentioned.
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The ownership battle over the rights to this show was the reason that Roy Huggins left Warner Brothers. He'd created the concept behind the series, and Selby was his creation, but the pilot episode was released theatrically, and had not been written by Huggins at all. lt was a Warner Brothers property because the actual writer had been working for hire and had no legal claim to it, and so legal ownership of the show belonged to them.
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The sixth season shows Stuart Bailey's (Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.'s) office in The Bradbury Building, a Los Angeles, California landmark.
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During the last eight episodes of the final season, Bailey had a new secretary (stenographer) named Hannah, played by Joan Staley.
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Stuart Bailey drove a Thunderbird.
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The name of one of the show's directors, George Waggner, is listed in the credits as, "George WaGGner", with the "GG" capitalised. The letter "G" just happens to be the seventh letter of the alphabet, so "GG" = "77". Obviously, I can't say for sure that's the reason for the double capital G's, since WaGGner never gave any explanation for this little oddity. However, I'd like to believe it's because he just couldn't resist creating a little inside joke/hidden riddle for sharp-eyed viewers to solve.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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