77 Sunset Strip (1958) - News Poster

(1958–1964)

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Watch These 10 Films to Fully Appreciate ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’

  • Variety
Watch These 10 Films to Fully Appreciate ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’
To fully appreciate some of the allusions and inspirations that propel Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” you should consider doing some homework — or streaming some other movies.

Of course, you don’t have to be familiar with any of the following titles to enjoy Tarantino’s 1969-set fact-and-fiction mashup about Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio), an actor flailing in professional limbo after the cancellation of his TV Western “Bounty Law”; Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt), Dalton’s long-time stunt double and close confidant; and Sharon Tate (Margot Robbie), a rising star and Dalton’s next-door neighbor. But you can enhance your enjoyment by having some knowledge of the stories behind the story.

The Bandit” (2016)

Jesse Moss’ entertaining and insightful documentary is putatively about the making of 1977’s “Smokey and the Bandit,” but more interestingly concerned with the personal and professional bonds between superstar Burt Reynolds and stuntman-turned-filmmaker Hal Needham.
See full article at Variety »

Andrew McCullough, Who Directed Orson Welles and James Dean on Television, Dies at 94

Andrew McCullough, Who Directed Orson Welles and James Dean on Television, Dies at 94
Andrew McCullough, a prolific director in TV's Golden Age who worked with Orson Welles and James Dean on the small screen and called the shots for The Donna Reed Show and Family Ties, died Jan. 22 in Los Angeles, his family announced. He was 94.

McCullough also helmed episodes of Leave It to Beaver, 77 Sunset Strip, The Fugitive, Maverick, Lassie and Hawaiian Eye and later served as an Ad on Happy Days.

Welles, who had already conquered film (Citizen Kane), theater (Caesar) and radio (Mercury Theater on the Air, War of the Worlds), in 1953 made his television debut in a live adaptation of King Lear. The Shakespeare classic was ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

The Law Is A Ass #438: Stu Went Looking For The Old Bailey

  • Comicmix
TV or, not TV, that is the question. The answer is TV.

I know, I’ve spent the past five columns writing about a TV show and not comic books, and also four out of the five columns before that doing the same. But sometimes these TV shows are just asking for it.

Like “By His Own Verdict,” the November 15, 1963 episode of 77 Sunset Strip. Okay, most of us weren’t even born when this episode first aired. And those of us who were – like, gulp, me – couldn’t shave yet. But the law involved in the story hasn’t changed in the almost fifty-five years since the episode aired. In fact, it’s been the law since 1910, which is before all of us were born. So the topic is still topical, even if it’s not timely.

Joseph Cotton played Arnold Buhler, a criminal defense attorney who was about to retire.
See full article at Comicmix »

William Phipps, Sci Fi Actor and Original Voice of Prince Charming, Dies at 96

  • Variety
William Phipps, Sci Fi Actor and Original Voice of Prince Charming, Dies at 96
Character actor William Phipps, who starred in sci fi films of the 1950s and voiced Prince Charming in 1950’s “Cinderella,” died Friday, June 1 at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 96.

Phipps’ friend and entertainment industry author Tom Weaver announced the news, adding that Phipps had been battling lung cancer, which was complicated by pneumonia.

Phipps was born in Vincennes, Ind., on Feb. 4, 1922. In 1939, he enrolled at Eastern Illinois University in Charleston, Ill., where he studied accounting and planned to pursue it as a career while continuing what was then an acting hobby on the side.

In 1941, Phipps decided to forgo his Eiu studies and moved to California to pursue his acting dream. He later enlisted in the Navy after his brother Jack was shot down over the South Pacific, serving as a radioman aboard six ships between 1942 and 1945. After his discharge, he returned to Hollywood and used the G.
See full article at Variety »

William Phipps Dies: Voice Of Prince Charming In ‘Cinderella’ Was 96

William Phipps Dies: Voice Of Prince Charming In ‘Cinderella’ Was 96
William Phipps, the voice of Prince Charming in the animated Disney film Cinderella and a prolific actor who appeared in more than 200 film and television productions, has died. Phipps passed Friday at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica at age 96 from lung cancer complications, according to his friend, author Tom Weaver.

Phipps had an interesting career in film, debuting in the Oscar-nominated Crossfire, which was a Best Picture candidate that year. But he was best known for his many roles in 1950s science fiction films, where he was one of the genre’s main players.

Among his appearances were the films Five, The War of the Worlds, Invaders From Mars, Cat Women of the Moon, and The Snow Creature.

Phipps voice-over gig as Prince Charming was a direct hire by Walt Disney himself. It brought Phipps a whopping $100 for an afternoon’s work. He later made a live appearance as
See full article at Deadline »

Clint Walker, Star of TV Western ‘Cheyenne,’ Dies at 90

  • Variety
Clint Walker, Star of TV Western ‘Cheyenne,’ Dies at 90
Clint Walker, who starred in the television Western “Cheyenne” and had a key supporting role in the WWII film “The Dirty Dozen,” died on Monday in Northern California, according to the New York Times. He was 90.

For seven seasons from 1955-61, he played Cheyenne Bodie, a rambunctious wanderer in the post-Civil War West, on the ABC series “Cheyenne.” (He also guested as the character on “Maverick.”)

The actor’s seriocomic confrontation with star Lee Marvin was one of the highlights of the classic 1967 war picture “The Dirty Dozen.”

After “Cheyenne” ended, Walker made some guest appearances on TV — “77 Sunset Strip,” “Kraft Suspense Theatre” and “The Lucy Show,” in an episode called “Lucy and Clint Walker.”

But the actor became more interested in movies both theatrical and for TV. In 1964, he had a supporting role in the Doris Day-Rock Hudson comedy “Send Me No Flowers.” His acting was not distinguished,
See full article at Variety »

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