6.5/10
56
3 user

The Old West (1952)

Doc Lockwood and his gang are trying to take away Autry's contract for supplying horses to the stagecoach line. Parson Brooks joins Autry in an effort to clean up the town of Sadderlock.

Director:

George Archainbaud

Writer:

Gerald Geraghty
Reviews

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Gene Autry ... Gene Autry
Champion ... Champ (as Champion World's Wonder Horse)
Gail Davis ... Arlie Williams
Lyle Talbot ... Doc Lockwood
Louis Jean Heydt ... Jeff Bleeker
House Peters ... Parson Jonathan Brooks (as House Peters Sr.)
House Peters Jr. ... Henchman Mike
Dickie Jones ... Pinto (as Dick Jones)
Kathy Johnson Kathy Johnson ... Judie Bleeker
Pat Buttram ... Panhandle Gibbs
Edit

Storyline

Doc Lockwood and his gang are trying to take away Autry's contract for supplying horses to the stagecoach line. Parson Brooks joins Autry in an effort to clean up the town of Sadderlock. Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Gene makes a beachhead for a parson in the town that forgot GOD! (original print ad) See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

15 January 1952 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Gene Autry Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Soundtracks

Music By the Angels
Sung by Gene Autry
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Oh My Gosh, Gene Gets Shot
4 February 2015 | by dougdoepkeSee all my reviews

Gene's clearly trying new movie mixes as TV's co-axial cable crosses the continent in 1952, bringing service to the entire nation. In The Old West there's not as much music, while what comedy there is is non-buffoonish. In fact, Pat Buttram is far down the cast list in what looks like a cut-back, at least in terms of screen time. Then too, leading lady Davis has little to do but stand around and look pretty. At the same time, boyish Dick Jones plays a henchman, though not an irredeemable one. And catch little Judie (Johnson) who's got a fairly big role, as if girls might be joining boys among Gene's Front Row kids. Good to see that fine utility actor Louis-Jean Heydt getting an unusual role and hopefully a big payday.

Anyhow the story's got some surprises, among which Gene gets badly shot—good thing he heals quickly. Otherwise, who would we root for among all those flying fists. There's lots of action as Gene competes with sneaky Doc Lockwood (Talbot) to get the contract for stagecoach horses. Autry thinks mustangs will work better than broke ones, so they have a thundering stage race. And catch those impressive wild horse herds.

All in all, it's an action-filled hour with Gene and a performing Champion who gets to show us his many four-legged tricks.

A "7" on the Matinée Scale

(In Passing-- Can't help noticing the unusual religious overlay with the parson {Peters Sr.} and the gospel hymn that gets repeated into a big production number. Judging from the release date, Jan. 1952, I expect the programmer was produced at the height of the Korean War, when patriotic feelings were uppermost. Nothing hangs on this— just a surmise, since I don't recall anything like the over-lay before, though I could be mistaken.)


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 3 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed