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Moulin Rouge (1952)

Not Rated | | Biography, Drama, Music | 10 April 1953 (Brazil)
Fictional account of French artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

Director:

John Huston

Writers:

Pierre La Mure (novel), Anthony Veiller (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Won 2 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
José Ferrer ... Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec / Comte Alphonse de Toulouse-Lautrec
Zsa Zsa Gabor ... Jane Avril
Suzanne Flon ... Myriamme Hayam
Claude Nollier Claude Nollier ... Countess Adèle de Toulouse-Lautrec
Katherine Kath Katherine Kath ... Louise Weber aka La Goulue
Muriel Smith ... Aicha / Singing Voice of Jane Avril
Mary Clare ... Madame Loubet
Walter Crisham ... Valentin le Desossé
Harold Kasket Harold Kasket ... Charles Zidler
Georges Lannes ... Sgt. Balthazar Patou
Lee Montague ... Maurice Joyant
Maureen Swanson ... Denise de Frontiac
Tutte Lemkow ... Aicha's Partner
Jill Bennett ... Sarah
Theodore Bikel ... King Milo IV of Serbia
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Storyline

A fictionalized account of the latter part of the life of French artist Henri de Toulouse Lautrec (1864-1901) is presented, he who is arguably most renowned professionally for immortalizing the characters of the Paris can-can dance hall, the Moulin Rouge, on canvas. This phase of his story begins in 1890. Born into aristocracy, Toulouse-Lautrec moves to Paris to pursue his art as he hangs out at the Moulin Rouge where he feels like he fits in being a misfit among other misfits. His misfit status is due to his diminutive physical stature, his legs which were broken and stopped growing following a childhood fall down some stairs. Because of the way he looks, he believes he is never destined to experience the true love of a woman. That lack of love in his life may change as he meets two women. The first is prostitute Marie Charlet, who he saves from imprisonment in a white knight act. Their relationship ends up being a turbulent one, the downs where each feels the need to hurt the other ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The most startling and daring love story ever told! See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

10 April 1953 (Brazil) See more »

Also Known As:

John Huston's Production Moulin Rouge See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,500,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$3,188
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Color:

Color (Colour by) (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Director John Huston only finished the final edit a few hours before the December premiere to qualify it for Academy Award consideration. See more »

Goofs

When Henri Lautrec arrives at the gallery for the showing of his pictures, as he 'walks' in, his shadow on the ground clearly shows Jose Ferrer's legs tucked behind him as he walks (on his knees). See more »

Quotes

Myriamme Hayam: Won't you come in?
Henri: Not tonight, Myriamme. I have another engagement.
Myriamme Hayam: Oh. Where does one go at this hour?
Henri: Some of the fountains at which I drink flow ceaselessly.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: His pallette is caked, his brushes are dry, yet the genius of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec is as fresh and alive as the day he laid them down.

Here for a brief moment, they shall be restored to his hands, and he and his beloved city and his time shall live again.

PARIS 1890 See more »

Connections

Referenced in On the Up: Meeting Jane Webster (1991) See more »

Soundtracks

It's April Again
(Moulin Rouge)
Music by Georges Auric
French lyrics by Jacques Larue
English lyrics by William Engvick
Performed by Zsa Zsa Gabor
See more »

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User Reviews

 
The Most Beautiful Ghost Story Ever Filmed?
31 August 2005 | by HoldjerhorsesSee all my reviews

Certainly one of the most beautiful ghost stories filmed in Technicolor ("The Innocents," with Deborah Kerr, perhaps takes the prize for black and white.) "Moulin Rouge" the film is itself the ghost of Lautrec's life and art. An almost minimalist script (minimalist writing being as daring for mainstream Hollywood in 1952 as the Can-Can was for fin de siecle Paris) supports and moves us through the exhilarating three-dimensional world of Lautrec's paintings come to life.

Meticulous production design, set decoration and even costumes were created by Marcel Vertes (whose hands can be seen sketching for Jose Ferrer in closeup). Schiaparelli designed Zsa Zsa Gabor's costumes. Oswald Morris lit and photographed the sumptuous sets. The synthesis of these artists miraculously captures the essence of Lautrec's art -- yet still is but a ghost of his "real" world and life.

Each scene plays like one of Lautrec's sketches or paintings: not an extraneous line or element . . . seemingly simple and obvious, yet rich and deep and true. The artful script is credited to Anthony Veiller and John Huston from Pierre La Mure's novel (a ghost of a life in words alone).

Collette Marchand as the prostitute, Marie Charlet, with whom Lautrec falls in love, gives one of the most indelible and convincing performances ever captured -- almost as if Huston had found a turn-of-the-century French "child of the gutters" who happened to be a brilliant actress, instead of vice versa. Tempestuous, vulnerable, enchanting, exasperating, transparent -- Marie is a phantom of love; not the real thing. A poor uneducated child adopting the guise of the only kind of "woman" she knows. Ultimately a sham. A pretend woman. Self-destructive and destroying. Offering the only thing she knows: not real love.

Jose Ferrer beautifully underplays Lautrec and keeps his inner pain to a barely repressed minimum, except for brief, sardonic, telling outbursts. He is, after all, almost continually anesthetized by cognac and absinthe. Not once, as the artist or the actor, does Ferrer seek our pity or sympathy. His Lautrec is a ghost of a man, haunting the fringes of the demi-monde, then, after his success as an artist, able to connect with others only superficially -- until it's too late and he loses the genuine love of Miriamme (Suzanne Flon) because he can't see it. She too is a kind of ghost.

On his deathbed, in Huston's vision, Lautrec is visited by the dance hall ghosts of his beloved Moulin Rouge, the legendary club that still exists in Paris, in a surprisingly moving finale.

Zsa Zsa Gabor looks, on first glance, impossibly beautiful. Turns out she's just impossible: she can't act, can't lip-synch, can't simulate dancing, can't even move gracefully. Though carefully costumed, for the most part, the unfortunate "serpentine" gown Schiaparelli designed for Gabor's second number as Jane Avril reveals hips already as wide as a barn. (These used to be called "child-bearing hips." Though Gabor may seem silly as a Hollywood personality, she was smart enough to marry Conrad Hilton and give him a daughter, Francesca, thus assuring her financial well-being in perpetuity. And she and her "franchise," such as it is, have outlived everybody else connected with this production.) Miss Gabor's singing voice is dubbed by Muriel Smith, the first black opera singer to perform Carmen at Covent Garden. She appears in "Moulin Rouge" as the black Can-Can dancer, dancing up a storm and leaping into catfights at the drop of a petticoat.

George Auric's atmospheric score is also a triumph of mood and character: what Lautrec might have written himself were he a composer.

Nothing, really, is as it appears in "Moulin Rouge." It's not "really" Lautrec's story, but "impressions" of it. The production design, sets and costumes aren't "really" Lautrec in three dimensions, but shadows of his soul and world. Inordinately tall actor Jose Ferrar portrays the 5'1" Lautrec. Hungarian courtesan Zsa Zsa Gabor (birth nose fortunately cosmetically altered while a teenager) portrays French chanteuse Jane Avril -- with vocals provided by a black American opera singer who relocated to London. Some of the accents are real, most are not. Two French bit parts are played by Christopher Lee (uncredited) and Peter Cushing, Britishers who would go on to revolutionize horror movies in the '60's with their Hammer Film shockers. Even artist Marcel Vertes, so responsible for the look of "Moulin Rouge" actually began his career as a forger of Lautrec works.

Yet if nothing is "real" here, one finally must ask if the ghosts and demons that haunt us all, to some degree, as they do Lautrec and everyone else in this film, aren't "real" after all.


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