The Cat Concerto (1947) Poster

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9/10
Amazing Concert Under Duress & A Deserved Oscar Winner
ccthemovieman-119 December 2006
Tom, complete with a tuxedo, is a pianist performing a concerto (Hungarian Rhapsody #2) for the audience. Things are going well until Jerry, peacefully asleep inside the piano, is rudely woken up.

The rest of the cartoon slows various ways these two guys torment each other. The amazing thing was that no matter what happened, the concerto kept on going and sounded great. In fact, you could probably turn your head away from the television and just enjoy the concert!

Unlike most of the stories, this one revolved just around one object (a piano) but the sight gags were all good and the more I think about it, extremely clever and I can see how it won an Oscar.
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10/10
pure magic
movieman_kev31 May 2005
Tom is playing Hungarian Rhapsody #2 for an audience, but when he wakes up Jerry, he must maintain his perfect piano playing abilities while contending with the mouse. I know there was a controversy between this short and the WB's Looney Tune short "Rhapsody Rabbit" (which is a funny short as well and the similarities are a lot), but I feel that this Tom and Jerry short is the clear winner. It is damn near pitch perfect and one of the best Tom and jerry cartoon shorts of all time. And rightfully so. The classic tune meets classic animation. This award winning cartoon can be found on disc one of the Spotlight collection DVD of "Tom & Jerry"

My Grade: A+
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10/10
An excellent mix of classical music and animation-and a good Tom and Jerry cartoon as well!
llltdesq17 April 2001
Cartoon studios have been blending animation with music probably since the start of animation. Particularly classical and also jazz. Every major studio has done at least a few cartoons where the animation is done to the beat of the music. This is one of the best of the MGM efforts. One of the few times when my sympathies have been with Tom more than with Jerry. While Rhapsody With Rivets is the best short to blend classical with animation (Sliphorn King of Polaroo was tops for jazz!), this cartoon, with several other Tom and Jerry shorts, does very well indeed and won an Oscar. Highly recommended.
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8/10
note perfect performance
awblundell10 July 2002
Tom flawlessly performs a Liszt piano concerto despite simultaneously engaging in the usual Tom and Jerry antics.

Lifted above the usual high standard of the Fred Quimby produced series by the flawless melding of action and music
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Every one of the 10,000 cells is a gem
Peter Morris29 May 2004
Warning: Spoilers
* Spoiler warning - you may do yourself harm watching this cartoon *

I have been doing a complete analysis of The Cat Concerto as part of my PhD work and I have spent 100 hours on it. You may think me mad but I still burst out laughing when I see one of the single frames as I step through them.

Scott Bradley's arrangement of Liszt's 2nd Hungarian Rhapsody (piano duet, played by Bradley and John Crown, head of Piano at University of Southern California) makes an excellent canvas for Muse, Barge & Spence to animate. There are more comic gems in this 7 minute cartoon than all the latter-day comedy features put together.

Truly wonderful. If you get the chance to watch the cartoon frame by frame on a computer, do so, but I disclaim any responsibility for asphyxia or self-harm from rolling on the floor.

Top marks.
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10/10
I love this cartoon
TEXICAN-227 July 2002
Having studied piano for years, I can really appreciate the effort to make it look like Tom is really playing this piece, and the wonderful effort to make the action fit the music only adds to the enjoyment. Perfect 10.
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8/10
Encore!
CuriosityKilledShawn27 March 2007
In a departure from the usual household mayhem, Tom stars as a classical concert pianist. Dressed in a tailcoat and hammering out Hungarian Rhapsody Number 2 (which you might recognize as the tune played by Daffy and Donald in Who Framed Roger Rabbit) he is bothered by Jerry, who just happens to live inside the piano.

Cue loads of tricks played on poor Tom, who is desperately managing to stay in tune as Jerry runs amok. This cartoon actually won an Academy Award back in the day and it's easy to see why. The editing and timing are dead on, as is the imagination. A lot of laughs to be had here and one of the best Tom and Jerry shorts.
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The greatest cartoon masterpiece
vivian_baum_cabral20 January 2002
I'm 20 years old and I'm still crazy for "Tom And Jerry".This is not just a "Tom And Jerry"cartoon,this is the greatest cartton ever made.All cartoonist should see this classic to learn how to create a great cartoon.Everithing is at his best:the music,the settings and of course there is Tom.Is impossible you don't fall in love with Tom.If I had to rate this cartoon 1-10,I certanly would give 10000.
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10/10
Simply one of the best cartoons ever
mzimmer15 March 2000
This is a wonderful wedding of music and cartoon action, brought off flawlessly with panache and great slapstick humor. The scissors gag alone is enough to put this one in the hall of fame. This short very much deserved the Oscar it won; it ranks among the best cartoons ever made, bar none.
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Quite simply the greatest cartoon in history!
Alex O11 May 2003
It doesn't matter how many times you see it, it will still bring tears of laughter to the eyes!

A perfect blend of classical music and the chaos that only Jerry Mouse could ever wreak on Tom's efforts as a classical pianist...

The only other cartoon that comes close is Bugs Bunny's "What's Opera, Doc?"

Cat Concerto is simply, the funiest, greatest, best cartoon ever made.

Enjoy!! Over, and over and over again!
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10/10
Eight minutes of musical magic!
TheLittleSongbird4 May 2010
This has to be one of my all time favourite Tom and Jerry cartoons. First of all the music is absolutely outstanding and is incorporated really well into the story, which is simple but very effective. The animation is also of true beauty, this is probably one of the better looking Tom and Jerry cartoons or so in my opinion. The sight gags are wonderful, extremely clever and put to perfect use. And Tom and Jerry are both great here, Tom flawlessly performs Lizst's Hungarian Rhapsody Number 2, something I hear a lot in cartoons, while tormenting Jerry(and vice versa) in the process, while Jerry serves as a perfect and somewhat cute foil for him. Overall, if you love Tom and Jerry and classical music this is a must see! 10/10 Bethany Cox
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10/10
Scott Bradley's finest hour
Popeye-812 September 2000
A dazzling film, mostly due to the significant talents of Scott Bradley, MGM's woefully under-appreciated musical director for their animation unit. He's the one playing the piano in this marvelous epic, which unifies music and animation flawlessly. The one example that may prove Bradley superior to Warner's musical genius, Carl Stalling.
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7/10
I guess I'm a Neanderthal...
MartinHafer2 September 2009
I have a confession to make. Although the "sophisticated" cartoons with Tom and Jerry as well as Bugs Bunny are among the highest rated on IMDb, I don't particularly like them. By sophisticated, I mean these are high-brow cartoons where the characters step out of character and perform to classical music or opera. Films like WHAT'S OPERA, DOC? and THE CAT CONCERTO are prime examples of this. Sure, I like the music well enough (especially the non-opera) but I prefer to see them doing what they do best--shoving sticks of dynamite in each others' ears and dropping anvils on each others' heads! But, apparently I am a Neanderthal, as this particular short has a huge rating of 8.5 and won the Oscar for Best Animated Short.

However, on my behalf I should point out two particular reasons why I am not a fan of this film. First, kids usually hate them. I did when I was little and so did all my friends, so they do not have universal appeal. Second, read the IMDb trivia section about this particular cartoon. CAT CONCERTO may have been plagiarized or at least "inspired" by a nearly identical film by Warner Brothers just a year earlier--yet this later film is given an Oscar. This hardly seems fair.

Overall, this cartoon has very nice animation but that is about all. Just my two cents worth from an animation Neanderthal.
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8/10
Piano Shots Are Very Good
Hitchcoc1 January 2016
I remember how disappointed my friends and I were when the cartoon before the feature film was "Tom and Jerry." I still don't find them funny. Every plot was pretty much the same with Jerry eventually coming out on top (cat prejudice). This one is good because it relies on wonderful animation, especially where Tom is playing Liszt's Second "Hungarian Rhapsody." He has every right to be left alone but for that damned mouse. The closeup of Tom's playing are right on. It makes one wonder how it was done. The point/counterpoint of shenanigans is very clever, syncing with the music beautifully. I think that most kids of my generation know what classical music they do from these cartoon efforts. Nice work.
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10/10
One flustered cat, one persistent and highly inventive mouse and of course one grand piano equals one truly great classic landmark in cartoon history!
Foreverisacastironmess12330 September 2014
I love this one to bits, I really don't see how anybody with even the slightest appreciation of the characters ever could not t, as it's undeniably the gosh-darned Citizen Kane of all Tom and Jerry adventures! Even though there are others I enjoy just as much, I still really can't in all honesty deny that this is probably the very greatest example of this legendary duo's particular brand of magic, and maybe even what they're best remembered for. You might think that it'd be somewhat limited by the confines of the setting simply, being a piano and its two players, but it actually has a feel to it that's rather immense! I love its pitch-perfect pacing, how it begins small and gradually builds as the choreography of the action flows along with the music till by the end it becomes something so epically artful in its madcap grandeur and a real animated tour-de-force that is such greatness to watch! I love all the gags that they managed to come up with out of just the piano keys - or the things on the underside of the keys, they did a spanking key, golf club key, even a bucking bronco key! I think what could have made the ending of it even better for me would have been if instead of the crowd only cheering for Jerry, they were cheering for them both and then the still furious Tom would have heard the applause and been happy that Jerry inadvertently ended up giving him a helping hand and then they'd both take a well-earned bow. The musical score gives things a real extra passion as well as a touch of class. And the way everything that occurs goes together so incredibly well with that music is so charming and funny and it makes me think that there's just no possible way they could've ever found another tune that would have matched the hi-jinx of those two so perfectly. So bravisimo indeed, they gave their best performance ever!!! 🌟
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10/10
One of the most iconic Tom & Jerry shorts ever made.
TheOneManBoxOffice31 August 2014
Warning: Spoilers
In 1847, famous composer Franz Liszt wrote Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2 (henceforth called Number 2), which is considered today as one of the most iconic pieces of classical music ever written. Though made to be a dramatic piece, it has had a place in the world of comedy, mainly in animated shorts and feature productions. The first use of the tune in film came from the 1929 Disney short "The Opry House", and this started a trend with other studios on making comedic interpretations of the tune performed by cartoon characters. One of the most iconic, and most memorable uses of this concept is found here.

Tom & Jerry, at this point, have become household names in the motion picture industry as one of the greatest duos ever conceived. For MGM, the Tom & Jerry shorts have become just as memorable for their craftsmanship, writing, and execution as their now classic movie musicals like "Singin' in the Rain" or "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers". However, this short takes a different turn from the usual house setting. Instead, it takes place in a concert hall, most likely the famous Hollywood Bowl.

Tom is a concert pianist who arrives on stage to perform Liszt's Number 2 on the grand piano in front of a massive audience. When he begins to play, everything is going fine, until we look inside the piano and we find that Jerry has made himself a small abode. Of course, he is waken up, though he doesn't get angry about it when he finds out who's at the keys. So he decides to have a bit of fun by making Tom's big night something he wishes never happened. Plus, it serves as a lesson for all piano owners: make sure there's no mice inside to ruin your session, 'cause then you're gonna have a bad time, and no one wants to have a bad time.

What makes this short work to its advantage is how it slowly builds up the slapstick as the tune goes on, and as it goes into the second half of the short, it starts to get more hectic, with the orchestra joining in. At first, Jerry does things to the piano that just irritates and distracts Tom, but when the tempo begins to rise, Jerry decides to make Tom's night a living hell by pushing him towards exhaustion, as if the last straw was finally drawn. In the end, as usual, Jerry gets the last laugh, as the spotlight shines on him and he takes a bow for the performance instead of Tom. Now THAT is a sign of satisfaction.

This is one of the Tom & Jerry shorts that has gotten such high praise from critics and audiences as a comedy classic, it became one of seven Tom & Jerry shorts to win an Academy Award for Best Short Subject in the Cartoon category, which was accepted by the film's producer, Fred Quimby. However, the film also met a moment of controversy. Right after the film was released, Warner Brothers released the Bugs Bunny cartoon "Rhapsody Rabbit", in which Bugs also plays Number Two on the grand piano in front of an audience, with the only difference being that he does not have an adversary to quarrel with. This led to the filmmakers at MGM and Warner Brothers arguing with each other saying that their film was original, and that they plagiarized each other, when really, it was all coincidental.

As for the film itself, it's one of the greats from the Hanna-Barbera catalog of Tom & Jerry shorts. The animation and timing is well done, and the comedy is as smart as usual. The music, obviously, flows with the on-going havoc, and it fits perfectly, making it one of the best uses of Liszt's classic piece. In fact, I have a feeling that the scene from "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" where Donald Duck and Daffy Duck do dueling pianos in the Ink and Paint Club pretty much pays tribute to this particular short.

In conclusion, this is a gem in the Tom & Jerry franchise, and a step forward for the characters to interact in different environments. As a kid, I looked forward to seeing this film appear on a Tom & Jerry block on Cartoon Network. Though if you're looking to own this film so you can watch it at anytime, it can be found on the first Tom & Jerry Spotlight Collection or Volume 1 of the Tom & Jerry Golden Collection.
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10/10
A classic Tom and Jerry short
Tweekums19 September 2012
Warning: Spoilers
This short sees Tom taking to the stage as a concert pianist to play Hungarian Rhapsody #2 by Franz Liszt; it starts well but Jerry has made his bed on the hammers and as soon as Tom hits the low notes Jerry it sent along the length hammers and woken. He gets out to watch Tom play but rather than ignore him Tom pushes him between the hammers before vigorously playing those notes. From then on Jerry tries to disrupt his playing as Tom struggles valiantly to play on… and when the piece finally comes to the end Jerry decides to keep going.

This is one of the best Tom and Jerry shorts; it is not surprising that it picked up the Academy Award. The usual violence is toned down but by no means eliminated; we still see Tom put his finger on a mouse trap and Jerry battered by the piano's hammers. What made it so funny was how Tom managed to continue playing and sounding pretty good, despite Jerry's efforts; of course by the end it is Jerry who is getting the applause! The animation looks great; I'm no pianist but it does look as though Tom is striking the right notes rather than just moving his hands to the music… clearly animators took things more seriously back then! If you like classic animation this one is a must see.
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8/10
This animated classic never misses a beat
ackstasis7 October 2007
'The Cat Concerto,' a 1947 MGM "Tom and Jerry" cartoon, is one hundred percent class. In this episode, Tom is a professional piano player, and he emerges before a respectful audience to perform "Hungarian Rhapsody Number 2" by Franz Liszt. However, Tom's piano-playing rudely disrupts Jerry, who was sleeping peacefully inside the musical instrument. In return for this inconvenience, the small mouse decides to inflict revenge upon the cat, who, playing feverishly at the piano, is currently at his most vulnerable. 'The Cat Concerto' is, interestingly, the first and only "Tom and Jerry" cartoon that I can remember seeing, and it certainly stacks up very well against some of the "Silly Symphonies" and "Merry Melodies" that I've also been watching recently. The cartoon goes for just eight minutes, and, despite the complete absence of any dialogue, it carries a tremendous amount of energy. The action never becomes monotonous, and we can only watch with excitement to see if the frantic pianist, despite Jerry's interruptions, can maintain his composure until the end of the song.

Following its release on April 26 1947, 'The Cat Concerto' met with a spate of controversy, when Warner Brothers accused MGM of plagiarism, citing incredible similarities between it and 'Rhapsody Rabbit (1946).' In the latter film, Bug Bunny sits at a piano, plays Liszt's "2nd Hungarian Rhapsody" and is bothered by an unnamed mouse. Nevertheless, 'The Cat Concerto' remains one of the most beloved of all "Tom and Jerry" cartoons, also scooping up the 1947 Oscar for Best Animated Short. The film's main asset is its incredible simplicity; directors Joseph Barbera and William Hanna have taken a basic idea (wherever that idea might have come from), and have turned it into something both classy and fun. I didn't find that there were really any huge laugh-out-loud moments, but the entire eight minutes was extremely entertaining, and certainly not a bad way to spend my time.

After each character receives their own share of bruising and batterings – with the performance never missing a beat – Jerry eventually gains control over the piano, while an exhausted Tom tries admirably to give the appearance that he is still playing. As the rhapsody comes to a close, and is met with rousing applause, a beaten Tom slumps onto the piano keys, and Jerry climbs onto the top of the instrument to accept all the credit. This is a satisfying ending to the film: we certainly respect Tom for the commendable effort he put into the heartfelt performance, but we always wanted the little mouse to win.
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9/10
Bravo! Encore!
BA_Harrison21 June 2008
An academy award winning adventure for Tom and Jerry, The Cat Concerto is an excellent example of a simple idea, perfectly executed.

Tom is giving a piano recital, which wakes Jerry the mouse, who happens to be sleeping on top of the piano's hammers. Miffed at having his sleep disturbed by the maestro moggy's tinkling, Jerry attempts to sabotage the performance.

An almost perfect blend of classical music, excellent animation, and visual comedy, The Cat Concerto is one of the finest Tom and Jerry cartoons of all time—and considering that the guys have been scrapping for more than sixty years in over 170 animated adventures, that's saying something!
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4/10
Who's the real maestro?
Horst_In_Translation13 August 2015
Warning: Spoilers
Cartoons with music have always been a big hit back in the day, be it in terms of Warner Bros', Disney or Hanna Barbera in this one here. These 7 minutes are possibly the most famous Tom&Jerry cartoon. Fittingly, it also won the Academy Award that year. However, I must say, I was a bit underwhelmed with this one. Tom sure looked handsome, the piano was nicely animated and the music was pretty good, but in terms of the story and comedic scenes I hoped for more. Jerry just wants to sleep early on, then swing to Tom's play, but Tom quickly gets annoyed by the presence of the little mouse and gives it his all to chase him away. He has more moments when it looks like he may succeed than in many other T&J cartoons, but in the end, there can, of course, only be one winner. Not a winner for me though. I have seen many superior short films including the world's most famous cat-and-mouse duo. Not recommended.
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6/10
This alleged Oscar "winner" . . .
oscaralbert26 March 2017
Warning: Spoilers
. . . just goes to show that Rigged Elections were common in America well before LA LA LAND and Hillary got hosed. You can go right now into Wikipedia's annual listing for Looney Tunes and quickly pick out a dozen that stood head and shoulders above this lame Tom & Jerry outing the year it stole the gelded statuette. Warner Bros. put a full symphony orchestra at the disposal of animated shorts composer extraordinaire Carl W. Stalling, and such musical delights as RHAPSODY IN RIVETS and WHAT'S OPERA, DOC? were the result. THE CAT CONCERTO features some listless Liszt, along with a mediocre smattering of this and that. To make matters worse, the title critter--a feline unimaginatively dubbed "Tom"--stands mute throughout, unable to even rip off a single one of Sylvester Cat's "Suffering Succotash!" catch phrases. But the Racist Election Riggers don't give a hoot about the quality of their candidates--whether MOONLIGHT, Rump, GONE WITH THE WIND, or THE CAT CONCERTO--once their "fix" is in. No wonder Colin Kaepernick kneels during songs about "the Land of the Free."
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8/10
Bravo!
Pjtaylor-96-13804413 August 2019
'The Cat Concerto (1947)' is an Oscar-winning short which sees Tom as a classical pianist and Jerry sleeping inside his on-stage piano. What follows is an energetic, musically-timed version of the classic cat-and-mouse stuff we've all some to know and love. The piece feels fresh thanks to its inventive, care-free central conceit and it doesn't overstretch its narrative. The animation is, essentially, as impressive as ever. Tom is seen hitting, basically, every key in time with the music, which is actually an amazing feat in and of itself. Of course, it's not long before we're treated to some silly, slightly absurdist sight-gags, but the initially straight-forward stuff is - rather unexpectedly - almost as visually satisfying. The way in which the music evolves with the narrative is pleasing, too; 'Tom and Jerry' shorts have always benefited from fantastic musical accompaniments, but the marriage between audio and visual feels even more tangible here. Overall, the film is fun, funny and brilliantly accomplished. It's a great time. 8/10
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All The Possible Right Notes.
Arth_Joshi15 May 2019
Tom And Jerry

Warner Brothers is on a whole new level after these short films hits the screen. With William Hanna and Joseph Barbera creating this love story of universal language, these faces are one of those rare comedy classics, that it belittles other commercial or any sort of success in contrast to its excellence. Depicting such an intimate relationship between two rivals, who would have assumed that it would draw laughs with witty sketchy comic sequences like never encountered before. It always is risky to offer such a premise to kids that is practically based upon food cycle and still be entertaining.

It proves the ingenuity of the creators and how they managed to walk on such a fine line and still be adored perpetually by coming generations over almost a century now- Coco, the Oscar winning animated feature, too had similar idea. The creators of the show brought a newer perspective in this animation and kept it smart on expressing the emotions through various activities as the lead characters often did not communicate verbally. Even though the series is based on the rivalry, the soft spot that they have for each other is what made it so special and everlasting.

The political references that these character whips you with is not only smart but thought provoking. Another head spinning nuanced trick of the series is how maturely they exaggerate the physical acts and how much logic actually goes in there, to tease each other or subsequently play their hand with a winning move. Among multiple other supporting characters barging in, every now and then. Spike- the bulldog, soars above all with high stakes and equally simple gags. Tom And Jerry defines the excellence of animated world, nay our pragmatic world, as it explores the deepest emotion and communicates with the viewers fluently that does not bar any age.

The Cat Concerto

To make it authentic since the beginning, the creators make Tom adjust the seat, dry its hands and check the notes in the piano, it shows how meticulous their vision, where they are going to follow all the necessary procedures. Jerry getting tired by using scissors in order to cut Tom's finger which is then punched back by it in the form of revenge as it too tires Tom out in the last scenario, using its own powers against it, a wise move.
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7/10
A cat concerto like no other...
Doylenf12 February 2008
You'll never listen to Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2 again without thinking of this classic MGM cartoon with Tom in concert mode performing at the Hollywood Bowl in formal attire while Jerry is asleep inside the piano. That is, until the performance begins. Then, as the music becomes more and more vigorous, Jerry adds his own special touch to the performance, much to the exasperation of Tom.

Although the two of them are sparring throughout, they never miss a note of music--which is the real bonus for music lovers who may wish to just sit back and listen to the music without visuals.

Enormously clever and deserving of the Oscar it won in 1947. It's the sort of cartoon that reminds us all of how beautifully the Disney people used music in all of their full-length features, probably an encouragement for the Hanna Barbera people to use it for so many of their cartoon classics.
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