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Rip Torn Dies: ‘Larry Sanders Show’ Emmy Winner & Broadway Veteran Was 88

  • Deadline
Rip Torn Dies: ‘Larry Sanders Show’ Emmy Winner & Broadway Veteran Was 88
Rip Torn, who played Garry Shandling’s profane, fiercely loyal producer on HBO’s The Larry Sanders Show, co-starred in the original Men in Black films and was a major star of Broadway and Off Broadway during a seven-decade career, died today surrounded by family at his home in Lakeville, Ct. He was 88.

The prolific Torn played the unstoppable and unflappable Artie on Larry Sanders, which aired from 1992-98 and followed the behind-the-scenes and onstage antics of a successful late-night network talk show. Along with scoring a Supporting Actor in a Comedy Emmy in 1996, he was nominated for each of the show’s six seasons.

The year Torn won his Emmy, he also had been up for Guest Actor in a Drama Series for his turn on CBSChicago Hope. In 2008, he earned his ninth and final Emmy nom, for his recurring role as Don Geiss on NBC’s 30 Rock.
See full article at Deadline »

Fantasia 2017 Review: King Cohen and the Art of the Steal

"Anybody will put up with anything if they think a movie is being shot." These are words of wisdom, but also kind of a guerrilla filmmaking mission statement, from filmmaker Larry Cohen. Steve Mitchell's King Cohen offers a breathless sprint through the writer-director-producer's prolific 'lets just shoot the damn movie!' ethos, from writing for NBC's Kraft Theatre in the era of live television in the late 1950s through episodic shows like The Fugitive and Branded -- "The bulk of the series, Dude" -- in the 1960s to directing racy social commentary (Bone, Black Caesar, God Told Me To, The Private Lives of J. Edgar Hoover) in the 1970s and gonzo genre-mashing creature features in the 1980s (Q: The Winged Serpent, The Stuff), before finally settling with writing mid-tier Hollywood...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

John Williams To Receive 44th AFI Life Achievement Award

©Todd Rosenberg Photography 2009

The American Film Institute (AFI) Board of Trustees announced today that esteemed composer John Williams will be the recipient of the 44th AFI Life Achievement Award, America’s highest honor for a career in film. For the first time in AFI history, the award will be bestowed upon a composer. Williams will be honored at a gala Tribute on June 9, 2016 in Los Angeles, CA.

The AFI Life Achievement Award Tribute special will return for its fourth year with Turner Broadcasting to air on TNT in late June 2016, followed by an encore presentation on its sister network, Turner Classic Movies (TCM).

Most recently, the 43rd AFI Life Achievement Award Tribute brought together the film community to honor Steve Martin.

John Williams has written the soundtrack to our lives,” said Sir Howard Stringer, Chair, AFI Board of Trustees. “Note by note, through chord and chorus, his genius for marrying
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Rip Betsy Palmer Aka Pamela Voorhees of Friday the 13th

Its a nasty blow to not only the horror community but the world. The woman revolutionized the obsessive mother But long before that she thrilled viewers with appearances in such hit shows as Kraft Theatre Studio One in Hollywood and Appointment with Adventure. She also showed her acting chops in flicks like The Last Angry Man It Happened to Jane and The Tin Star.
See full article at Best-Horror-Movies.com »

Friday the 13th actress Betsy Palmer has died at the age of 88

Friday the 13th actress Betsy Palmer has died at the age of 88
Friday the 13th star Betsy Palmer has died at the age of 88.

The actress was best known for her performance as killer cook Mrs Voorhees in the 1980 horror film and its 1981 sequel.

Her manager Brad Lemack informed The AP on Sunday (May 31) that she died of natural causes at a hospice in Connecticut.

In addition to her most famous role, Palmer appeared in TV dramas like Kraft Theatre, Studio One and Murder, She Wrote. She also appeared in The Long Gray Lane, Queen Bee and The Tin Star on the big screen.

Palmer was also known for her Broadway performances, and appeared in several plays during her long career, including Same Time, Next Year and Cactus Flower.

Looking back on Friday the 13th in the years that followed, Palmer was not afraid to share her true feelings about the film, describing the script as a "piece of junk".

The actress
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Actress Betsy Palmer from Friday The 13th Dead at 88

“You see, Jason was my son, and today is his birthday…”

The woman had a long and distinguished career including hundreds of TV appearances in the 1950s and ’60s, but she will always best known as Jason’s mom in the original Friday The 13th (1980). Betsy Palmer was a regular on the horror convention circuit and a good attitude about her place in horror film history. She said in an interview once: “If it was good enough for Boris Karloff, why should I complain?” Betsy Palmer died Friday of natural causes at a hospital in Los Angeles.

From The Associated Press:

Betsy Palmer, the veteran character actress who achieved lasting, though not necessarily sought-after, fame as the murderous camp cook in the cheesy horror film “Friday the 13th,” has died at age 88.

Palmer died Friday of natural causes at a hospice care center in Connecticut, her longtime manager, Brad Lemack,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Inside the Writers’ Room: Post #14: The Revolution is Loading

A few weeks ago HBO and then CBS announced that they would launch stand-alone online services in U.S. in 2015. Before that, Netflix had made known that it would start producing features, crushing theatrical release windows once and for all, after it had contributed to the change of the patterns of attention and the way TV series are made by releasing its House of Cards episodes all at once, as a 13-hour movie. ‘Now the real shakeout begins’, wrote Ted Hope in Hollywood Reporter. ‘We are witnessing the march from once lucrative legacy practices built around titles to a new focus on community.’ Michael Wolff, writing also in the Hollywood Reporter, disagrees: ‘Streaming services from the two networks don’t signal television’s capitulation to Netflix and the web; it’s actually the opposite, as the medium expands yet again to gobble up more revenue.’ And in that sense, he says,
See full article at Hope for Film »

Casting Director Marion Dougherty to Receive Posthumous Emmy

Casting Director Marion Dougherty to Receive Posthumous Emmy
Veteran casting director Marion Dougherty will posthumously receive the 2014 Governors Award from the Television Academy at the Aug. 24 Creative Arts Emmy Awards, the Academy announced on Thursday. Dougherty's pioneering work in the casting industry made her the subject of the 2012 Emmy-nominated documentary “Casting By,” which premiered on HBO. She began serving as a casting director in 1949 with the NBC series “Kraft Television Theatre” and worked on shows that included “Naked City,” “Route 66” and “All in the Family.” Dougherty, who was among the early champions for such actors as Robert Duvall, Warren Beatty and Jack Lemmon, died...
See full article at The Wrap »

All Movie Fans Need to Watch HBO’s ‘Casting By’

One of the best anecdotes in the documentary Casting By, which premieres tonight on HBO, relates the start of Warren Beatty’s screen career on a 1957 episode of Kraft Television Theatre. We’re told that like many young actors of the time he modeled himself way too much on Marlon Brando. Then we actually see a clip, and sure enough the future movie star looks and sounds like he’s doing a comical impersonation. Fortunately, within the next five years he would find his own comfortable style and manage to break out in Hollywood in order to become one of his generation’s finest. And apparently we have casting director Marion Dougherty to thank for giving him his first shot. There are a lot of first- and second-hand stories in the film about a lot of actors and actresses’ beginnings. And a lot of rare clips to prove just how terrible or terrific they really were. There
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Jack Klugman obituary

Actor who won fame as Oscar Madison in The Odd Couple and crimesolving medical examiner Quincy

Television was the medium that conferred stardom on the actor Jack Klugman, who has died aged 90. In a long, distinguished career that also embraced theatre and film, he was principally identified with two television characters: Oscar Madison, the slovenly, down-to-earth, cigar-smoking flatmate of the neurotically neat Felix Unger (Tony Randall) in the long-running comedy series The Odd Couple (1970-75; in the play and film, Felix's surname was spelt Ungar), and Quincy in Quincy, Me (1976-83), a crime-solving medical examiner.

Born in a poor neighbourhood of Philadelphia, the son of Russian-Jewish immigrants, Klugman had a tough childhood. His father, a house painter, died young, forcing his mother to make hats in her kitchen to buy food and clothing for her six children. Young Jack, who worked as a street peddler, later observed: "Poverty can teach lessons that privilege cannot.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jack Klugman obituary

Actor who won fame as Oscar Madison in The Odd Couple and crimesolving medical examiner Quincy

Television was the medium that conferred stardom on the actor Jack Klugman, who has died aged 90. In a long, distinguished career that also embraced theatre and film, he was principally identified with two television characters: Oscar Madison, the slovenly, down-to-earth, cigar-smoking flatmate of the neurotically neat Felix Unger (Tony Randall) in the long-running comedy series The Odd Couple (1970-75; in the play and film, Felix's surname was spelt Ungar), and Quincy in Quincy, Me (1976-83), a crime-solving medical examiner.

Born in a poor neighbourhood of Philadelphia, the son of Russian-Jewish immigrants, Klugman had a tough childhood. His father, a house painter, died young, forcing his mother to make hats in her kitchen to buy food and clothing for her six children. Young Jack, who worked as a street peddler, later observed: "Poverty can teach lessons that privilege cannot.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

'Love Boat' producer Henry Colman dies

'Love Boat' producer Henry Colman dies
Television producer and executive Henry Colman — whose credits include The Love Boat, Hawaii Five-o, and Green Acres — has died at age 89. An announcement Sunday by the Archive of American Television says Colman died Wednesday.

Colman’s career dates to early commercial television, where he started as production coordinator on the musical show Easy Does It. In 1951, Colman became assistant to the director for Kraft Television Theatre and later worked on such series as Robert Montgomery Presents and Colgate Comedy Hour.

As a TV executive, Colman oversaw the pilot of The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis and worked on Green Acres and Hawaii Five-o.
See full article at EW.com - Inside TV »

'Love Boat' Producer, Archivist Henry Colman Dies at 89

  • The Wrap
'Love Boat' Producer, Archivist Henry Colman Dies at 89
Producer Henry Colman, whose resume included the hit TV comedies "The Love Boat" and "Green Acres," has died at the age of 89. Colman passed away from natural causes at his Los Angeles home on Nov. 7. Colman began his career in television just as the medium was coming into its own. After starting as a production coordinator on the local musical show "Easy Does It," he became an assistant to the director on "Kraft Television Theatre" in 1951. He also worked on "Robert Montgomery Presents" and the "Colgate Comedy Hour." Also read:
See full article at The Wrap »

Cinema Retro's Exclusive Interview With Bradford Dillman

  • CinemaRetro
Retro-active: The Best Articles From Cinema Retro's Archives

Bradford Dillman: A Compulsively Watchable Actor

By Harvey Chartrand

In a career that has spanned 43 years, Bradford Dillman accumulated more than 500 film and TV credits. The slim, handsome and patrician Dillman may have been the busiest actor in Hollywood during the late sixties and early seventies, working non-stop for years. In 1971 alone, Dillman starred in seven full-length feature films. And this protean output doesn’t include guest appearances on six TV shows that same year.

Yale-educated Dillman first drew good notices in the early 1950s on the Broadway stage and in live TV shows, such as Climax and Kraft Television Theatre. After making theatrical history playing Edmund Tyrone in the first-ever production of Eugene O’Neill’s Long Day’s Journey into Night in 1956, Dillman landed the role of blueblood psychopath Artie Straus in the crime-and-punishment thriller Compulsion (1959), for which he
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Remember Me: Ben Gazzara

Ben Gazzara died on February 3 of pancreatic cancer. An alumnus of the famed Actors’ Studio, he had a long career on stage, TV, and film. Not just long, but accomplished.

On Broadway, he was the original Brick in the Tennessee Williams’ classic, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and then he eclipsed that triumph with another powerful stage performance as a junkie whose habit poisons his relationship with everyone who loves him in A Hat Full of Rain.

His TV career launched in the early 1950s and extended through the next five decades. His small screen credits included roles on the landmark live drama anthologies of the 50s, such as The United States Steel Hour, Kraft Theatre, and Playhouse 90, and such acclaimed productions as cop drama A Question of Honor (1982), one of network TV’s first attempts to address the then detonating AIDS epidemic in An Early Frost (1985), and the epic mini-series,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Legendary Casting Director Dougherty Dies

  • WENN
Legendary Casting Director Dougherty Dies
The casting director who helped launch the careers of Warren Beatty, James Dean, Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman has passed away.

Marion Dougherty died in New York from natural causes on Sunday. She was 88.

The legendary casting director helped Hollywood abandon its system of stock casting by choosing more individual performers for certain parts.

She started out as an uncredited casting agent for Kraft Television Theatre, and helped start the careers of Dean and Hoffman on TV dramas.

Dougherty moved to Hollywood in the 1970s and later took on a role at Warner Bros. She stayed with the company for three decades and discovered the likes of Glenn Close, Diane Lane, Danny Glover, Matthew McConaughey and Brooke Shields.

Among the legendary films she cast were Escape From Alcatraz, The Killing Fields, Gorillas in the Mist, Batman and the Lethal Weapon series.

Oscar-winning TV legend to guest on 'Hawaii Five-0' -- Exclusive

Oscar-winning TV legend to guest on 'Hawaii Five-0' -- Exclusive
A big wave of stars continue to land on CBS’ Hawaii Five-0. The show has just signed Oscar-winning TV legend Patty Duke to guest star in a season 2 episode.

Duke will play an Alzheimer’s-afflicted mother of a murder victim. When the Five-0 team go to deliver the notification, they learn her condition has her believing that her adult son is actually still a child. For a while, the team shields her from the news, but ultimately she must confront her devastating loss.

According to IMDb, Duke’s first TV series appearance was back in 1957 (Kraft Theatre) which later lead
See full article at EW.com - Inside TV »

Remember Me: Sidney Lumet (1924-2011)

One of the true giants passed away this week: filmmaker Sidney Lumet, dead at 86 of lymphoma.

He was one of an incredibly talented class of directors who graduated from the early days of TV; a group which included such august talents as Arthur Penn (Bonnie and Clyde, 1967), George Roy Hill (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, 1969), John Frankenheimer (The Manchurian Candidate, 1962), Arthur Hiller (The Hospital, 1971), Franklin J. Schaffner (Patton, 1970), Norman Jewison (In the Heat of the Night, 1967), Robert Mulligan (To Kill a Mockingbird, 1962), Martin Ritt (Hud, 1963), and Sam Peckinpah (The Wild Bunch, 1969). Only Jewison is left, now, and as each has passed, mainstream American moviemaking has gotten a little louder, a little emptier, and a little dumber.

TV drama in the early days was almost like good theater: it was usually live, smart, provocative, rich with real-world character and sharp dialogue. Very early on, Lumet was considered one of the
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Charlie’s Angels’ John Forsythe Dies

John Forsythe was a leading actor on stage, screen and television from the late 1940s, but was never seen in one of his best known roles. He lent his distinctive voice to the role of Charles Townsend, who sent an array of lovely agents on various cases by speaker phone in the Charlie’s Angels television series from 1976 to 1981. The Angels originally included Farrah Fawcett, Kate Jackson, and Jaclyn Smith, and were later joined by Cheryl Ladd, Shelley Hack, and Tanya Roberts. He reprised his role for feature film adaptations twenty years later, Charlie’s Angels (2000) and Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle (2003), starring Cameron Diaz, Drew Barrymore, and Lucy Liu as a new generation of beautiful detectives. Forsythe became a silver-haired sex symbol in his sixties, when he starred as ruthless oil tycoon Blake Carrington in the ABC prime-time soap opera Dynasty from 1981 to 1989. He frequently found himself at the
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

Joseph Wiseman – James Bond’s Villainous Dr. No – Dies

Character actor Joseph Wiseman brought to life the first screen villain for British secret agent James Bond when he played Dr. No in the 1962 film of the same name.

Wiseman played the cool and calculating menace in the first of the long-running series of James Bond films, which initially starred Sean Connery as the British secret agent.

Wiseman was born in Montreal, Canada, on May 15, 1918, and moved to the United States with his family as a child. He began his career on stage and made his Broadway debut in the late 1930s.

Wiseman appeared frequently on television throughout his career, with roles in the 1950s anthology series Suspense, Lights Out, Tales of Tomorrow, and Inner Sanctum. He was featured as Death in a 1954 production of Death Takes a Holiday for Kraft Theatre, and was the Sorceror in a 1958 Shirley Temple Storybook adaptation of The Wild Swans. He starred in the
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »
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