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Film Review: ‘Coyote Lake’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘Coyote Lake’
United States-Mexico border politics are such a minefield at present, you have to marvel at the chutzpah — or simple obliviousness — it takes to make something like “Coyote Lake,” which superficially deploys those issues for the purposes of irrelevant, implausible melodrama. After directing several shorts (and years of work as a production assistant on shows such as “The Mindy Project” and “American Crime Story”), Sara Seligman makes her feature debut with a sluggish mix of thriller and drama that lacks the suspense required in one department and the depth needed on the other. Too flat-footedly earnest even to provide inadvertent bad-movie fun, it opens on five theatrical screens (two in Texas) simultaneous with On Demand launch this Friday. Enthusiasm will be scant.

We first meet teenaged Ester (“Riverdale’s” Camila Mendes) and her much-older mother Teresa (Adriana Barraza) as they’re sharing a seemingly innocuous dinner in their isolated farmhouse with an overnight room-renter.
See full article at Variety »

Frank Capra movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘It’s a Wonderful Life,’ ‘It Happened One Night’

  • Gold Derby
Frank Capra movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘It’s a Wonderful Life,’ ‘It Happened One Night’
Frank Capra would’ve celebrated his 122nd birthday on May 18, 2019. The three-time Oscar winner dominated the box office throughout the 1930s with his populist fables, nicknamed “Capra-corn.” Yet how many of these titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, take a look back at 12 of Capra’s greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1897 in Siciliy, Italy, Capra came to the United States with his family in 1903. His work often reflected an idealized vision of the American dream, perhaps spurned by his own experiences as an immigrant. Depression-era audiences lapped up his sweetly sentimental screwball comedies, which often centered on the plight of the common man.

SEEOscar Best Director Gallery: Every Winner In Academy Award History

He earned his first Oscar nomination for directing “Lady for a Day” (1933), and his loss was infamously embarrassing: when presented Will Rogers opened the envelope, he said, “Come up and get it,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Frank Capra movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Frank Capra movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Frank Capra would’ve celebrated his 122nd birthday on May 18, 2019. The three-time Oscar winner dominated the box office throughout the 1930s with his populist fables, nicknamed “Capra-corn.” Yet how many of these titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, take a look back at 12 of Capra’s greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1897 in Siciliy, Italy, Capra came to the United States with his family in 1903. His work often reflected an idealized vision of the American dream, perhaps spurned by his own experiences as an immigrant. Depression-era audiences lapped up his sweetly sentimental screwball comedies, which often centered on the plight of the common man.

He earned his first Oscar nomination for directing “Lady for a Day” (1933), and his loss was infamously embarrassing: when presented Will Rogers opened the envelope, he said, “Come up and get it, Frank!” Capra bounded to the stage, only to learned that
See full article at Gold Derby »

Cary Grant movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘His Girl Friday,’ ‘North by Northwest,’ ‘Penny Serenade’

Cary Grant movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘His Girl Friday,’ ‘North by Northwest,’ ‘Penny Serenade’
He was born Archibald Alec Leach in South West England on January 18, 1904. As a teen, he became attracted to show biz at an early age, becoming friends with a troupe of acrobats and doing odd jobs while hanging out backstage at theaters. At 16, he would travel by ship to the United States, where he would eventually change his name to Cary Grant after signing his first movie contract in 1931. He became one of the most admired and beloved leading men that Hollywood would ever produce.

SEEAlfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best

Grant’s suave looks and elegant voice served him well when he started acting in films, but his artistry and nuance on screen matured considerably over the years. He would work with the master Alfred Hitchcock several times, including “North by Northwest,” “Notorious” and “To Catch a Thief.” Grant was also quite deft with comedy roles,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Cary Grant movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Cary Grant movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
He was born Archibald Alec Leach in South West England on January 18, 1904. As a teen, he became attracted to show biz at an early age, becoming friends with a troupe of acrobats and doing odd jobs while hanging out backstage at theaters. At 16, he would travel by ship to the United States, where he would eventually change his name to Cary Grant after signing his first movie contract in 1931. He became one of the most admired and beloved leading men that Hollywood would ever produce.

Grant’s suave looks and elegant voice served him well when he started acting in films, but his artistry and nuance on screen matured considerably over the years. He would work with the master Alfred Hitchcock several times, including “North by Northwest,” “Notorious” and “To Catch a Thief.” Grant was also quite deft with comedy roles, including “His Girl Friday,” “The Awful Truth,” “Arsenic and Old Lace
See full article at Gold Derby »

American Horror Story: Why That Arsenic Scene Is Completely Bogus

  • BuzzSugar
We've been wondering for a while when Sarah Paulson's Ally would come back into play in a serious way on American Horror Story: Cult. After Kai's followers torture her into madness then get her embroiled in a mass shooting, she is carted off to the psych ward, and we haven't seen much of her (save for a momentary twist) since. That is, until the latest episode, "Drink the Kool-Aid," when Ally comes back with a vengeance. Happy Halloween! Have some arsenic! In the episode, Ally pretends like she wants to reunite her family and get away from Kai, but what she really wants is revenge - and Ivy is her No. 1 target. Betrayal always hurts the most when it is done by those closest to you, so Ivy joining up with Kai to take out Ally and take Oz away from her - oh, and also the pesky detail
See full article at BuzzSugar »

The 100 Greatest Comedies of All-Time, According to BBC’s Critics Poll

After polling critics from around the world for the greatest American films of all-time, BBC has now forged ahead in the attempt to get a consensus on the best comedies of all-time. After polling 253 film critics, including 118 women and 135 men, from 52 countries and six continents a simple, the list of the 100 greatest is now here.

Featuring canonical classics such as Some Like It Hot, Dr. Strangelove, Annie Hall, Duck Soup, Playtime, and more in the top 10, there’s some interesting observations looking at the rest of the list. Toni Erdmann is the most recent inclusion, while the highest Wes Anderson pick is The Royal Tenenbaums. There’s also a healthy dose of Chaplin and Lubitsch with four films each, and the recently departed Jerry Lewis has a pair of inclusions.

Check out the list below (and my ballot) and see more on their official site.

100. (tie) The King of Comedy (Martin Scorsese,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Scott’s TCM Fest Dispatch, Part One: Silliness

This is my seventh TCM Classic Film Festival. At a certain point, some things become routine – one learns to expect the exhaustion at the dawn of day three (of four), the constant negotiation between personal viewing whims and rare presentations, the way plots and aesthetic choices start to run together, and the suspicion that explaining the draw of such an event to those not immediately inclined to attend it may come across a touch insane. Film festivals are innately demanding experiences, but between the pleasure of its programming, the consolidation of the venues, and the brevity of most of its films’ running times, few make it so easy to watch four, five, six movies in a day. You tell your coworkers on Monday what you did all weekend, and it starts to not make a lot of sense. But somehow, in the midst of it all, the point of it couldn’t be clearer.
See full article at CriterionCast »

#fav7films: Mindy Kaling and Other Indie Stars Reveal Their Favorite Movies on Twitter

  • Indiewire
#fav7films: Mindy Kaling and Other Indie Stars Reveal Their Favorite Movies on Twitter
Whether you wanted to or not, you probably learned a lot of people’s seven favorite films yesterday. #fav7films was the hashtag du jour, presumably because a standard top 10 would have been more likely to go over Twitter’s 140-character limit, and among the many civvies chiming in were a number of actors and filmmakers. Here, for your perusing pleasure, is a sampling of their favorites.

Read More: Emmy Nominees React To Snubs And Surprises On Twitter

#fav7films

(I can’t resist)

24 hr Party People

The Man Who Would Be King

Diner

Sound of Music

Office Space

Kung Fu Hustle

La Dolce Vita

Adam McKay (@GhostPanther) August 16, 2016

#fav7films Jesus’s son. Shortcuts. Royal tenenbaums. Best in show. City of God. Personal Velocity. The big Lebowski.

Amy Schumer (@amyschumer) August 16, 2016

#fav7films

Singin’ in the Rain

Squid and the Whale

Broadcast News

Hannah and Her Sisters

Bob & Carol
See full article at Indiewire »

Stage Tube: On This Day for 6/26/16- Arsenic And Old Lace

Today in 1986, Arsenic and Old Lace opened at the 46th Street Theatre now the Richard Rogers Theatre where it ran for 221 performances. Arsenic and Old Lace is a play by American playwright Joseph Kesselring, written in 1939. It has become best known through the film adaptation starring Cary Grant and directed by Frank Capra. The play is a farcical black comedy revolving around Mortimer Brewster, a drama critic who must deal with his crazy, homicidal family and local police in Brooklyn, NY, as he debates whether to go through with his recent promise to marry the woman he loves.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Friday Noir #145: ‘Behind Green Lights’ goes the route of comedy with mixed results

Behind Green Lights

Written by Charles G. Booth

Directed by Otto Brower

U.S.A., 1946

*This film is in the public domain and can be viewed legally and for free online. However, the version currently circulating has a small continuity glitch early in the film at about the 1-minute mark. The movie will suddenly play about 5 seconds of a scene that chronologically comes a couple of minutes later. It is the only technical issue with the print however. The rest of the movie plays out perfectly fine.

On what began as an ordinary night at the police station, Lt. Sam Carson (William Gargan) is notified of a vehicle parked on the sidewalk just in front of the building. Within the vehicle is the body of the late Walter Bard (Bernard Nedell), a private detective recently engaged in some rather politically relevant cases. Among the suspects possibly involved in man’s
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The WGA Names the 101 Funniest Screenplays of All Time

  • Cinelinx
Let’s end the year with a celebration of the funniest comedy scripts ever written. The Writer’s Guild of America has chosen the 101 best laugh-getting screenplays. Keep in mind that this is all about the writing, not the cast or the director.

1.Annie Hall (1977)

2. Some Like it Hot (1959)

3. Groundhog Day (1993)

4. Airplane! (1980)

5. Tootsie (1982)

6. Young Frankenstein (1974)

7. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

8. Blazing Saddles (1974)

9. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

10. National Lampoon’s Animal House (1978)

11. This is Spinal Tap (1984)

12. The Producers (1967)

13. The Big Lebowski (1998)

14. Ghostbusters (1984)

15. When Harry Met Sally (1989)

16. Bridesmaids (2011)

17. Duck Soup (1933)

18. There’s Something About Mary (1998)

19. The Jerk (1979)

20. A Fish Called Wanda (1988)

21. His Girl Friday (1940)

22. The Princess Bride (1987)

23. Raising Arizona (1987)

24. Bringing Up Baby (1938)

25. Caddyshack (1980)

26. Monty Python’s Life of Brian (1979)

27. The Graduate (1967)

28. The Apartment (1960)

29. Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (2006)

30. The Hangover (2009)

31. The 40-Year-Old Virgin (2005)

32. The Lady Eve
See full article at Cinelinx »

The 101 Funniest Screenplays of All-Time, According to the WGA

Perhaps the most subjective genre in cinema, the same comedy can cause one viewer to have tears of laughter and another to not crack a smile. So, while knowing there can be no definitive list of the finest in the genre, the Writers Guild of America attempted to narrow down the 101 funniest screenplays. Noting the distinction from the best in the genre, these 101 films should simply produce the most laughs.

Topping the list is Woody Allen‘s Best Picture-winning Annie Hall, a choice difficult to argue with. Rounding out the top five were Some Like it Hot, Groundhog Day, Airplane! and Tootsie, while films from the Coens, Stanley Kubrick, Wes Anderson, and Edgar Wright were also mentioned. There are also some genuine head-scratching inclusions, including The Hangover at 30, and, as much as I enjoy the film, Bridesmaids nearly making the top 15, but overall, if one is looking to brighten their mood,
See full article at The Film Stage »

[Tiff Review] The Women He’s Undressed

A performative exploration of Australia’s own Orry-Kelly, perhaps most infamously known as Cary Grant’s lover, Women He’s Undressed is a playful look at the man behind the costumes worn by Marilyn Monroe, Betty Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Rosalind Russell, and Errol Flynn, amongst other legends of Hollywood’s Golden Age. The film’s story is told via an electrifying mix of first-person interviews, performances of Orry-Kelly’s letters, and archival materials, including clips from his films Some Like It Hot, The Maltese Falcon, Les Girls, and Arsenic and Old Lace.

The film’s charms exist in the performative elements contextualized amongst the film’s interviewees. Director Gillian Armstrong (known for her narrative films Little Women and Oscar and Lucinda) paints a picture partially routed in national pride, about a small town boy from rural New South Wales who makes good in Hollywood. The fragmented nature of the narrative
See full article at The Film Stage »

Long Before Day-Lewis, Oscar-Nominated Actor Played Lincoln: TCM 'Stars' Series Continues

Raymond Massey ca. 1940. Raymond Massey movies: From Lincoln to Boris Karloff Though hardly remembered today, the Toronto-born Raymond Massey was a top supporting player – and sometime lead – in both British and American movies from the early '30s all the way to the early '60s. During that period, Massey was featured in nearly 50 films. Turner Classic Movies generally selects the same old MGM / Rko / Warner Bros. stars for its annual “Summer Under the Stars” series. For that reason, it's great to see someone like Raymond Massey – who was with Warners in the '40s – be the focus of a whole day: Sat., Aug. 8, '15. (See TCM's Raymond Massey movie schedule further below.) Admittedly, despite his prestige – his stage credits included the title role in the short-lived 1931 Broadway production of Hamlet – the quality of Massey's performances varied wildly. Sometimes he could be quite effective; most of the time, however, he was an unabashed scenery chewer,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Stage Tube: On This Day for 6/26/15- Arsenic And Old Lace

Today in 1986, Arsenic and Old Lace opened at the 46th Street Theatre now the Richard Rogers Theatre where it ran for 221 performances. Arsenic and Old Lace is a play by American playwright Joseph Kesselring, written in 1939. It has become best known through the film adaptation starring Cary Grant and directed by Frank Capra. The play is a farcical black comedy revolving around Mortimer Brewster, a drama critic who must deal with his crazy, homicidal family and local police in Brooklyn, NY, as he debates whether to go through with his recent promise to marry the woman he loves.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Here's The Movie Characters Making Out Supercut You Need In Your Life

Valentine.s Day is just around the corner, and to celebrate this most sacred of romantic holidays we have a supercut that has been created to feature an array of kisses from over 100 movies. You can watch the clip to get in the mood for Valentines below. Can you feel the love? Movieclips. montage is a rather delightful homage to some of the most romantic moments in cinematic history. My personal favorites include little tip of the hats to Gone With The Wind, American Beauty and Arsenic And Old Lace. I mean, who doesn.t love seeing Cary Grant having a kiss? However, they all actually pale in comparison to Cinema Paradiso.s mesmeric kissing montage - which is poignant enough to make even the most heart-broken soul believe in love again. Check it out here. Warning, you.ll almost certainly start to weep while watching it though. Movieclips didn
See full article at Cinema Blend »

Debbie Allen & Phylicia Rashad Sign Up for 'Arsenic and Old Lace' Playing the Brewster Sisters

Sisters Debbie Allen and Phylicia Rashad are both in producer Otis Sallid's sights to star in a revival of playwright Joseph O. Kesselring's "Arsenic and Old Lace," as the Brewster sisters who are at the center of the narrative. Aiming for a 2015-2016 Broadway bow, Sallid tells Playbill: "For the last four years, I've been trying to get this production up and running. It's always hard to get Phylicia and Debbie on board for the same thing. I thought it would be a brilliant, brilliant idea to get Debbie Allen and Phylicia Rashad in a Broadway production of 'Arsenic and Old Lace.' They, at this point, have agreed to do it." So, the...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

A Year with Kate: Grace Quigley (1984)

Episode 46 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn makes a comedy about suicide with Nick Nolte because she's a living legend and she can do whatever she wants.

The truth about a career that spans seven decades, is that for the majority of that career, you'll be what’s traditionally thought of as “old.” Hollywood does not like “old.” The magnificent part of watching Katharine Hepburn age has been watching her flip old age (and Hollywood) the bird. True, her head wobbles, her hair is gray, and her voice is reedy. Still, she leaps after hot air balloons, bicycles, hauls wood, and even wins Academy Awards at an age far past what would traditionally be considered “her prime.” For the past few years, Kate has looked old, sounded old, and even talked about being old, but the stubbornly energetic woman has never felt old. Which is why Grace Quigley is more than a little scary.
See full article at FilmExperience »

See Reddit users’ favorite movie from each year

Throughout the summer, an admin on the r/movies subreddit has been leading Reddit users in a poll of the best movies from every year for the last 100 years called 100 Years of Yearly Cinema. The poll concluded three days ago, and the list of every movie from 1914 to 2013 has been published today.

Users were asked to nominate films from a given year and up-vote their favorite nominees. The full list includes the outright winner along with the first two runners-up from each year. The list is mostly a predictable assortment of IMDb favorites and certified classics, but a few surprise gems have also risen to the top of the crust, including the early experimental documentary Man With a Movie Camera in 1929, Abel Gance’s J’Accuse! in 1919, the Fred Astaire film Top Hat over Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps in 1935, and Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing over John Ford’s
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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