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Cry 'Havoc' (1943) Poster

(1943)

Trivia

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Joan Crawford was offered the lead role but turned it down, saying "It should have been called 'The Women Go to War'." Her part was played by Joan Blondell.
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The play originally opened in a small theater in Hollywood, CA, in late September 1942, with the title "Cry Havoc". It opened on Broadway in New York City on 25 December 1942 with the title "Proof Through the Night", but changed the title back to "Cry Havoc" on 30 December 1942, probably because of bad notices. However, it closed on 2 January 1943 after only 11 performances. The opening night cast included Carol Channing and Ann Shoemaker.
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During the Hollywood run, MGM purchased the rights to the play for $20,000 and later paid an additional $15,000 for the rights to the Broadway production.
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The shots of the Japanese aircraft crashing in flames during a raid were previously used in Mrs. Miniver (1942), where it was a German Messerschmitt Bf 110.
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Although Karl Freund is credited on screen as director of photography, Hal Rosher is listed for this job in all "Hollywood Reporter" production charts.
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The title is from William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." "Cry 'Havoc,' and let slip the dogs of war." It's part of Marc Antony's speech that begins with "Friends, Romans, countrymen--lend me your ears."
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Morris Ankrum is in studio records for playing "Chaplain" in this film, but he did not appear in the released print.
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This film received its USA television premiere in Los Angeles Wednesday 17 October 1956 on KTTV (Channel 11), followed by Philadelphia Saturday 20 October 1956 on WFIL (Channel 6), by Altoona PA Thursday 22 November 1956 on WFBG (Channel 10), by Minneapolis Sunday 23 December 1956 on KMGM (Channel 9), by Omaha Wednesday 9 January 1957 on WOW (Channel 6), by Chicago Monday 14 January 1957 on WBBM (Channel 2) and by Seattle 23 April 1957 on KING (Channel 5); its New York City television premiere took place 23 November 1957 on WCBS (Channel 2), and in San Francisco it first aired 10 February 1958 on KGO (Channel 7).
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While sitting in the radio shack harranging Smittys departure, Pat Conlin uses the racist quote "We're all free, white and 21"
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The character of Connie was the most drastic change from play to film. In the film she is a shy pretty young nurse who is sadly shot down while swimming. In the play, Connie is actually a Nazi spy who sells out the other nurses, kills one of them, and is killed trying to surrender.
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No men are listed in the credits though several appear as wounded soldiers who interact with the nurses. The soldier who dies in Connie's (Ella Raines) arms is Robert Mitchum.
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