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The Mark of Zorro (1940) Poster

Goofs

Jump to: Anachronisms (3)  | Character error (3)  | Continuity (4)  | Revealing mistakes (1)

Anachronisms 

The soldiers at the beginning of the film wager 10 Pesos. This is in Spanish Mexico where the currency would be the Escudo not the Mexican Peso.
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When Don Diego enters the cantina, after first landing in California, a musician is playing a Martin guitar, about a century before the Martin company was founded.
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Both in this version, and in the Disney version of the Zorro story, Don Alejandro--who obviously has lived most of his life in the 18th century--wears a full beard, a style that was not in fashion during that century. It was not until the time of Napoleon--this story is set very early in the 19th century--that hair on the face became fashionable again, with the result that the 19th century is justly famous for its great variety of fanciful facial hairstyles.
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Character error 

The character "Captain Esteban Pasquale" uses the Italian spelling for his surname. The Spanish spelling is Pascual.
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When Diego dines with the Quinteros, Inez asks him to show them "the new dance steps." He and Lolita then dance together, but somehow the sheltered young Lolita knows the dance perfectly. This doesn't make sense if it contains "new dance steps" that even society-mad Inez doesn't know.
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When Sgt Gonzales, enters the Mission, while chasing Zorro, he is talking to Father Felipe and Diego De Vega, you can see his false mustache over his left lip coming apart from his face (55:10).
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Continuity 

When the soldiers are looking for Zorro after he threatens Quintero, it is nighttime (they are carrying torches, and it is dark), yet when they chase him, it is day. This seems to be the case in many of Darryl F. Zanuck's films - Jesse James, for example.
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After Zorro breaks into the Alcalde's home, threatens him, and meets Lolita, he is shortly, thereafter, seen slashing down a "Wanted" poster offering 20,000 pesos for his capture. Later, when he holds up the tax collectors after they have gathered tax money from the peons, as he robs the tax collectors, in the background can be seen another "Wanted" poster offering 5,000 pesos reward for the capture of Zorro. In a subsequent scene moments later, they again show the poster offering 20,000 pesos reward for Zorro's capture.
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When the padre leaves the cell, he has a pistol in his right hand. When he starts hitting the soldiers, he has a tree limb in his right hand. When the Alcade resigns, the padre escorts him, and the pistol is back in his right hand.
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When Esteban falls down, he knocks a picture off the wall, which then disappears and is not seen on the floor. In the next shot, the picture is seen on the floor in front of Esteban, when Diego throws his swords down on top of it
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Revealing mistakes 

The wanted posters are printed in English. While it's common in Hollywood movies to have English substitute for a foreign language, movie logic usually dictates that the written word be in the language the characters were really speaking - Spanish, in this case. Oddly enough, the posters are allegedly for the benefit of 18th-century Californian peasants, most of whom would never have learned to read anyway.
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Trivia | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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