Thank You, Mr. Moto (1937) Poster

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8/10
Treasure Maps Usually Lead To A Fun Story
ccthemovieman-116 January 2008
Treasure maps have always intrigued viewers. I remember seeing a lot of television shows when I was a kid where a hidden treasure was buried somewhere and people fought for the maps to find the treasure. The stories have run the gamut from Superman episodes to the big screen with "Long John Silver" and "Indiana Jones." Usually the stories are fun, and suspenseful.

In this second-of-eight "Mr. Moto" movies, the treasure lies in the tomb of Madeline....er, Ghengis Kahn. I won't divulge too much of the story because what happens right at the beginning isn't fully revealed until the end but it ties the whole thing together.

This is my second look at this series and one thing I really get a kick out of is the vocabulary of Mr. Moto, played by the great Peter Lorre. He has a great way with the English language and he's fun to hear. He doesn't crack jokes like Charlie Chan, but he's very well-spoken and very polite like his counterpart. He's also very physical when he needs to be. Unlike Charlie, Mr. Moto will stab you to death if need be, as he does several times in this film! Shocking! He also likes to literally jump through the air and attack his adversaries. Cool! This guy would be embraced by the WWF, if that wrestling federation had been around in the 1930s.

There are plenty of surprises, so I'll leave it just at that. Fans of the series should enjoy the "Oriental intrigue" in here. I only wish - not for PC reasons but for credibility - they had Asian actors playing the roles. I actually laughed when I saw John Carradine playing an Asian! There is one "real one" in here: Philip Ahn as 'Prince Chung." Actually, he was Korean-American. Speaking of roles, Jayne Regan as "Eleanor Joyce" was a bit intriguing in the female. She had a nice wholesome, pretty look to her and

Another interesting real-life story is Pauline Frederick who played "Madame Chung." A proper Bostonian, she looked anything but Asian but the sad story with this actress is that this was her last movie. She died at the young age of 55 the following year, of asthma.

These Mr. Moto movies always have a lot of interesting facets to them, and have a good combination of intelligent and sometimes witty dialog (i.e. "Well, there's nothing like a murder to ruin a perfectly good evening,") along with an ample supply of action and intrigue.
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10/10
One of the best Mr.Motos
Film_Dex26 October 2005
I love the Mr. Moto series. My favorite is the first, Think Fast, Mr. Moto, but this second in the series comes a close second. Mr.Moto has been tasked (by whom we don't know) to locate the treasure of Genghis Kahn. His good friend Prince Chung is a descendant of Kahn, and cares for 5 (one was stolen) scrolls that, when put together with the remaining two, reveal the location of the tomb of Genghis Kahn, and within it, a vast treasure.

Considering how Japanese/Chinese relations were at the time, the friendship of Moto and Chung is perhaps unusual, but its very touching.

John Carradine does a lovely turn as the slimy antique dealer Parera, Thomas Beck is the usual boyish hero in love with the girl. Philip Ahn is quite good as Prince Chung. Why his mother was played by Pauline Frederick instead of a Chinese woman I do not know, but she did quite a good job in her last movie.

Quite a few Chinese actors had walk ons in this movie, and the Chinese police are shown in a good light - they too are anxious to stop the smuggling of art objects.

It's fast paced, it's fun, I recommend it.
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7/10
Thank You, Mr. Moto (1938) ***
JoeKarlosi1 September 2006
This is the second Mr. Moto film and I enjoyed the hell out of it! I've only got two movies of this series under my belt at the time of this writing but I liked this entry even more than the first one, which was called THINK FAST, MR. MOTO. I was struck by how much the Moto character and the formula of this film in particular reminded me of James Bond; I could almost see Sean Connery somewhere in here, if he had taken on 007 twenty-five years sooner!

Peter Lorre again plays the very eccentric Mr. Moto, and this time he's trying to find the tomb of Genghis Khan, which can only be located by securing seven ancient scrolls with intricate artwork drawn on them that may provide the desired information. There is a treasure housed in the burial place, and so Moto is not the only seeker interested in obtaining each of these valued art scrolls. Lorre is very good in this part, and he displays a varying array of moods as Mr. Moto. This chapter benefits from a generous amount of wham-bam action and also some necessary violence which seems daring for the times in which the production was made. It's also a real treat to see Sig Rumann here again as the heavy, as well as a change of pace stint by John Carradine as a foreign antiques dealer. Good stuff. Thank You indeed, Mr. Moto. *** out of ****
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7/10
... And Thank You, Twentieth Century Fox!
Spondonman15 April 2007
This was the 2nd of the 8 Fox Moto's, and like its predecessor Think Fast, was a fast paced action/detective film with high production values and a fine cast of goodies and baddies.

It starts out in the Gobi Desert with Moto in possession of something valuable, stabbing an attacker to death and burying him without a pause – all becomes clear an hour later. Back in civilised China he and a bunch of gangsters are after 7 linen scrolls which indicate the whereabouts of Genghis Khan's fortune – Moto has one, nouveau poor Prince Chung and his rigid mother have the others … for the time being. When Moto finally gets to see them his monotone evaluation of their beauty: "The harmony of line and colour – this is truly a voiceless poem" – always makes me think of John Wayne's immortal line in The Greatest Story Ever Told. Non-Oriental Austrian Peter Lorre again plays the importer and detective with class, vim and believably if you understand you're using up your time watching a work of fantasy. Thomas Beck's in here playing handsome devil to glamorous Jayne Regan this time; both had short movie careers. And from the collection of baddies nasty Sidney Blackmer especially stood out, but even he didn't get to kill as many as Moto did! There's a chase sequence near the end which is brought to a rather dramatic conclusion – attention recommended!

Great stuff as usual for the enlightened, nothing here for the serious. You watch this, you savvy?
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7/10
"Well there's nothing like a murder to ruin a perfectly good evening."
classicsoncall3 March 2007
Warning: Spoilers
I usually find it helpful to keep a scorecard when watching a Charlie Chan film to keep track of all the characters, for this one, you need it just for the action. Yikes! - it took about twenty movies in the Chan franchise to build up to four dead bodies in one outing, but here they pile up fast and furious. Mr. Moto (Peter Lorre) is not above dispatching a few himself, and just as he did in the first film of the series (Think Fast, Mr. Moto), winds up throwing a man over board. There are other similarities as well, the biggest coincidence being the use of the name Marco Polo; here it's the name of a bridge, while in 'Think Fast', it was the name of a cruise ship.

By this time, we know Moto to be an importer operating as a detective, but here we learn that he's also an adventurer, explorer, soldier of fortune and one of the Orient's great mysteries. Or so he's described by businessman Tom Nelson (Thomas Beck). In the story, Moto seeks to protect a missing scroll that when joined together with others to form a pattern, indicates the location of the burial place of Genghis Khan and a vast treasure. Of course, a host of others seek to own the desired scroll, as much as Madame Chung (Pauline Frederick) and her son, the Prince (Philip Ahn) are determined to protect it.

Oddities abound in the film, as in the opening scene when Moto in disguise dispatches an assassin in the Gobi Desert, and proceeds to bury him - inside the tent! John Carradine makes an appearance in the story as an antiques dealer named Periera, and for some unexplained reason uses the terms 'senor' and 'senorita' when addressing Nelson and Eleanor Joyce (Jayne Regan). And say, could there really have been an American bar in China in 1937 called 'Mike's Place'?

But you know what, most of it doesn't matter, because Mr. Moto is a bundle of energy uncovering the bad guys and tracking down the stolen Chung scrolls. He even concocts a romantic link between the main heavy Koerger (Sidney Blackmer) and Miss Joyce to create a jealous rage in Madame Tchernov (Nedda Harrigan), thereby undermining the villain's plot to discover the treasure. But the biggest shock of all is the way it ends, and for that you'll have to see the picture.

With just a couple of the Mr. Moto films under my belt for now, it's quite unusual to see how differently he operates compared to the other Oriental Detectives of the era, notably Charlie Chan and Mr. Wong. Whereas the latter two solved their cases much more methodically, Moto combines clever analysis and martial action to achieve his results, and the results are entirely entertaining. Peter Lorre adds a distinctive flair to the Moto persona, and gets one excited about catching the next film in the series - Oh, so!
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7/10
As Mr. Moto, Peter Lorre is ruthless and amusing...and don't get in a fight with him. Moto usually leaves his opponents dead
Terrell-41 March 2008
"Adventurer, explorer, soldier of fortune...one of the Orient's mysteries. No one knows much about him, except that when he shows up something usually happens." It would be wise to remember, also, that when Kentaro Moto fights an opponent, he most often wins by killing the man.

Mr. Moto (Peter Lorre), in his second film adventure for Twentieth Century Fox, is on the hunt for a rare scroll painting, one of seven that together hold the key to where in the Gobi desert lies the lost tomb of Genghis Khan...a tomb filled with gold, gems and legendary treasure. The scrolls themselves are priceless works of art from the time of Kublai Khan that had been in the possession of a noble handmaiden to the last great Chinese empress. But the seventh had been stolen from her and her son. Mr. Moto is on the trail, but so is a group of unscrupulous collectors and fortune hunters who won't stop at murder to achieve their end.

All this starts out in a caravan crossing the Gobi with Mr. Moto disguised to the nines and fending off a knife-wielding camel driver. Then we're in exotic Pekin (Beijing nowadays) for the rest of the movie, moving from posh hotels filled with wealthy Westerners (and Mr. Moto) wearing white suits and shoes to ancient, crowded streets filled with antique shops, hurrying Chinese, carts, rickshaws and gunmen. The climax is a struggle in a filthy river and aboard a huge junk. Mr. Moto's death toll is not excessive considering the provocations. The scrolls, now united, meet an honorable fate. We even get a bit of philosophy from Mr. Moto to ponder while we struggle for our last breath..."Birth is not a beginning...death is not an end."

Thank You, Mr. Moto works so well because it moves briskly and the Moto character is not condescended to, or at least not much. There also are some vivid character actors to enjoy. Two of my favorites are Sig Ruman as Colonel Tchernov, a wealthy and ruthless man who will have what he wants to have. Ruman, for me, always looked impressive as a nobleman or pompous boor. When I hear his voice and accent, I can't help but smile at the sound of all those comic Nazis he played later in movies such as To Be or Not to Be and Stalag 17. John Carradine shows up as Periera, a small but pungent part as an obsequious and unreliable antiques dealer. Most of all, however, the Mr. Moto movies are such good entertainment because of Peter Lorre. He manages to look innocent while being no one's fool. Lorre gives us a ruthless and amusing portrayal.
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7/10
Lorre was Outstanding
whpratt112 June 2008
Enjoyed this 1937 film starring Peter Lorre as Mr. Kentaro Moto who is an Interpole Detective and also an adventurer. Mr. Moto is assigned to track down some very rare Chinese scrolls or Treasure Maps which will lead to the secret treasure of Genghis Khan worth over 10 Million Dollars. There are many women and men looking for these maps and they need all seven of them in order to solve the mystery as to just where the Genghis Khan fortune is hidden. John Carradine gives a great supporting role as a Peniera, Antique Dealer who is a very shady character and tries to sell people phony antiques at very high prices. Peter Lorre tried to play a Chinese Detective, but I am afraid his voice and rolling hard boiled eyes gives him away. This is a very entertaining film and if you like Peter Lorre, you will love this Moto Series. Enjoy.
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6/10
really good Mr. Moto
blanche-22 September 2013
Peter Lorre is in top form as Mr. Moto in "Thank you, Mr. Moto," the 1937 second entry into the series.

Here Mr. Moto is on the trail of ancient scrolls that, once put together, lead one to the grave of Genghis Khan and millions of dollars. Moto has one scroll; the rest of them are owned by Madame Chung and her son (Pauline Frederick and Philip Ahn), who protect them as a duty to their ancestors, to keep the grave of Genghis Khan from desecration. Naturally there is a nefarious bunch after the scrolls, including Sidney Blackmer, Nedda Harrigan, and Sig Rumann. John Carradine is on hand as an unscrupulous antique dealer, rounding out a good cast with Jayne Regan and Tom Nelson as the young leads.

Chase scenes, murder, and gunfire all are aplenty here, but the end is very touching. Peter Lorre is marvelous. It's a shame that once Pearl Harbor was bombed, we had to say goodbye to Mr. Moto.
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8/10
This Moto entry has unexpected pleasures
JimB-414 March 2009
This is a fairly typical Mr. Moto film from the superb B-unit at Twentieth Century Fox, but I was quite surprised by certain elements of depth in the film. There are moments of brutality that exceed what was standard in films, especially B-films, of the time. But more interesting was the emotional factor. One scene, the last scene between Peter Lorre's Moto and Philip Ahn's Prince Chung, is really amazing for its humanity and poignant quality, something not readily found in 67-minute programmers of the period. The Moto films, like the Charlie Chans Fox made, are all splendidly made little pictures. This one is better than most.
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8/10
Mr. Moto must track down a complete set of ancient Chinese Scrolls to solve multiple murders.
maksquibs10 April 2008
Exemplary Mr Moto entry is the darkest in the series and boasts a compelling emotional undertow that's as effective as it is unexpected. For once, the lame comic relief is expunged (studio execs, no doubt, forced its quick return) which allows Peter Lorre's wonderful characterization an extra bit of space to work in while following the procedural detective tropes and handling Moto's apt witticisms. (That's Lorre's stunt double handling the physical stuff.) The basic story involving some antique Chinese scrolls that make up a sort of treasure map was (atypically) based on a novel by Moto creator John P. Marquand and this may add to the tough, blunt tone hiding just below the surface. All the Moto films entertain, but this one sticks with you.
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7/10
"Please don't be alarmed. I'm only attempting to break into the safe."
utgard144 March 2014
Mr. Moto (Peter Lorre) is out to find ancient scrolls that, when put together, will create a map to the tomb of Genghis Khan. He must contend with nefarious Sidney Blackmer & co. Second in the Mr. Moto detective series is quite possibly the best. Nice cast that includes Sig Ruman and Thomas Beck, who were both in Think Fast, Mr. Moto. John Carradine plays a disreputable antiquities dealer. Sidney Blackmer was born with a permanent scowl on his face that made him an easy choice to play the villain in movies like this. Philip Ahn gives a sensitive, dignified performance as Prince Chung. He really steals the show from the more well-known supporting actors.

The interesting thing about Mr. Moto was that he was not above breaking the law or even killing. He even makes jokes about it. I'm not sure how they got away with this in a picture made after the Code was in full force. It's one of the (many) things that separates this series from Charlie Chan. But it's also one of the drawbacks as you never really feel any emotional connection to Moto as you do with Chan. Still, it's a fun series and this is probably the best of the lot.
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7/10
Middling Moto
Anne_Sharp16 July 2001
It's too bad this Moto entry strayed so far from its source material, as the arrogant Chinese prince and bandits in the original John P. Marquand novel were ever so much more interesting than the generic Eurogangsters and Philip Ahn's creepily Oedipal Prince Cheung in this one. Though the portrayal of Moto in the Peter Lorre-Sol Wurtzel series was never more than sketchy, he's even more fragmented motivationally in this lively but logistically incoherent adventure. Peter seems to have given up all hope of establishing a dramatic through-line and just plays it scene by scene according to whatever mood he was in, which makes it all the more dizzying to try and follow.
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8/10
Better than most in the series thanks to a liberal dose of killings by Mr. Moto!
MartinHafer10 June 2008
Warning: Spoilers
Unlike most B-mysteries of the 1930s and 40s, this one stands out because the lead actually kills. Granted, the killings were all justified, but you never would have seen Charlie Chan or Sherlock Holmes kill three men in a single film--let alone in all their films! Moto is simply a one-man killing machine as he works to uncover the mystery behind a group of desperate criminals who will stop at nothing to steal seven scrolls--which, together, will lead them to the treasure of Genghis Khan. While this is definitely true of the first two Moto films, later they softened his image and made him more like Charlie Chan--and as a result the later films were a bit more bland.

In addition to Moto being such a dangerous man, I also appreciated the film because for a long time it was unclear who Moto was working for--the police, insurance companies or just himself. This lack of clarity and rather amoral tone of the film made it a unique viewing experience! Watch this one and see one of the better examples of the genre.

The only negative was having a German guy playing Moto--I'm sure many Asian-Americans would have given their souls to play this part!
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9/10
Peter Lorre Is Senational
Hitchcoc26 January 2016
The Mr. Moto series invites us into the world of one of the most complex and dangerous of men, the irrepressible Japanese investigator, played by Peter Lorre. In this, the second episode, he is on the hunt for some ancient scrolls that, when put together, reveal the location of the treasure of Genghis Kahn. Of course, such a treasure is sure to draw the worst of society. We find ourselves in China where imperialists are everywhere. Let's face it. These people, if one were to really think about it, are almost as bad as the signature bad guys. They treat the native people like dirt and run around in their fancy suits and opulence. Lorre finds himself in the middle of things as the bodies start to pile up. An attractive young woman and her suitor are around when a Chinese prince and his mother are assaulted by a group of dangerous characters. This leads to many twists and turns. I have recently watched the Charlie Chan canon and they can't hold a candle to these, mainly because of Peter Lorre.
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6/10
The Tomb of Genghis Khan
bkoganbing14 April 2017
The second Mr. Moto feature finds Peter Lorre on the Chinese frontier of the Gobi Desert with an archaeological expedition finding the last of a set of seven scrolls. They allegedly will lead to the as yet undiscovered tomb of Genghis Khan. Undiscovered and hopefully unpilfered like King Tut's tomb was it will contain fabulous riches.

At least that's what villains Sidney Blackmer and two timing wife Nedda Harrigan hope for. Blackmer has already killed Harrigan's husband Sig Ruman for the other scrolls. Mother and son Philip Ahn and Pauline Frederick also die for these scrolls in one of the bloodiest of Mr. Moto features.

Of course in the end Moto does triumph and when he does he keeps a vow to a dying man. He also plays on Frederick's jealousy and knowledge of what a rat Blackmer can be.

Fans of the series will like this.
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8/10
Mr. Moto and the Missing Scroll
lugonian25 June 2016
THANK YOU, MR. MOTO (20th Century-Fox, 1937), directed by Norman Foster, stars Peter Lorre in the title role of Kentaro Moto best described as "venture explorer and soldier of fortune," but actually a Japanese confidential investigator who "wherever he shows up, something always happens." Following its initial entry, THINK FAST, MR. MOTO (1937), this second installment overall, is quite good, in fact, the best in the entire series of eight. After viewing it, it's easy to see why.

Based on the story by its creator, John P. Marquand, with original screenplay by Norman Foster and Wallis Cooper, the plot opens in the Great Gobi Desert in China where Mr. Moto (Peter Lorre), disguised as a Mongolian camel driver, immediately suspecting his life to be in danger. His hunch is right after nearly getting hoofed by a horse rider in the windy desert sands, and later finding a mysterious figure entering his tent with intent to kill. In Peiping, Mr. Moto is discovered holding a secret document, leading to a merry chase through the city streets before making it to his hotel room (Number 303) to his manservant, Wing (Chester Gan), and pet cat. After removing his disguise, Moto arrives to a garden party of various guests, including Thomas Nelson (Thomas Beck), a young American; Eleanor Joyce (Jayne Reagan) from California who's preparing to author a book about Chinese art; Colonel Tchernov (Sig Rumann) and his wife (Nedda Harrigan); and guests of honor of Chinese nobility, Madame Chung (Pauline Frederick) and her son, Prince Chung (Philip Ahn). The once quite wealthy Chungs are learned to be the only remaining members of twelve generations to possess six of the seven scrolls to be the key to the hidden treasure of Genghis Khan. Later, Colonel Tchernov, demanding to get the scrolls from Prince Chung at gunpoint, is later found dead. Learning the value of the missing scroll, Mr. Moto assists Prince Chung in helping with its whereabouts, tracing it to the antique shop of Mr. Pereira (John Carradine, in fine characterization). The antique dealer soon becomes a murder victim himself before he could reveal to Mr. Moto how he was able to acquire the actual missing scroll. Moto, now in possession of the seventh scroll, must outwit its ringleader, Eric Koerger (Sidney Blackmer), and his henchmen, to prevent all seven scrolls from getting into the wrong hands of treasure hunters who will stop at nothing, including murder, to obtain it.

Naturally, Peter Lorre, the master of many disguises, is the whole show here. Lorre's fine characterization certainly indicates how he was born for the role for which he's letter perfect. The film also finds time for occasional humor, abductions, chases, shootings, fight scenes, as well as surprising elements that classify THANK YOU, MR. MOTO as least typical yet with enough fast-pace entertainment during its 67 minutes to go around. Thomas Beck and Sig Rumann, who previously co-starred in THINK FAST, MR. MOTO, return in different character roles. William Von Brincken (Schneider); John Bleifer (Ivan); and Gino Corrado are others who also appear in the supporting cast.

The possibility of those ranking THANK YOU, MR. MOTO as the best in the series might have been the reason for it to have been the first one chosen over the seven other "Mr Moto" films for its themed subject matter of "Asian Images on Film" on Turner Classic Movies, where it premiered June 10, 2008. For anyone who's yet to see this and/or any other of the Lorre/Moto movie episodes, would have a great opportunity to say "Thank You, Mr. Moto" or 20th Century-Fox Home Entertainment for that matter, after obtaining all eight in the series (1937-1939) available on DVD. Next installment: MR. MOTO'S GAMBLE (1938) (*** scrolls)
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6/10
The tomb of Genghis Khan
kapelusznik1829 September 2015
Warning: Spoilers
****SPOILERS**** International crime fighter Mister Kentaro "Kenny" Moto, Peter Lorre,is on a mission to see that the Chung family heirloom scrolls-all seven of them- stays in the family and not stolen by a gang of thieves to guide them, by putting the scrolls together, to the tomb and treasures, worth up to 10 million in gold and jewelry, of Mongolian chieftain Genghis Khan. It was first that Moto had to deal with Colonel Tchernov,Sig Ruman, who attempted to get Prince Chung,Philip Ahn, to hand the scrolls over to him, by pulling a gun on the Prince, by offing him with a fatal judo chop-off camera-and making it look like he killed himself.

It's then that the late Colonel's wife Madame Tchernov, Nedda Harrigan, had her goons try to get Moto to tell them where the scrolls were or else they'll not only kill him but Prince Chung and his mother Madame Chung, Pauline Frederick, as well. The attempts to murder Mr. Moto by Madame Tchernov's goons fell apart with him outwitting them at every occasion. But it was prince Chung who gave into them when they threatened to murder his mother who in fact was more then willing to die and in fact did then to give up where the scrolls were hidden.

***SPOILERS*** It was when Mister Moto turned Madame Tchernov against her lover the real boss of this criminal operation Herr Koerger, Sidney Blackman, by claiming he was going to drop her for pretty socialite Eleanor Joyce ,Jayne Regan, which caused the two now ex-lovers to turn on each other. That give Moto the chance to gun down Koerger and neutralize, by having her arrested, Madame Tchernov when all the dust cleared. In the end Prince Chung committed suicide for dishonoring his ancestors by revealing where the scrolls were hidden but Mister Moto cleared all that up by burning them in preventing any more people getting killed over them as a favor , that he made while he was still alive, to the late Prince Chung!
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7/10
"Please don't be alarmed. I am only attempting to break into the safe"
bensonmum212 July 2015
Warning: Spoilers
Mr. Moto is in a race with a group of ruthless treasure hunters to find the seven ancient scrolls that show the location of Genghis Khan's grave and the riches contained therein.

Thank You, Mr. Moto is a fast paced, fun entry in the Moto series. The story is interesting throughout, with Moto pulling an excellent trick on the baddies at the very end - some nice writing. Sets, lighting, and cinematography all look great. It's amazing that Norman Foster's Moto films are among his very early directing credits. He does an excellent job for someone so new to the profession. With a couple of exceptions, the acting is quite good. Peter Lorre is as solid as always. The man always gave top notch performances. Other actors with noting in Thank You, Mr. Moto, include: the always enjoyable Sig Ruman in a much to small a role, Sidney Blackmer, and Philip Ahn. However, there were a couple I didn't find as impressive. Jayne Regan just seemed all wrong for the part of the heroine - too wishy-washy. And in the part of Regan's beau, Thomas Beck is too bland.

Overall, a wonderfully entertaining film. I'm rating it a strong 7/10 (and wondering why I didn't go ahead and give it an 8/10).
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8/10
Mr. Moto is Bad to the Bone
masercot22 July 2013
Warning: Spoilers
I do like the "yellow-face" movies of the thirties and forties. Yellow-face is a white man or woman, playing an Asian. Sometimes it is offensive and sometimes it is done with surprising sensitivity.

Thank You, Mr. Moto is one of the latter films. Moto is, on the one hand, capable of cold-blooded murder,if the victim is sufficiently bad. On the other hand, he is capable of giving up a fortune to keep a promise. He can be at once menacing and charming. Very much like the Saint in the first of the Saint series of movies.

Peter Lorre is charismatic in this flick. He, like Karloff, played the role of Asian detective without embarrassing accent, just a little makeup to make the eyes narrower and that's about it.

This is the best one of the Moto series I've seen so far.
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8/10
He's ever so polite but don't mess with Mr. Moto
Paularoc21 March 2013
I thoroughly enjoy B movies series and the Mr. Moto series is among my favorites. This entry involves a treasure map which can be completed when seven ancient scrolls are brought together; this map leads to the tomb and treasure of Genghis Khan. Mr. Moto is a very physical detective and dispatches his adversaries quickly and without compunction. The story is one not only of adventure but honor, courage and loyalty to old friends. The cast is a strong one with Sidney Blackmer as the villain, John Carradine as the oily and dishonest antiques dealer, Pereira (since Pereira is a common Portuguese name and the character calls the men señor, it's likely that the character is Portuguese), Philip Ahn as Moto's good friend Prince Chang and Pauline Frederick as Madame Chang (given her earlier illustrious career in movies and on the stage, it's a bit sad that her last movie was in a B film). As usual, Thomas Beck plays an affable young man. However, he does have quite the screen presence and it's a surprise he didn't have more of a movie career. Richard Loo has an uncredited role as a police officer (although Chinese, Loo very often played Japanese officers and villains in WW II movies) Peter Lorre does a great job as Moto and that with the great production values and solid cast, makes this a movie a winner.
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8/10
Peter Lorre outstanding.
michaelRokeefe23 December 2011
Warning: Spoilers
This is the second of the Moto series based on J.P. Marquand's novels. Mild mannered Japanese investigator Mr. Moto(Lorre)comes into possession of an ancient Chinese scroll. Ruthless fortune hunters want to get their hands on the valuable scroll, because it is the missing piece of a seven scroll set that belongs to a royal Chinese family. The scrolls reveal the location of Genghis Khan's tomb and treasures. Lorre is outstanding in this 67 minute crime adventure. Philip Ahn is faultless as Prince Chung. Thomas Beck and Jayne Regan play a young couple who would like to have the scroll, but at first don't realize how important the piece of art is. This movie was released at Christmas 1937. Other players include: Pauline Frederick, Sidney Blackmer, Sig Ruman and John Carradine.
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High Entertainment
Michael_Elliott6 June 2009
Thank You, Mr. Moto (1937)

*** (out of 4)

Second film in the series has Peter Lorre returning as Mr. Moto. This time out Moto must battle bad guys who will stop at nothing to get the seven pieces of a map that when put together shows an endless treasure of Genghis Khan. This second film is certainly a major step up from the previous film, which in itself was good. This one here takes everything that worked in the first movie and just builds more fire around it and then pours some gas on it for a real explosion of entertainment. The movie runs an extremely fast 67-minutes and there's really nothing dull throughout the film. The story itself is a very interesting and entertaining one as pieces together a treasure map always makes for many enjoyable situations. Lorre really nails his character down perfectly with some great vocabulary and some even better fighting scenes. Even though there weren't as many fights this time around I can't help but get a huge smile when Lorre goes into action. It's also very refreshing to see Moto kill, which is something other stars of this genre wouldn't do in a million years. Moto will even take it a step further and rub the killings in. The supporting cast of Thomas Beck, Pauline Frederick and Sidney Blackmer are all great as well. John Carradine nearly steals the film in his role as a Chinese art dealer. I'm going through the series one by one so I'm not sure if any of them will eventually top this one but fans of the genre will certainly get a kick out of this one.
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