Stella Dallas (1937) - News Poster

(1937)

News

Criterion Collection: Now, Voyager (1942) | Blu-ray Review

It ends with one of cinema’s most quotable lines of dialogue, as a chain-smoking Bette Davis slyly slows a Paul Henreid in his lukewarm wish to pursue a tenuous romance with her Charlotte Vale exclaiming, “Oh Jerry, don’t let’s ask for the moon. We have the stars.” The film, is of course, Now, Voyager (1942), borrowing its title from the Walt Whitman poem “The Untold Want” and adapted from a novel by Olive Higgins Prouty. It is, perhaps, the most quintessential of Bette Davis’ women’s pictures of her studio era days. If Joan Crawford was the star of melodramas as the woman from the wrong side of the tracks, Davis’ early days as leading lady tended towards women who transformed from ugly ducklings to elegant, ‘party favor’ swans (that is before 1950’s All About Eve would resurrect and revamp her screen image forever, equaled perhaps only by
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Melodrama Through The Years: Three Versions of ‘Stella Dallas’

By Jacob Oller

Adaptation theory through three takes on a novel. live Higgins Prouty’s 1922 novel Stella Dallas became one of the first radio soap operas, creating the melodramatic form that would continue on through TV and film. Most directly, it inspired three adaptations: a silent film in 1925, a Barbara Stanwyck film in 1937, and a 1990 […]

The article Melodrama Through The Years: Three Versions of ‘Stella Dallas’ appeared first on Film School Rejects.
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Four Mother-Daughter Movies Could Dominate Awards Season

Four Mother-Daughter Movies Could Dominate Awards Season
Mother-daughter relationships have always been the stuff of great drama. And the Oscars are no exception. Three decades ago the “Moonstruck” acting duo Olympia Dukakis and Cher both won gold for playing a strong-willed New York Italian mother and her feisty daughter. Six years later, as a mute Scottish teacher and her de facto interpreter in New Zealand, Holly Hunter and Anna Paquin repeated that twofer triumph with Jane Campion’s “The Piano.”

Onscreen mother-daughter conflict has resulted in other dual Academy Award nominations: selfless Barbara Stanwyck tricked Anne Shirley into marrying rich in tearjerker “Stella Dallas” (1937); Meryl Streep’s big mouth inspired a rebellious Julia Roberts in “August: Osage County” (2013); Piper Laurie was literally crucified by Sissy Spacek in “Carrie” (1976). At the start of this decade, Mo’Nique won an Oscar portraying the sexually abusive parent of fellow “Precious” nominee Gabourey Sidibe. Back in 1984, both Shirley MacLaine and
See full article at Indiewire »

Snowed in by Winter Storm Stella? Here Are the Best Shows and Movies to Binge During the Blizzard

Snowed in by Winter Storm Stella? Here Are the Best Shows and Movies to Binge During the Blizzard
If you’re one of the thousands of people who are forced to stay home on Tuesday due to Winter Storm Stella, there is a bright spot amidst all that snow —getting caught up on all the things you’ve been meaning to stream.

If you’re looking for ideas — or just don’t know where to start — we’ve put together a handy guide on the best TV and movies to stream on Netflix, Amazon, iTunes and more. And we’ve broken them down by your moods — from wishing you were on a sunny beach somewhere (then-teenaged Lauren Conrad
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Telluride and Tiff’s Oscar Tea Leaves: How Two Key Festivals Could Predict This Year’s Winners

Telluride and Tiff’s Oscar Tea Leaves: How Two Key Festivals Could Predict This Year’s Winners
Telluride Film Festival programmers Tom Luddy and Julie Huntsinger pride themselves on curating the cream of the Hollywood crop, which has included Best Picture Oscar-winners “The King’s Speech,” “Slumdog Millionaire,” “Argo,” and “12 Years a Slave.”

However, even a Telluride hit needs amplification from noisy Toronto as they head into awards season.

Launched at Venice and Telluride, Lionsgate’s “La La Land” has propelled Emma Stone and, possibly, costar Ryan Gosling into awards contention. How the audacious musical fares with critics and audiences will impact how far it goes with the Academy, who will give “Whiplash” nominee Damien Chazelle points for ambition and a relatable showbiz story. This film boasts passionate supporters, while many others don’t get the movie at all. The larger media presence in Toronto and New York will continue to ripple out and build must-see for the movie. So far I am discerning a slight generational divide,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Telluride and Tiff’s Oscar Tea Leaves: How Two Key Festivals Could Predict This Year’s Winners

  • Indiewire
Telluride Film Festival programmers Tom Luddy and Julie Huntsinger pride themselves on curating the cream of the Hollywood crop, which has included Best Picture Oscar-winners “The King’s Speech,” “Slumdog Millionaire,” “Argo,” and “12 Years a Slave.”

However, even a Telluride hit needs amplification from noisy Toronto as they head into awards season.

Launched at Venice and Telluride, Lionsgate’s “La La Land” has propelled Emma Stone and, possibly, costar Ryan Gosling into awards contention. How the audacious musical fares with critics and audiences will impact how far it goes with the Academy, who will give “Whiplash” nominee Damien Chazelle points for ambition and a relatable showbiz story. This film boasts passionate supporters, while many others don’t get the movie at all. The larger media presence in Toronto and New York will continue to ripple out and build must-see for the movie. So far I am discerning a slight generational divide,
See full article at Indiewire »

Hippfest 2016 to open with Soviet classic Earth by Jennie Kermode - 2016-02-09 18:28:04

Going live at the Hippfest launch Photo: Lisa Evans

The full programme for Hippfest 2016 was revealed today at the Hippodrome Cinema in Bo'ness, Scotland's oldest purpose-built cinema. There was music from Herschel-36 and Jane Gardner, who are composing new live scores for festival films, and it was announced that the opening film will be 1930 Soviet classic Earth, rarely seen but widely considered to be one of the best films ever made.

Wunder Der Schöpfung

The festival, which secured funding in November, is the country's only event dedicated entirely to silent film. It will close with the original Stella Dallas, starring Belle Bennett, which was later reworked as a vehicle for Barbara Stanwyck. Also in the programme are a Laurel and Hardy triple bill, a Buster Keaton short whose ending has only just been discovered after being lost for decades, and 1925 German documentary Wunder Der Schöpfung (literally 'the miracle of creation'
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Day of the Dead List: Top 10 Most Piercingly Horrific Movie Screams

Top Ten Scream Queens: Barbara Steele, who both emitted screams and made others do same, is in a category of her own. Top Ten Scream Queens Halloween is over until next year, but the equally bewitching Day of the Dead is just around the corner. So, dead or alive, here's my revised and expanded list of cinema's Top Ten Scream Queens. This highly personal compilation is based on how memorable – as opposed to how loud or how frequent – were the screams. That's the key reason you won't find listed below actresses featured in gory slasher films. After all, the screams – and just about everything else in such movies – are as meaningless as their plots. You also won't find any screaming guys (i.e., Scream Kings) on the list below even though I've got absolutely nothing against guys who scream in horror, whether in movies or in life. There are
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Academy Awards Film Series: From Class Distinctions to Incest - Adult Themes in First-Rate, Long-Thought-Lost Drama

'Sorrell and Son' with H.B. Warner and Alice Joyce. 'Sorrell and Son' 1927 movie: Long thought lost, surprisingly effective father-love melodrama stars a superlative H.B. Warner Partially shot on location in England and produced independently by director Herbert Brenon at Joseph M. Schenck's United Artists, the 1927 Sorrell and Son is a skillful melodrama about paternal devotion in the face of both personal and social adversity. This long-thought-lost version of Warwick Deeping's 1925 bestseller benefits greatly from the veteran Brenon's assured direction, deservedly shortlisted in the first year of the Academy Awards.* Crucial to the film's effectiveness, however, is the portrayal of its central character, a war-scarred Englishman who sacrifices it all for the happiness of his son. Luckily, the London-born H.B. Warner, best remembered for playing Jesus Christ in another 1927 release, Cecil B. DeMille's The King of Kings, is the embodiment of honesty, selflessness, and devotion. Less is
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Wright and Goldwyn Have an Ugly Parting of the Ways; Brando (More or Less) Comes to the Rescue

Teresa Wright-Samuel Goldwyn association comes to a nasty end (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt': Alfred Hitchcock Heroine in His Favorite Film.") Whether or not because she was aware that Enchantment wasn't going to be the hit she needed – or perhaps some other disagreement with Samuel Goldwyn or personal issue with husband Niven BuschTeresa Wright, claiming illness, refused to go to New York City to promote the film. (Top image: Teresa Wright in a publicity shot for The Men.) Goldwyn had previously announced that Wright, whose contract still had another four and half years to run, was to star in a film version of J.D. Salinger's 1948 short story "Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut." Instead, he unceremoniously – and quite publicly – fired her.[1] The Goldwyn organization issued a statement, explaining that besides refusing the assignment to travel to New York to help generate pre-opening publicity for Enchantment,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Why Sam Goldwyn Jr Was Important

Why Sam Goldwyn Jr Was Important
His dad was one of Hollywood’s founding fathers. If there is something that Samuel Goldwyn Jr should be remembered for following his death on Friday night, it’s this, according to Tom Rothman: “For the 20 or so years before Disney put money in Miramax or we started Fox Searchlight with NewsCorp money and other studios got in the game, the independent film business really began with Sam in the late 70s.” Rothman, a lawyer in New York who repped Jim Jarmusch when he made the deal with Goldwyn Jr for Stranger Than Paradise, was hired by Goldwyn Jr to become president of The Goldwyn Company before moving on to Fox where he became the first president of Fox Searchlight.

“People forget what a seminal figure Sam was, and how many filmmakers broke through because of him,” Rothman said. “There was Kenneth Branagh, Anthony Minghella, Ang Lee, David Lynch and John Sayles.
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Board of Governors Bias: Bacall, Garbo Among Rare Female Winners of Academy's Honorary Award

Honorary Oscars have bypassed women: Angela Lansbury, Lauren Bacall among rare exceptions (photo: 2013 Honorary Oscar winner Angela Lansbury and Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award winner Angelina Jolie) September 4, 2014, Introduction: This four-part article on the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Honorary Awards and the dearth of female Honorary Oscar winners was originally posted in February 2007. The article was updated in February 2012 and fully revised before its republication today. All outdated figures regarding the Honorary Oscars and the Academy's other Special Awards have been "scratched out," with the updated numbers and related information inserted below each affected paragraph or text section. See also "Honorary Oscars 2014 addendum" at the bottom of this post. At the 1936 Academy Awards ceremony, groundbreaking film pioneer D.W. Griffith, by then a veteran with more than 500 shorts and features to his credit — among them the epoch-making The Birth of a Nation and Intolerance — became the first individual to
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Voice of Disney's Pinocchio, Actor Dick Jones, Dies

Voice of Disney's Pinocchio, Actor Dick Jones, Dies
The title star's conscience may have been Jiminy Cricket, but his voice in the 1940 Walt Disney animated feature Pinocchio belonged to 10-year-old Dick Jones, who made millions of fellow youngsters cry when his screen character was reunited with his father and then turned into a real boy. Jones, not only the voice of Pinocchio but the veteran of 40 movies before he landed that role, died Monday night after a fall in his San Fernando Valley, California, home, his son, Rick Jones, told the Los Angeles Times. He was 87. Inducted in 2000 as a "Disney Legend" at the studio that produced the beloved movie (which,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

If You Could be Adopted by a Mother in the Movies, Who Would It Be?

If You Could be Adopted by a Mother in the Movies, Who Would It Be?
My mother would have preferred a mother more like Beulah Bondi in "It’s a Wonderful Life." My daughters would have preferred a mother more like Susan Sarandon in "Little Women" or Natasha Richardson in "The Parent Trap." Much as I love Barbara Stanwyck in "Stella Dallas" and Claudia McNeil in "Raisin in the Sun," I would have preferred a mother more like Frances McDormand in "Almost Famous" or like Marcia Gay Harden in "Whip It" than the one I had and loved and was more like Debbie Reynolds in Albert Brooks’ "Mother." I’ve been reading Richard Corliss’ "Mom in the Movies," a sprightly survey of cinemamas, as though it were a catalogue of mail-order moms. Read more here.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Movie Poster of the Week: The Posters of Barbara Stanwyck

  • MUBI
Above: Us poster for Forbidden (Frank Capra, USA, 1932)

In honor of the month-long retrospective of the films of the great Barbara Stanwyck starting today at Film Forum in New York, I thought I’d select my favorite Stanwyck posters. Brooklyn-born Ruby Catherine Stevens made 85 films over 37 years in Hollywood so there is an awful lot to choose from. But the remarkable thing about looking back at these posters is how artists seemed to have had a hard time capturing her likeness. The poster for one of her earliest films, Capra’s 1932 Forbidden, above, captures her beautifully, but the poster for Stella Dallas (1937), her first Oscar-nominated role (she never won, shockingly), seems to be of a different actress entirely. As for the sexed-up illustration on the flyer for The Bitter Tea of General Yen (1933), in that she looks more like Jean Harlow. Some of my favorite posters for her films are the Swedish and Danish designs,
See full article at MUBI »

TV on Tap: "Glee" Grabs Katey Sagal, Comedy Central takes the Late Night Crown and "Mad Men" Style Returns to Sunday Nights

Angela Lansbury talking show tunes!

That's why you should be excited about a new season of Michael Feinstein's American Songbook.

News

FX has issued an apology to fans of The Americans who found their DVR recordings cut off early. The episode ran for 67 minutes but listings had the run time going for an hour, meaning many viewers missed vital scenes. FX is putting the full episode online for viewers to catch up.

The next target for Adult Swim — 80s detective shows. Deadline reports that the late night block has ordered a new live action series, Hole to Hole, that will parody 80s detective shows.

Since I find Artie one of the more toxic characters on Glee, I didn't expect to be excited at the thought of meeting his mother, but she's going to be played by Katey Sagal (who was once one of Bette Midler's Harlettes) which suddenly has
See full article at The Backlot »

Cher Shares the Scoop on Her New TCM Co-hosting Gig

When it comes to old movies, don't mess with Cher. The Oscar-winning uber-diva and passionate film buff is helping Turner Classic Movies launch its new weekly film series Friday Night Spotlight (8/7c), which kicks off this week. Each month will showcase a different theme and guest co-host. First up is A Woman's World: The Defining Era of Women in Film, a collection of 17 classic movies — handpicked by Cher — that illustrates the evolving roles of women from the late 1930s to the early 1950s. Among them: Stella Dallas, Mildred Pierce, Bachelor Mother, So Proudly We Hail, The Devil in Miss Jones and the 1946 Best Picture Oscar winner The Best Years of Our Lives. (For a full list go to tcm.com). Cher and TCM host Robert Osborne will talk shop and intro the films, which air in four categories — Motherhood (April 5), War Effort and the Homefront (April 12), Working Women (April
See full article at TVGuide - Breaking News »

Cher to Kick Off TCM’s New Friday Night Spotlight – A Woman’s World: The Defining Era of Women In Film

Cher, the Oscar®, Emmy®, Grammy®, Cannes Film Festival and three-time Golden Globe® award winner is set to be the first host of Friday Night Spotlight, a brand new film showcase launching April 5 on Turner Classic Movies (TCM). TCM host Robert Osborne will join Cher to kick off the franchise with A Woman’s World: The Defining Era of Women in Film, a collection of 17 films handpicked by Cher to illustrate the evolving roles of women from the late 1930s to the early ’50s. Each month thereafter, Friday Night Spotlight will feature a celebrity or expert host who will take viewers through a collection of films focusing on a specific topic.

A Woman’s World: The Defining Era of Women in Film will start Friday, April 5, at 8 p.m. (Et) with Cher and Osborne hosting a night of movies focusing on motherhood, beginning with Joan Crawford’s Oscar®-winning performance in
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

TCM Offers Ultimate Studio Tour With 2013 Edition Of 31 Days Of Oscar; The Academy Awards February 24th

As the Academy celebrates 85 years of great films at the Oscars on February 24th, Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is set to take movie fans on the ultimate studio tour with the 2013 edition of 31 Days Of Oscar®. Under the theme Oscar by Studio, the network will present a slate of more than 350 movies grouped according to the studios that produced or released them. And as always, every film presented during 31 Days Of Oscar is an Academy Award® nominee or winner, making this annual event one of the most anticipated on any movie lover’s calendar.

As part of the network’s month-long celebration, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has graciously provided the original Academy Awards® radio broadcasts from 1930-1952. Specially chosen clips from the radio archives will be featured throughout TCM’s 31 Days Of Oscar website.

Hollywood was built upon the studio system, which saw nearly ever aspect
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Frederica Sagor Pt.3: The Way Of All Flesh Plagiarism

Frederica Sagor Pt.2: Women Screenwriters in 1920s Hollywood [Photo: Emil Jannings in The Way of All Flesh.] Frederica Sagor's reported final Hollywood screen credit was the scenario for the 1928 slapstick comedy The Farmer's Daughter, directed by Arthur Rosson at Fox. Marjorie Beebe, previously featured in several comedy shorts, had the title role (no relation to Loretta Young's 1947 Oscar-winning Congresswoman-to-be). In her book, Sagor says she was paid $750 a week (approx. $9,700 today) to write the story for this programmer — one she hated — about rural lovers and piles of manure. The previous year, Sagor had married screenwriter Ernest Maas, who held an executive post at Fox. In her autobiography, she states that the couple wrote a story named Beefsteak Joe, inspired by the life of Maas' father, that was misappropriated by Paramount and released as The Way of All Flesh. Directed by Gone with the Wind's Victor Fleming, the now-lost melodrama — Madame X meets Stella Dallas in
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed