Bulldog Drummond Escapes (1937) Poster

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Solid Low-Budget Feature With Milland As An Interesting 'Bulldog'
Snow Leopard7 June 2005
This is a solid low-budget feature that delivers the main things you hope for in a 'Bulldog Drummond' movie. It has good action, a plot involving a heroine in distress and some crafty villains, and a confident, good-natured hero played here by Ray Milland. All of the actors who portrayed Drummond gave the movies their own feel, but Milland, like most of them, gives the character the right balance of energy and British poise, while putting his own style into the role as well.

The story is set up by an odd encounter between Drummond and Phyllis (Heather Angel) that leads to an involved sequence of events, with Drummond determined to find out exactly what dangers Phyllis is facing, at times even having to oppose his friend Colonel Neilson. The story moves at a good pace, moving quickly from one predicament to the next. There are times when it doesn't quite fit together smoothly, and with even better writing and editing it could have been even more effective, but the basic idea works pretty well.

Heather Angel makes a good Phyllis, winning and energetic. It's interesting to see her in this early Drummond episode, since she later came back to play Phyllis after the character was played by other actresses for the next few features. Neilson is not given a particularly large role here, but the rest of the usual crowd is present, with E.E. Clive as the resourceful Tenny and Reginald Denny as the befuddled but helpful Algy.

Porter Hall also helps out, with one of his many good character performances as Drummond's slippery opponent. The low budget look is helped by having most of the action take place at night and/or in darkened settings, giving it a decent atmosphere despite the lack of detail. It makes for a solid feature that works well enough as light entertainment.
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Worth catching this Bulldog !
moviestore-13 December 2004
I was very pleasantly surprised by this racy little number,available in the UK on one DVD with two other movies from the same series.A simple but effective plot and some good stand out action scenes,pretty well mounted for a 'programmer'.Bulldog Drummond was served better by these movies than Dick Barton fared in the Hammer productions that came a dozen or so years later.Well worth watching,with a nice late thirties flavour,and far superior to the later Richard Johnson attempts at the character.Maybe its time for a resurgence of interest in Bulldog Drummond !! Ray Milland is a suave hero,and Heather Angel a pert heroine.When major stardom priced Ray Milland out of the series,John Howard played the part with equal charm.
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First in a series of excellent films
Barney Bat18 May 2001
Warning: Spoilers
The 1937-1938 series of Bulldog Drummond films released by Paramount, starring first Ray Milland, then John Howard as Captain Hugh C. Drummond, and based on the classic mystery/adventure novels by H. C. "Sapper" McNeile, are first-rate mysteries, and BULLDOG DRUMMOND ESCAPES is a worthy series opener. The whole series (composed of eight films) captures the spirit of the books much more than the rather boring Ronald Colman film made in 1929, which is, for some reason, ridiculously overrated by critics, who, at the same time, dismiss the Milland-Howard films as mediocre programmers. The Colman film put the emphasis on the love story, which is only subsidary in the books, had little or no action, and neglected to give any sense of real menace to the villains. The Paramount series, on the other hand, kept the love interest subsidiary, were full of edge-of-your-seat action, and included first-class villain actors as menaces in the various films, such as J. Carrol Naish, Eduardo Cianelli, Porter Hall, and Leo G. Carrol I really can't talk about the plot of this or any other series entry, as that would constitute a "spoiler" by IMDB standards, but suffice it to say that it is rather loosely based on BULLDOG DRUMMOND, the first of Sapper's books. Ray Milland is Drummond, and an excellent one, but he was too big a star to remain tied to one character for more than one movie, so John Howard took over for the subsequent seven films. Sir Guy Standing, who plays Colonel Neilson, the ever-flustered Scotland Yard man who would like to solve his cases without Drummond bothering him, also did only this one film, the role being taken for the next three by John Barrymore, and for the final four by H. B. Warner. Heather Angel plays the heroine, Phyllis Clavering, in this one and in the final four, while Louise Campbell is Phyllis in the middle three. Reginald Denny is Drummond's loyal but not-too-bright pal Algy Longworth, and repeats his role in all the other films in the series. E.E. Clive is Drummond's indispensible and imperturable valet Tenny (inexplicably changed from Denny in the books). Clive also kept his role throughout the entire series. So, anyone who is a fan of the Drummond books, should, if they want to see the best screen treatment of their hero, check out these films and ignore the abstracted praises of the Colman film.
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6/10
"But, ...., you'll find a crime or invent one before the night's over."
classicsoncall18 January 2006
Warning: Spoilers
For my first introduction to the Bulldog Drummond franchise, I must say I was rather pleasantly entertained. The film is decidedly played in a much lighter vein than the Charlie Chan stories of the same era, and with a cast of characters that complement each other nicely. Captain Hugh "Bulldog" Drummond (Ray Milland) however is not without his shortcomings as a detective, as he gets blind sided more than once and rescues the wrong girl before finally resolving the mystery.

In retrospect, the set up is one of the bigger plot holes in the movie. Miss Phyllis Clavering (Heather Angel) hijacks Drummond's auto in the middle of nowhere, only to return to the Greystone estate where she's being held captive. There we're introduced to a villainous cast of characters headed by Norman Merridew (Porter Hall), who masterminds a counterfeiting scheme following the murder of Miss Clavering's brother.

For his part, Drummond is aided by hapless partner Algy Longworth (Reginald Denny), and Scotland Yard Commissioner Sir Reginald Nielson (Guy Standing). However it's Drummond's butler Tenny (E.E. Clive) who almost steals the show as the deadpan foil for his master, getting him out of more than one scrape before it's over. His best effort is when he nonchalantly drags a body in a blanket to Drummond's closet as if it were a routine occurrence.

Pay attention to a conversation between Phyllis and Drummond when she describes the letter she found in the garden. She states that it was blurry and covered in mud making it hard to read. Earlier however, when we see that same letter switched to prevent it from reaching Colonel Nielson, it appeared in perfect condition.

There's a running gag that gets a bit overdone regarding Algy's first encounter with fatherhood. He's constantly thwarted trying to get in touch with the hospital to find out what's happening. Of course everything works out well, as the old boy is rewarded with a son.

All in all, "Bulldog Drummond Escapes" is a fun story, complete with clever word play, the old shoes behind the curtain trick, a lights out gimmick and the advantage between good and bad guys shared equally. Drummond even gets the girl in the end, planning marriage as it were, though I understand other adventures stood in the way before that happened. I'm inclined to check them out based on this introduction to the series.
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Great fun as a Post WWI mystery: good acting, script and period commentary
spcummings4 January 2004
The basic review is spot on. This is a fun movie. Neither deep nor meaningful, but it is a good romp in a Post WWI England. Enjoyed it with my family. Three generations of my family stuck with it until the end, and all enjoyed it. The cinematography, with fog and lighting adds nicely to the suspense. It is a great look, though typically romanticized or glossy, at the morays and social structure of post WWI British society. Although totally predictable in plot, the dialog and characters made for a fun hour plus at the movies. Not a must in any DVD library, but when on sale, a worthwhile addition as the price of a single ticket.
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6/10
Charming English adventure
djensen119 March 2005
Ray Milland kicks off the 1937-38 series of films about the intrepid Captain Hugh "Bulldog" Drummond with style. Drummond encounters a young woman on the road who pinches his car and leaves him stranded, but not for long. Soon, he's embroiled in a family squabble over inheritance and paranoid delusions. Pal Algy and valet Tenny try to help Drummond prove the girl is not loony and sort out who the baddies are. The banter is funny and lively and the acting is better than usual for the period, especially Milland, who unfortunately immediately left the role for bigger and better ones. For those keeping score, this is when Drummond meets Phyllis, and Algy is worried about missing the birth of his baby.
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6/10
worth watching for Heather Angel
kidboots27 December 2007
Warning: Spoilers
I have seen a few of these films and for me there is usually too much "comedy" from Reginald Denny that detracts from the action. Saying that, in my opinion "Bulldog Drummond Escapes" is one of the best entries - everything works well, and comedy is kept to a minimum.

Ray Milland is great as the debonair Drummond. He makes a mad dash to London to see Algy (Reginald Denny's comedy is kept under reins). From the moment Heather Angel comes into it your attention is rivetted to her.

Heather Angel was an English actress, who appeared in a couple of Alfred Hitchcock films ("Suspicion" (1941) and "Lifeboat" (1944)). She was obviously popular in the Bulldog Drummond series as she appeared in several of them.

Drummond is driving to Headquarters when he is accosted by Phyliss Clavering (Heather Angel) running onto the road and fainting (or pretending to). When he goes to the aid of a man calling for help Phyliss takes his car and drives home. It turns out she is being imprisoned at Greystone manor. She leaves her purse in Drummond's car to force him to visit Greystone manor to return her things. Ingeniously she leaves him a message (in the inside of his hat) so he realises something fishy is going on.

Phyliss is not a simpering heroine, she is a real go-getter. A lot of the smart ways she goes about trying to outwit her scheming relatives - you just have to watch the movie.

E.E. Clive plays the butler "Tenny" who more than keeps up with Drummond.
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7/10
For the type of film it is, it's very, very good
MartinHafer9 February 2007
Warning: Spoilers
The 1930s and 40s saw many B-movie series detective films such as Charlie Chan, Sherlock Holmes, The Saint as well as Bulldog Drummond. Oddly, however, the Drummond films were even more prone than most of these films to change leading men. Sure, there were several Charlie Chans, but that was because Warner Olland and Sidney Toler died and had to be replaced. But with the Drummond series, many actors played the lead in only one film--and this is true here, as Ray Milland takes his lone stab at being the title character. While he's pretty good, he's really overshadowed by his supporting cast--and this isn't a bad thing at all. In fact, the overall plot and Milland, while pretty good, are probably the weakest points in the film.

What I loved were the supporting cast and how their characters were written. In particular, I loved Drummond's smart-alleck butler--his lines were very funny and he was a very able assistant. In addition, I REALLY loved the leading lady because for once, she was not a stupid or helpless victim (which is usually the case in the films). Again and again, she behaves very smartly and I couldn't help but admire the film for this. Here are some examples:

When Drummond is fighting with a bad guy, she does NOT just stand there with her mouth wide open doing nothing (the standard response in this type of film), but he shoots or smashes the bad guy over the head!

When they try to drug her, she later spits out the pill and beats the lady taking care of her! Definitely, this dame is an action hero!

When she knocks out a bad guy, she actually stops to pick up and use his gun! In so many films, they knock out a baddie and leave the gun right there--a cliché I truly hate!

In addition to this wonderful woman (who Drummond is smitten with--probably due to her actions), the rest of the cast is excellent. They really help to raise an ordinary film to must-see status for fans of the status.
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A fine Bulldog
oparser17 January 2011
Mix a cup of Sherlock Holmes with a quarter of James Bond, add plenty of low budget adventures, some comedy gags, a pinch of romance, the language and the attire from the Thirties, shake well, and you'll have Bulldog Drummond: a bunch of pre-war B-movies, if you will, yet with some intriguing elements and entertaining moments. "Bulldog Drummond Escapes" is one of the three "Bulldog Drummond" productions of 1937, and one of the high points in the series in my view.

A few words about Captain Hugh "Bulldog" Drummond for those who do not know him yet: charming and gentlemanly, but a man of action when needed, he is a former WWI British officer who spends his spare time helping Scotland Yard solve intricate cases. "Bulldog" is accompanied by deadpan, witty and vaguely surreal butler Tenny (my favourite character) and by useless, dumb friend Algy (a downer, usually unfunny), and is constantly on the verge of marrying his fiancée Phyllis (adventures will happen and delay the marriage, naturally). All these fictional characters were created by "Sapper", nom de plume of Herman Cyril McNeile, and continued by Gerard Fairlie after McNeile's death -their novels inspired more than twenty motion pictures, many of them in the Thirties.

Similarly to Sherlock Holmes and James Bond, the Bulldog Drummond title hero has been played, over time, by several actors, who gave a different flavour to each episode. In this instalment of the series, which tells of Captain Drummond trying to save a beautiful heiress in distress (played by Heather Angel), the leading man is Ray Milland, a young, bright British actor -a few years later, he won an Academy Award for Best Actor in Billy Wilder's "The Best Weekend". Ray Milland's Bulldog Drummond is charming and funnily flamboyant, but not as clever as he is supposed to be, so the mystery often steers to lighter tones and to comedy.

The result, however, is fast paced and involving, while the unfunny gags are kept to a minimum. "Bulldog Drummond Escapes" is no cinematic masterpiece, but it is enjoyable if you like the genre and if you concede to stereotyped characters and some holes in the plot.

Like other movies from that age, this old flick shows the signs of time, such as scratchy sound and random vertical lines. On the other hand, it is in the public domain, so you can watch it for free on the Internet, if you want.
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5/10
What was it they were doing, exactly?
Hitchcoc21 June 2006
As with most of the items in this series, one must put aside a great deal of incredulity. There are far too many coincidences and events dependent on the victim, for the bad guys to be as successful as they are. That said, there is a great deal of byplay among the principles, including the police department and others makes it a good deal of fun. The thing that really stretches things is that the young woman whom we focus on is semi-conscious much of the time and participate a bit too much in the plot to conceal her. There are, however, so many opportunities to escape or to get help, the ultimate rescue seems a little unnecessary. Ray Milland as Drummond is quite good. I always found him unflappable in his many portrayals (even the Hitchcock classic). He has suavity down to a science. The byplay with the butler is quite delightful. I'm still not sure why they were hanging on to this girl (she seemed like excess baggage) and what the mystery was, but I still had a fine time. I have six of these films and look forward to the next one.
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6/10
"If you're considering her as a possible mother for your children, I'd be awfully careful old boy."
utgard148 June 2015
Ray Milland's only outing as Bulldog Drummond is a pretty good start to Paramount's series. The story is about Drummond trying to help a woman who's being kept prisoner by her nefarious guardian at the ominously-named Greystone Manor. There's also a subplot about Drummond's right-hand man Algy being a nervous wreck waiting on his wife to give birth. Milland makes for a charming and lively Bulldog Drummond. He was one of three actors to play the character in 1937 alone and, for my money, he was better than the other two. Reginald Denny and E.E. Clive offer fun support. Lovely Heather Angel plays the heiress and has a nice playful chemistry with Milland. She's also something of a tough cookie, helping fight the bad guys instead of just standing around doing nothing. The rest of the cast features fine actors like Porter Hall, Walter Kingsford, Fay Holden, and Guy Standing. This was Standing's final movie, dying from a rattlesnake bite (!) a month after this was released. The Bulldog Drummond series wasn't one of my favorites of the many detective film series that littered the '30s & '40s but I have liked many of them. This one is particularly enjoyable with lots of humor and some nice foggy atmosphere. Short runtime and good pace also help.
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6/10
Ray Milland as Bulldog
blanche-27 June 2015
Bulldog Drummond is supposedly the inspiration for James Bond. I don't see it, but Ben Mankiewicz gets a lot wrong. Amazing that TCM doesn't have a fact-checker. In truth, Ian Fleming said 007 was "Drummond above the waist and Mickey Spillane below."

This 1937 film stars Ray Milland, who only played Bulldog once. Someone on this board wrote that this film was only a B film, and wasn't Ray Milland a big star at one time? As if his career was on the decline. Actually it was just starting, and while I never thought of him as a superstar, he did come up the ranks after this.

In this film, Captain Hugh 'Bulldog' Drummond returns to England in his plane. Driving home, a young woman (Heather Angel) lands in front of his car. He doesn't hit her, but she falls.

He is attempting to revive her when he hears a shout and gunshots in the woods. He leaves her for a minute, and the woman jumps in his car and leaves.

She's left her purse and handkerchief in the car, so he goes to her home, Greystone. She asks him to help her as she is being kept prisoner there.

Meanwhile, Bulldog's pal Algy is about to become a father for the first time and is going crazy with worry in the hospital. Guy Standing is the inspector, and when he hears from Bulldog, he tells him to leave town. The Inspector is on vacation and doesn't want to get involved in one of Bulldog's murders.

Lots of fun, with Ray Milland a charming Drummond, very attractive, and very smooth. I would have loved to see him in more than just this Drummond film.

Many actors have played Bulldog, including Carlyle Blackwood in the silents, Richard Johnson, Walter Pidgeon, Robert Beatty, Tom Conway, Ron Randell, John Howard (who played the role 7 times), Ronald Colman, Athol Fleming, Ralph Richardson, Kevin McKenna, and Jack Buchanan. Whew.

Actually, the film The Man Who Knew Too Much was a Drummond story adapted by Hitchcock.

It's interesting that so many characters were inspired by Sherlock Holmes. Like Sherlock, Bulldog has a sidekick and a nemesis (in the books), Carl Peterson.

Looking forward to seeing more of the films on TCM.
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7/10
Decent inter-war drama
Tweekums27 February 2014
Warning: Spoilers
Upon returning to England protagonist Hugh 'Bulldog' Drummond sets off for his home in the country. When he is nearly there he almost hits a woman with his car; she apparently faints and he puts her in his car. He then hears gunshots and while he investigates the woman drives off in his car! She doesn't get far though and the car is found by Drummond's butler, Tenny. Her abandoned purse leads them to the house of Norman Merridew where he in informed that the woman, Phyllis Clavering, is being treated for her delusions… she believes Merridew killed her brother and is plotting to steal her inheritance. Drummond is inclined to believe that she is far from delusional and sets out to rescue her and foil the dastardly Merridew's plans with the help of his friend Algy and Tenny. If that wasn't enough excitement Algy is due to become a father at any moment and is desperate to find out if his wife has given birth and if so whether it is a boy or a girl.

As this was my introduction to the world of Bulldog Drummond I can't say how it compares to others in the series or whether it captures the spirit of the books… however I can say it was rather enjoyable. There was plenty of drama and the sort of action that can be enjoyed by fans of adventure whatever their age. There were also a good number of laughs to be had; mostly from Algy and Tenny. Ray Milland puts in a decent performance as Drummond although at times his character doesn't seem to be taking the situation as seriously as one might expect. Heather Angel does a great job as Phyllis; vulnerable at times but also showing believable ingenuity at others. The rest of the cast was solid enough… especially Porter Hall… with a beard like that he had to be a rotter! Overall I'd certainly recommend this to anybody who doesn't think action requires a high body count and exploding helicopters!
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6/10
Needs Some Rescuing
bkoganbing9 January 2011
Warning: Spoilers
The title of Bulldog Drummond escapes is certainly misnomer. Not only does Ray Milland as Bulldog Drummond not escape, but he needs a bit of rescuing before the film is over.

Adventure just seems to find Bulldog Drummond in a lot of films including this one. He's just driving along when he stops to avoid hitting Heather Angel out on the road. Then Milland hears some shots and goes to investigate, when he comes back she and his car are gone. When the car is recovered from a ditch, she's conveniently left a handkerchief and calling card. Of course Milland is convinced she needs rescuing, though police inspector Guy Standing is not convinced at all, in fact he acts rather obtuse about it.

Of course this Angel has fallen into the hands of a gang counterfeiters and cutthroats led by Porter Hall. Milland does his best, but does require help before the film is over.

Reginald Denny and E.E. Clive are also on hand as Drummond's silly pal Algy who isn't quite sure how he became a father and E.E. Clive his all knowing butler. Denny's character is more silly than amusing.

Milland is fine, but this film is sure not up to either of the Ronald Colman films.
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6/10
Ray Milland's One Film as Bulldog Drummond
robert-temple-131 March 2008
Three Bulldog Drummond films were made in 1937 in quick succession, this being the first, and the only one starring Ray Milland as Drummond. It was the eighth Drummond film to be made. It came out in April, 'Bulldog Drummond at Bay' came out in July, and 'Bulldog Drummond Comes Back' came out in September. Each had a different leading man, the next two in succession being John Lodge and John Howard. In this one, the young Ray Milland was amusing and engaging, but over-acted in a way which was not helpful. He portrayed the hero as someone with adolescent, almost juvenile, attitudes, thereby turning Drummond into a rather idiotic parody, and making the whole film too much like a comedy, despite its scenes of danger and distress. The producers instantly realized they had made a mistake and had endangered their plans for a series of films, so they sought someone with more gravitas. The next film used John Lodge once. But after that, inspiration finally came in the form of John Howard, who was perfect casting and would go on to make many Drummond films, with just the right combination of gravitas mixed with a residual boyish sense of fun, openness (never Milland's strong point), and solid, sporting good humour. In this film, Phyllis Clavering is introduced for the first time, and inspired casting occurred when Heather Angel played the part. The producers made a big mistake in having Phyllis played for three more films by the boring Louise Campbell, but Heather Angel would reappear the next year five films later (Phyllis does not appear in one of them), and carry on for several films to great effect. Phyllis enters the world of Drummond as a helpless imprisoned maiden in distress, whom he rescues. Eventually she ends up suspended in his arms, kissing him, with marriage beckoning. (As all Drummondonians know, this marriage would be 'interruptus' on numerous future occasions.) Guy Standing is boring as Inspector Nielson in this film, and they got rid of him too. E. E. Clive as Tennie the Butler, and Reginald Denny as Algy are in fine fettle for this episode, and were to grace the series for a long while with their charm and talents. There is a curious scene in this film where the villains are driving through the gates of a great house in a Rolls Royce. This shot is actually cut from the 1929 'Bulldog Drummond' and re-used! Much of this film is spent with Algy Longworth desperately trying to phone the hospital to see if his wife has had her baby yet. In 'Bulldog Drummond Comes Back', he will be desperately trying to make it to that same baby's christening, while Drummond will be desperately trying to marry Phyllis, the villains preventing both of these things. This film is entertaining and lively if one is not fussy, and has humour as well, so it is good viewing. As Tennie the Butler would say: 'That is my thought exactly, Sir.'
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6/10
Solid Six
arfdawg-19 April 2014
Captain High 'Bulldog' Drummond has just returned to England.

As he is driving home in the dark, a young woman jumps out in front of his car.

He misses her, but she falls to the ground.

As he tries to revive her, he hears a shout for help, then gunshots.

As he goes to investigate, the woman drives away with Drummond's car.

He is soon able to trace her to nearby Greystone Manor, and when he goes there to meet her, she urges him to help her get out of a desperate situation.

This is my first Bulldog Drummond movie. I didn't know Ray Miland was the main actor. Wasn't he a great actor at one time? This is a grade B picture that is studio make an watchable. It's just over an hour long.

The best part for me was the first scene where Bulldog flies in from an international trip (he's flying) and customs asks him if he has anything to declare and he says - "no, you can check." Times have changed.

It's a watchable film, as I say and Miland is good.
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6/10
Formulaic and talky but watchable
gridoon202030 May 2012
Warning: Spoilers
An uncommonly young (and handsome) Ray Milland makes a perfectly adequate Bulldog Drummond in his one and only take on the role; some of his line readings are very amusing ("He IS bearded!"). The film itself sticks close to the formula of its predecessors (a young woman in distress, abducted and held against her will, by a smooth-talking villain who is hoping to get rich not so much through her, but through one of her relatives, etc.), except that the woman this time (Heather Angel) is a great proto-feminist heroine, with a knack for knocking bad guys over the head with various objects (she accidentally does this to Drummond himself once!). The film is also a bit too talky, but the cast, both main and supporting, keeps it watchable. **1/2 out of 4.
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6/10
Better than I expected
zboston327 October 2007
Warning: Spoilers
This is by no means a gem of the highest water, but it certainly has some moments of suspense and humor. It's set in one endless foggy night (It's foggy even indoors sometimes.)in England as BD attempts to rescue a damsel in distress. Though clearly shot on sets, the fog and darkness prevent it from looking completely phony.

The actors are good though Ray Milland plays the hero in that manic, bright eyed, and bright teethed mode you see in many 30's movies, and his sidekick, Algy, is a bit in the dimwit mode such as Watson was often portrayed in the Sherlock Holmes films.

However there are a number of amusing dialog scenes between Milland and other in the film so I'd rate it better than an average programmer.
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6/10
Simple, short, amusing, detective mystery.
CelluRob11 January 2020
Ray Milland brings loads of charisma and plucky British spirit to this 1930's tale of espionage and skullduggery. It's a fun, jolly effort as "Bulldog Drummond" attempts to get to the bottom of it all. Sir Guy Standing, Heather Angel and an on-form EE Clive complement this pacy little feature well and at just over the hour, we get plenty of action and quite a bit of humour too.
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5/10
Light and breezy
Leofwine_draca20 September 2019
Warning: Spoilers
BULLDOG DRUMMOND ESCAPES is a serviceable instalment in long-running series based on the books by Sapper. This one is just over an hour long and features future Hollywood great Ray Milland as the intrepid hero. The plot moves along at a fair clip, beginning when Drummond's car is nicked by a beautiful woman. He soon finds himself at a creepy house in the country and at odds with sinister foes. There's plenty of comedy from Drummond's valet Tenny and his pal Algy, and overall this is a light and breezy affair.
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10/10
Tinting along!
JohnHowardReid29 November 2017
Warning: Spoilers
Ray Milland (Bulldog Drummond), Heather Angel (the lady in distress), Sir Guy Standing (commissioner), Reginald Denny (Algy), Porter Hall (Merridew), E.E. Clive (Tenny), Fay Holden (Mrs Seldon), Patrick J. Kelly (Stiles), Guy Kingsford (Stanton), Charles McNaugthton (slow-witted constable), Clyde Cook (second constable), Doris Lloyd (nurse).

Director: JIMMY HOGAN. Screenplay: Edward T. Lowe. Based on the stage play Bulldog Drummond Again by Gerard Fairlea and H.C. "Sapper" McNeile. Photography: Victor Milner. Film editor: William Shea. Art directors: Hans Dreier and Earl Hedrick. Set decorator: A.E. Freudeman. Music director: Boris Morros. Producer: Edward T. Lowe.

COMMENT: The first and best of the 1937-39 Paramount series, smartly paced by Jimmy Hogan, with Ray Milland playing the adventurous hero delightfully tongue-in-cheek to Angel's wanly beautiful heroine, is available on an excellent Critics' Choice DVD on the original green- tinted stock.

Menacing sets and noirish photography really impress.

But of course, my chief reason for adding this excellent DVD to my collection was to revel in its colored tint. I really enjoyed tinted movies, but they were not popular with the majority of suburban picture-goers. They found the tint "distracting" would you believe! Full color was okay. Black-and-white was okay. Sepia was even okay. But a green tint? No way! Too way out! Too unusual! Too uncomfortable!
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Breezy Bulldog
GManfred12 September 2017
The Bulldog Drummond series of films are enjoyable and easy on the IQ. All you have to do is go with the plot and don't ask questions and it's all great fun. This is the first of a newer series (earlier ones starred Ralph Richardson and Ronald Colman) and it stars Ray Milland as a dashing, youthful Bulldog, though in truth, he's a bit over the top with a hyper demeanor and often with a maniacal grin.

The cast makes this entry interesting with Reginald Denny as Algy and E.E. Clive as his butler/backup and Porter Hall against type as the villain. There are plot holes and non sequiturs galore but these are typical of this type of entertainment in the 30's. The most egregious I found is in the beginning the damsel in distress (Heather Angel) steals Drummond's car and drives to the estate ... where she is being held prisoner. Don't ask, just enjoy some mindless fun from Paramount.
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5/10
Ray Milland: Eagle Scout.
rmax3048237 April 2011
Warning: Spoilers
In this modest, unambitious crime mystery, Ray Milland is Bulldog Drummond, an adventurous, thumotic young fellow who looks for crime everywhere he goes and, as Inspector Nielson observes, always seems to find it. I don't see anything special about that. Lots of fictional detectives find crime wherever they go, even when they're trying to get away from it. Can Hercule Poirot escape murder, even when he takes a paddle boat up in the Nile on vacation? No. No, he can't. And look at Inspector Morse. A quiet little college town like Oxford is turned into a charnal house. There should be a big "Second Coming" headline: JESSICA FLETCHER DESTROYS CABOT'S COVE. Let's face facts. These guys are detriments to society. You want to rid the world of crime? It's simple. You just lock up all the detectives. The only fictional detective who ever found himself between cases was Sherlock Holmes, and he had his cocaine to liven up his life.

In this one, which I believe is the only film in which Drummond was played by Milland, the detective has his car stolen by a pretty woman, traces her to a mental institution for the up-trodden, finds she is being held prisoner because of something to do with fake war bonds, enlists the aid of his pal Algie and his butler Tenny, rescues her after many tribulations, and rushes off to get married.

Either Milland or the director, James P. Hogan, made a mistake, I think, in allowing the character of Bulldog Drummond to be played as an eager Eagle Scout. Milland never put such energy into another role. (He was a fine, suave villain in Hitchcock's "Dial M For Murder," by the way.) Here, his eyes bulge, his vocal contours take on the outline of a roller coaster, and overall he's very animated. (Some might call it "overacting.") The rest of the cast go through their B-movie motions, hit their marks, and say what they're supposed to say. The young woman in jeopardy is Heather Angel. She has a great name but little to do. Porter Hall isn't really convincing as the chief heavy. He's not the criminal director of an insane asylum. He's an ordinary guy from Medford -- Medford, Oregon.

The plot has a lot of twists and turns but none are particularly memorable. They've all been used at one time or another in some Charlie Chan movie. Let's see, there is a lot of sneaking around in the shrubbery in the fog, a pistol slowly extrudes from behind a curtain, there's a secret door in the wall that's activated by pressing a button, a body sinks into a dangerous marsh, the hero sneaks into the nest of vipers through a window, a running gag is that poor Algie is about to become a father and continually tries to get to a phone and find out what's happening, Porter Hall fires his pistol holding it chest high and close to his sternum (which I think I prefer to his holding it at arms' length sideways), a couple of constables guarding Milland are served drugged drinks, Milland never loses his fedora or finds his necktie askew.

All in all, a fast-paced, good-natured slog through very familiar territory. It does what it was presumably designed to do -- entertain and distract an audience on a Saturday afternoon in 1937. They had plenty to be distracted from.
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5/10
A Damsel-In-Distress
strong-122-47888512 March 2018
(*Fave movie quote*) - "It takes only one false move to make a man a crook."

Now 80+ years old - "Bulldog Drummond Escapes" is a fairly entertaining crime-investigation drama set in the "damsel-in-distress" mode.

A dashing, young, Ray Milland plays the Captain Hugh "Bulldog" Drummond character with considerable vitality and gung-ho enthusiasm.

Why Milland's character was nicknamed "Bulldog" was never explained - But, I thought that a much more appropriate moniker for this love-struck dude would have been "Puppydog".

With its story's location set out in the foggy, English countryside - It really killed me that as Drummond was driving down a totally deserted road - (Right out of the blue) - A very complicated case for him to solve (literally) fell right into his lap.

All-in-all - This brisk-paced, 65-minute Crime/Drama/Romance was an enjoyable view.
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2/10
Average Crime Film Of The Era
Rainey-Dawn22 January 2017
This is your average crime film of the 1930s. Our "hero" is the gentleman adventurer Bulldog Drummond. I think there are 23 films surrounding this character based on H. C. McNeile books.

In this "episode" Bulldog has to protect a heiress from impending danger of an espionage organization out to get her inheritance.

Really nothing special at all. It's a very average and typical crime film of the 1930s. I think the only people interested are those that are fans of the Bulldog Drummond books and movies. There are better crime films from that time era.

2/10
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