7.8/10
6,654
77 user 39 critic

Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Drama, Musical | 27 May 1933 (USA)
A wealthy composer rescues unemployed Broadway performers with a new play.

Director:

Mervyn LeRoy

Writers:

Erwin S. Gelsey (screenplay) (as Erwin Gelsey), James Seymour (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
Reviews

Watch Now

From $2.99 on Prime Video

ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 win. See more awards »

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Certificate: Passed Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

Chester Kent struggles against time, romance, and a rival's spy to produce spectacular live "prologues" for movie houses.

Director: Lloyd Bacon
Stars: James Cagney, Joan Blondell, Ruby Keeler
42nd Street (1933)
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

A director puts on what may be his last Broadway show and, at the last moment, a naive newcomer has to replace the star.

Director: Lloyd Bacon
Stars: Warner Baxter, Bebe Daniels, George Brent
Comedy | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Romantic antics abound among the guests at a luxury hotel, including a stage director, an eccentric millionaire, and the daughter of a financial backer.

Director: Busby Berkeley
Stars: Dick Powell, Adolphe Menjou, Gloria Stuart
Dames (1934)
Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

A multimillionaire decides to boycott "filthy" forms of entertainment such as Broadway shows.

Directors: Ray Enright, Busby Berkeley
Stars: Joan Blondell, Dick Powell, Ruby Keeler
Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

When two investors inform an opportunistic dancer that they can't fund an elderly stage producer's production, she suggests they get an insurance policy on the producer's life.

Director: Lloyd Bacon
Stars: Dick Powell, Joan Blondell, Glenda Farrell
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

A Parisian tailor finds himself posing as a baron in order to collect a sizeable bill from an aristocrat, only to fall in love with an aloof young princess.

Director: Rouben Mamoulian
Stars: Maurice Chevalier, Jeanette MacDonald, Charles Ruggles
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

In the Gay Nineties, a seductive nightclub singer contends with several suitors, including a jealous escaped convict and a handsome temperance league member.

Director: Lowell Sherman
Stars: Mae West, Cary Grant, Owen Moore
Top Hat (1935)
Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

An American dancer comes to Britain and falls for a model whom he initially annoyed, but she mistakes him for his goofy producer.

Director: Mark Sandrich
Stars: Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Edward Everett Horton
Certificate: Passed Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

Wrongly convicted James Allen serves in the intolerable conditions of a southern chain gang, which later comes back to haunt him.

Director: Mervyn LeRoy
Stars: Paul Muni, Glenda Farrell, Helen Vinson
Swing Time (1936)
Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

A performer and gambler travels to New York City to raise the $25,000 he needs to marry his fiancée, only to become entangled with a beautiful aspiring dancer.

Director: George Stevens
Stars: Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Victor Moore
Biography | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Queen Christina of Sweden is a popular monarch who is loyal to her country. However, when she falls in love with a Spanish envoy, she must choose between the throne and the man she loves.

Director: Rouben Mamoulian
Stars: Greta Garbo, John Gilbert, Ian Keith
Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

An American woman travels to England to seek a divorce from her absentee husband, where she meets - and falls for - a dashing performer.

Director: Mark Sandrich
Stars: Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Alice Brady
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Warren William ... J. Lawrence Bradford
Joan Blondell ... Carol King
Aline MacMahon ... Trixie Lorraine
Ruby Keeler ... Polly Parker
Dick Powell ... Brad Roberts
Guy Kibbee ... Faneul H. Peabody
Ned Sparks ... Barney Hopkins
Ginger Rogers ... Fay Fortune
Edit

Storyline

Chorus girls Polly, Carol and Trixie are ecstatic when they learn that Broadway producer Barney Hopkins is putting on a new show. He promises all of the girls parts in the new show and even hires their neighbor Brad Roberts, an unknown composer, to write some of the music. There's only one problem: he doesn't have the money to bankroll it all. That problem is solved when Brad turns out to be quite rich but he insists that he not perform. When opening night comes, the juvenile lead can't go on forcing Brad to take the stage. He's recognized of course and his upper crust family wants him to quit. When he refuses, they tell him to end his relationship with Polly or face having his income cut off. When Brad's snobbish brother Lawrence mistakes Carol for Polly, the girls decide to have a bit of fun and teach him a lesson. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

REVEL IN THESE MIGHT SPECTACLES -- "The Parade of the Gold Diggers" "The Stairway to the Stars" "The Flower Garden of Girls" "The Ballet of the Snows" "The Dance of the Singing Violins" "The Pageant of the Forgotten Man" See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Musical

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

27 May 1933 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Golddiggers of 1933 See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$433,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$4,800,360

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$7,043,580
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(Turner library print)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

As with 42nd Street (1933), this film was shot with two separate units. Mervyn LeRoy's unit, which handled the non-musical parts of the story, worked on a 30-day schedule from February 16 through March 23, 1933. Busby Berkeley oversaw the shooting of the musical numbers between March 6 and April 13. Sol Polito was the cinematographer for both units, with Sidney Hickox filling in for any schedule conflicts. See more »

Goofs

At 1:18 into film Lawrence (Warren William) is on his bed with an ice pack, Peabody (Guy Kibbee) sitting next to him. Lawrence gets up and undoes the sash of his robe, but in the very next shot the sash is completely tied, as it had been before. See more »

Quotes

Carol King: I'm going to throw them out.
Trixie Lorraine: After what he called you! A parasite. What is a parasite? You'd better resent it.
See more »

Connections

Featured in The Love Goddesses (1965) See more »

Soundtracks

Shadow Waltz
(1933) (uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Lyrics by Al Dubin
Sung by Dick Powell, Ruby Keeler and chorus
Reprised also in the show
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Those Broadway Girls
19 January 2001 | by lugonianSee all my reviews

GOLD DIGGERS OF 1933 (Warner Brothers, 1933), based on the 1919 play by Avery Hopwood, is a worthy follow-up to the recent backstage musical success of "42nd Street" (1933). Previously filmed as a 1923 silent, then an early 1929 musical talkie, "The Golddiggers of Broadway". followed by sequels in name only, "Gold Diggers of 1935, 1937," and "IN Paris," the Hopwood plot was later reworked again by Warners in 1951 in western setting as "Painting the Clouds With Sunshine," with Dennis Morgan, but the 1933 edition, in the opinion of many, is the best of them all. It's one of the few 1930s musicals that can still be seen and appreciated today, thanks to choreographer Busby Berkeley's genius of inventing such remarkable production numbers, and director Mervyn LeRoy's fast-paced story-line.

The plot can be categorized in two parts. PART I: Roommate show girls, Carol (Joan Blondell), Trixie (Aline MacMahon), Polly (Ruby Keeler) and Fay (Ginger Rogers), give up their present jobs in order to appear in Barney Hopkins' (Ned Sparks) latest musical revue, FORGOTTEN MELODY. Barney wants to do a show about the Depression. In the meantime he is introduced to Brad (Dick Powell), an unknown composer, by Polly who loves him. Brad so happens to have the score Barney wants to use for the upcoming show. After rehearsals comes opening night. The juvenile leading man (Clarence Nordstrom) is unable to go on and Brad is chosen to take his place. After the show clicks, Brad and Polly become overnight stars. PART II: Millionaire snob J. Lawrence Bradford (Warren William), and his family attorney, Peabody (Guy Kibbee) arrive in New York from Boston in order to prevent Brad, J. Lawrence's younger brother, from disgracing the family name by appearing in the shows and getting himself mixed up with show girls, who have the reputation of being nothing but "chisslers, parasites and gold diggers." Because Brad wants a career in the theater and to now marry Polly, he refuses to listen to his brother. J. Lawrence decides to break up the relationship by meeting Polly and buying her off, but instead he meets Carol and mistakes her for Polly. Carol and Trixie decide to J. Lawrence and Peabody "for a ride" and "gold dig" their way into their wallets.

Beginning and ending with production numbers, the movie opens with "We're in the Money" sung by Ginger Rogers both in English and in Pig Latin; followed by Dick Powell crooning "The Shadow Waltz" to Ruby Keeler from across her apartment window. Powell then sings the beautiful tune, "I've Got to Sing a Torch Song" while auditioning for Sparks. That song is underscored during the film's love scenes and tender moments. The stage shows include the lively and racy "Pettin' in the Park," followed by chorus girls in hoop skirts playing neon violins to "The Shadow Waltz," ending with the Depression theme, "Remember My Forgotten Man" a dark and moody number with Joan Blondell (wearing tight blouse and skirt)/sung by black singer Etta Moten, underscored in serious tone presenting dough-boy soldiers fighting at the front during World War I, and returning home to the states finding themselves hit by the Depression, becoming homeless and unemployed. Only Berkeley could take a very lively movie and end it like this. Of the four show girls in the story, only Ginger Rogers has little to do. Aline MacMahon and Guy Kibbee make an excellent "odd couple." Powell and Keeler continue to delight with their innocent charm, while sassy Blondell and no nonsense William make go with their love/hate relationship.

While musicals have a reputation for having thin plots and strong production numbers, or visa versa, GOLD DIGGERS OF 1933 is strong on both counts and entertains throughout its full 96 minutes. Mistaken identity plot par excellence make this a breezy and merry affair. There are some Hollywood "in jokes" here that some viewers might not understand, with pre-production code risqué dialogue and scenes that will open many eyes before beginning to chuckle with amusement. Look for it. Excellent score by Harry Warren and Al Dubin, with choreography by Busby Berkeley, make this one movie musical of the 1930s highly recommended to be seen and enjoyed, if above all else. (****)


21 of 24 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 77 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending Movies With Prime Video

Enjoy a night in with these popular movies available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed