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The Vengeance of Durand; or, The Two Portraits (1913)

Part One: Intense jealousy takes possession of Matthew Durand when his wife's foster brother, Carl, comes from Paris and she greets him affectionately. Carl has been studying art in Europe ... See full summary »

Director:

J. Stuart Blackton

Writer:

Rex Beach (story)
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Cast

Cast overview:
L. Rogers Lytton L. Rogers Lytton ... Matthew Durand
Edith Storey ... Marion - as an Adult
Florence Klotz ... Marion - as a Little Girl
Earle Williams ... Carl, a Painter
Julia Swayne Gordon ... Mrs. Durand
Harry Northrup ... Second
E.K. Lincoln ... Second
Leo Delaney
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Storyline

Part One: Intense jealousy takes possession of Matthew Durand when his wife's foster brother, Carl, comes from Paris and she greets him affectionately. Carl has been studying art in Europe and she has not seen him in many years. She had almost despaired of ever seeing him again and he brings back the ties of their early childhood. Durand is a man strong in his likes and dislikes, unreasonably so, and his wife's adopted relationship to Carl does not in any way ameliorate his anger or consideration. His jealousy develops into an overpowering hatred for Carl which displays itself in no uncertain manner when Carl paints Mrs. Durand's portrait, which she admires and prizes very highly, for Carl has not only displayed his wonderful genius in the work, but has been inspired by the beauty of his foster-sister, who is a most charming woman. Durand interprets his wife's smile as reproduced in the portrait as an evidence of her admiration for the handsome artist and younger man. In fury, he ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama | Romance

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

24 January 1913 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Two Portraits See more »

Filming Locations:

Saratoga Springs, New York, USA

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Remade as The Vengeance of Durand (1919) See more »

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User Reviews

There is deep pathos in the appeal of the orphaned girl
13 July 2017 | by deickemeyerSee all my reviews

This is a real feature. The author is Rex Beach. Quality shows all the way through the two reels. The picture is highly dramatic; there are many moments of deep suspense, and there are situations that stir the emotions. In the duel scene, when the artist drives a bullet into the body of the woman who has innocently caused the trouble, there are all the elements of tragedy. The woman has sought to stop the duel; at the moment the shots are exchanged she comes upon the ground and rushes in between the combatants. There is tragedy in the hand-to-hand encounter between the two men in later years, when the lamp is overturned and the house is set en fire, resulting in the death of Durand, the rescue of the daughter by the artist and his temporary loss of reason. There is deep pathos in the appeal of the orphaned girl, in love with the man who had accidentally killed her mother, and who had indirectly caused the death of her father, when she tries to restore his reason; other means failing, she sits at the piano and plays and sings "The Hours I Spent With Thee, Dear Heart, Are As a String of Pearls to Me." It is a rare situation, one to impress the beholder and to affect him. Space forbids enumeration of the carefully executed scenes. They are all splendidly done. To Earle Williams, who portrayed the artist, falls the most of the work. He has risen to his fine opportunity and given us something unusual in pictured drama. So, also, has Edith Storey. It is difficult to realize that this is the same girl who only a year or two ago was doing work the exact antithesis of the part she plays here, the cowgirl of the plains, fearless in horsemanship. Her versatility is unique. Above all, she is an actress. Roger Lytton, who plays Durand, is strong throughout, Mrs. Swayne has the part of the mother; in this characterization she brings to bear all her experience and proved talent. - The Moving Picture World, February 8, 1913


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