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Fulfilling their destiny by Anne-Katrin Titze

Sônia Braga with Anne-Katrin Titze on her role in Bacurau: "She's a person that takes care of the community." Photo: Rachel Allen

Kleber Mendonça Filho and Juliano Dornelles' Bacurau, shot by Pedro Sotero, had its world première at the Cannes Film Film Festival where it won the jury prize (shared with Ladj Ly's Les Misérables) and is a highlight of the New York Film Festival.

On the afternoon following the Us première at Alice Tully Hall, the directors of Bacurau and Sônia Braga, (who stars alongside Udo Kier (Rick Alverson's The Mountain) and Barbara Colen) joined me for a conversation. The Paris Theatre in New York, where Bruno Barreto's Dona Flor And Her Two Husbands and Aquarius had their premières, has a special place in Sônia Braga's heart.

Bacurau co-director Juliano Dornelles was the production designer on Kleber Mendonça Filho's Aquarius and Neighboring Sounds Photo: Anne-Katrin
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Kino Lorber Eyes ‘Arthouse iTunes’ With Launch of Its Own Streaming Platform

Kino Lorber Eyes ‘Arthouse iTunes’ With Launch of Its Own Streaming Platform
Independent film distributor Kino Lorber on Monday launched its own online movie rental and purchase platform with everything from silent classics “Battleship Potemkin” and “Nosferatu” to works by Jean-Luc Godard, Yorgos Lanthimos, and Rick Alverson.

Kino Lorber President and CEO Richard Lorber bills Kino-Now as a “kind of arthouse iTunes” where some of the most acclaimed films in history will be available at similar price points to Apple’s service. Ana Lily Amirpour’s Iranian vampire western “A Girl Walks Home at Night” is available now to buy for $9.99 or rent for $4.99, for example, and Lanthimos’ “Alps” for $9.99 and $1.99.

“We’ve been leaders in building a direct to consumer business with physical media and now is the time to assert our leadership in the direct to digital space,” Lorber said. “Our superb library will be continually enhanced by the coming of newly acclaimed and award winning theatrical releases. We believe
See full article at Indiewire »

Film News Roundup: Arthouse Specialist Kino Lorber Launches Digital Platform

  • Variety
Film News Roundup: Arthouse Specialist Kino Lorber Launches Digital Platform
In today’s film news roundup, Kino Lorber has started a VOD platform, Tony Todd is starring in a horror-comedy, the Red Nation International Film Festival sets its lineup and ballet dancer Kirsten Bloom Allen starts a production company. VOD Distribution Arthouse distribution specialist Kino Lorber is launching VOD platform Kino Now with more than 600 new releases, classics and international films. Kino Now, announced Monday, will offer exclusive early access to new theatrical releases, festival hits and exclusive titles not available on other streaming platforms or not yet available on home video.

The platform will also include special “bundle” offerings of selected hard-to-find titles as well as collections from renowned filmmakers including international TV series such as “Deutschland 83” and “Bad Banks”; documentary series including Joseph Campbell’s “The Power of Myth”; auteur collections built around Jean-Luc Godard, Lina Wertmüller and Fritz Lang; and pioneers of cinema restorations of the
See full article at Variety »

Art House Distributor Kino Lorber Launches Film & TV VOD Platform Kino Now

  • Deadline
Exclusive: U.S. art house distributor Kino Lorber is launching film and TV VOD streaming platform Kino Now, we can reveal. The service, which includes options to rent and buy, currently hosts 600 titles from the company’s catalog and includes early access to new releases. The number of titles is set to double by the end of the year.

Kino Lorber, which will unveil the platform at a stateside event this evening, tells us the service will be annually refreshed with more than 50 new theatrical releases from Kino Lorber’s first-run and repertory divisions and more than 500 yearly additional titles as “festival direct” exclusives and indie art house digital premieres.

Movies will be generally available around 30-90 days after their theatrical release but some will also get day-and-date releases. Most titles will be $9.99 or less. New releases and certain films that are considered premium will be $14.99 or $19.99 if they are day-and-date releases.
See full article at Deadline »

Forming a mountain by Anne-Katrin Titze

Rick Alverson on Jeff Goldblum with Tye Sheridan in The Mountain: "He is using the boy as a refractive mechanism to validate himself, to show his worth."

In the final instalment of my in-depth conversation with Rick Alverson on The Mountain, he reveals that he is a fan of the films of Robert Bresson, Catherine Breillat, Michael Haneke, Bruno Dumont (Bernard Pruvost in Li'l Quinquin), and Claire Denis, and why Andrei Tarkovsky's Stalker and John Cassavetes' A Woman Under The Influence are "huge" for him. He names Udo Kier as Frederick being the body of The Mountain, Jeff Goldblum's Dr. Fiennes the mind, and Denis Lavant the spirit, with Tye Sheridan's Andy as the son, and credits Frederick Wiseman's Titicut Follies as an influence for one of the numbers in the film.

Rick Alverson on The Mountain: "Essentially, the film is separated into mind, body and spirit.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Jeff Goldblum Is Totally Perplexed About Recent Spider-Man Controversy in Hilarious D23 Interview

Jeff Goldblum Is Totally Perplexed About Recent Spider-Man Controversy in Hilarious D23 Interview
It seems that actor Jeff Goldblum might be taking a page or two from fellow, perplexed Marvel Cinematic Universe star Gwyneth Paltrow.

In a red-carpet interview taken over the weekend at the D23 Expo in Anaheim, Goldblum appeared to be totally nonplused about the recent breakup between Walt Disney Studios, Marvel, and Sony over the Spider-Man franchise. Goldblum was on hand at the event to promote his new Disney+ show “The World According to Jeff Goldblum,” in which he turns ordinary objects on their head. He also has an upcoming voiceover appearance in the Disney+ series “What If…?” which imagines an McU where certain real-life historical events didn’t go as planned. Watch his hilarious bizarre interview below.

Best trailer to come out of #D23Expo last night is Jeff Goldblum’s incredulous response to the #Spiderman drama he hadn’t heard about yet. pic.twitter.com/5Zd0MR7ZPX
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best of Movie Poster of the Day: Part 21

  • MUBI
Above: Chinese poster for Spirited Away; artist: Zao Dao.The most popular poster to date on my Movie Poster of the Day Instagram, by a dragon’s length, with more than double the amount of likes of its closest contender, was this gorgeous Chinese poster (and its color variant which you can see here) for Miyazaki’s Spirited Away (2001), which apparently just got a Chinese theatrical release eighteen years after it was made. The posters were painted by the young Chinese comic book artist Zao Dao who you can, and should, read more about here.I was happy to see Renato Casaro’s prop poster for Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood’s film-within-the-film Kill Me Now Ringo, Said the Gringo—which I wrote about a couple of weeks ago—make such an impression, as well as another of my favorite Casaros painted forty years earlier, for Screamers, a.k.
See full article at MUBI »

‘Luce’ Opens Strong, ‘The Farewell’ Is Here to Stay as Sundance Makes Box-Office Comeback

  • Indiewire
With several name actors, good reviews, and top theaters, Sundance-premiere drama “Luce” led multiple new releases this weekend. Also showing promise are “The Babadook” director Jennifer Kent’s second feature, “The Nightingale,” at two initial theaters, while at one New York location “Jay Myself” scored as yet another strong documentary. And summer breakout “The Farewell” continued its strong expansion, adding over $2.4 million to its already impressive figures.

Opening

Luce (Neon) – Metacritic: 73; Festivals include: Sundance, Tribeca 2019

$132,916 in 5 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $26,583

This kind of narrative indie doesn’t have an easy pass to success these days. With Naomi Watts, Octavia Spencer, and Tim Roth adding to its appeal, the story of parents who face disturbing news about their adopted Eritean son opened in top New York/Los Angeles theaters. Audiences reportedly showed multiple-demographic appeal, critical for any upcoming expansion that seeks a crossover audience.

What comes next: It
See full article at Indiewire »

Link Tank: Tyler "Ninja" Blevins Is Leaving Twitch For Mixer

Spencer Mullen Aug 2, 2019

Tyler "Ninja" Blevins, Avengers: Endgame, Veronica Mars, and more in today's daily Link Tank!

Marvel fans have found an enormous easter egg in Avengers: Endgame.

"Avengers: Endgame used time travel to revisit some of the greatest moments and characters in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and of course, that had to include Robert Redford as the evil Hydra leader Alexander Pierce. We all remember when Pierce shows up in 2012 to claim the Tesseract, but it turns out he might have a second, smaller appearance soon afterwards in the movie — and way further in the past in the McU."

Read more at Inverse.

Here's how the fourth season of Veronica Mars failed its protagonist.

"TV remakes and reboots have seen a steady increase over the last few years. It’s gotten to the point that, long before their predecessors have had a chance to collect dust, a reboot is announced.
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Mountain (2018) – Review

Time to take a detour from the big noisy summer blockbusters and take a trip with an actual person. Well, sort of, since the main character in this film has a different name than the actual famous (or in some circles infamous) medical inventor. But it’s really more of a biography told from an unknown character’s perspective. It’s somewhat like this year’s Best Picture Oscar winner The Green Book. The more renown subject there was celebrated classical pianist Dr. Donald Shirley, but we get to learn about him via the more prominent (leading role) of his driver Tony “Lip” Vallelonga. Now they used the actual names. The new film is just a few years before Green, and a lot of time is spent cruising in a classic auto. However, the doctor of The Mountain doesn’t use his skills to bring joy and happiness. Far, far from it.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Jeff Goldblum Says He Loves Marvel, But Really Wants to Work With Claire Denis

Jeff Goldblum Says He Loves Marvel, But Really Wants to Work With Claire Denis
When Jeff Goldblum appeared on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” to promote his latest role as a lobotomist in “The Mountain,” the 66-year-old actor proclaimed that he lived more in 10 minutes than most people do in a lifetime. The next day, he proved it.

Sitting in midtown Manhattan traffic for 45 minutes en route to an NPR interview, Goldblum covered a lot of ground: revisiting his origins in theater, recalling early work with Philip Kaufman and Woody Allen, analyzing the psychology of his blockbuster performances in “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom” and “Independence Day: Resurgence,” worrying about Donald Trump, and explaining his recent quest to discover world-class auteurs. At the end, he squeezed in an impromptu catch-up with Billy Crystal.

Long beloved as a lanky, bespectacled font of charisma and intellect, Goldblum is now a genuine a pop-culture force. Two decades after “Jurassic Park” and “Independence Day” made him a household name,
See full article at Indiewire »

Indie Box Office: ‘The Farewell’ Hits Top 10 as Non-Fiction ‘Honeyland’ Builds Buzz

Indie Box Office: ‘The Farewell’ Hits Top 10 as Non-Fiction ‘Honeyland’ Builds Buzz
It was more of same at specialized theaters this weekend. Documentaries dominated the openings, led by buzzy “Honeyland” (Neon), while response continues strong for family movie “The Farewell” (A24). Lulu Wang’s Sundance narrative dramedy starring Awkwafina bucked the current documentary trend by landing among the weekend’s Top 10 grossers, even in limited release.

Among the newbies, three Sundance non-fiction debuts opened decently with solid reviews: “Mike Wallace Is Here” (Magnolia), “For Sama” (PBS), and Netflix’s day-and-date title “The Great Hack.” A24 also threw “Skin” starring Jamie Bell as a neo-Nazi into a few theaters along with home availability, with grosses not reported. “The Mountain” (Kino Lorber) was the sole narrative debut to show positive reaction and possible further interest.

Opening

Honeyland (Neon) – Metacritic: 86; Festivals include: Sundance, New Directors/New Film 2019

$30,000 in 2 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $15,000

This marks the best opening PTA among documentaries in recent weeks.
See full article at Indiewire »

Threshold of the screen by Anne-Katrin Titze

The Mountain director Rick Alverson: "There's a lot of parallels between the lobotomy and filmmaking." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In the first instalment of my in-depth conversation with Rick Alverson on The Mountain, co-written with Person To Person director Dustin Guy Defa and Colm O'Leary (The Comedy), shot by Lorenzo Hagerman (Entertainment), starring Jeff Goldblum and Tye Sheridan (Alexandre Moors's The Yellow Birds), with Hannah Gross (Michael Almereyda's Marjorie Prime), Udo Kier, and Denis Lavant (a Leos Carax and Emmanuel Bourdieu favourite), we discuss what "interrupting the trigger" means to him, "parallels between lobotomy and filmmaking", a Django Reinhardt number, and the role the threshold move plays. Rick confided to me that he is a "big Perry Como fan" and that he was "reared on all that Disney stuff" when I brought up a scene that reminded me of Snow White.

Rick Alverson on Denis Lavant: "He's more poetic than I am.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

In Rick Alverson’s Latest Strange Twist, ‘The Mountain’ Stars Jeff Goldblum – Until It Doesn’t

In Rick Alverson’s Latest Strange Twist, ‘The Mountain’ Stars Jeff Goldblum – Until It Doesn’t
In Rick Alverson’s “The Mountain,” Jeff Goldlbum is Dr. Wallace Fiennes, a shrewd and conniving lobotomist. He travels across a dreamy ’50s American landscape, performing invasive surgery on a range of subjects who suffer from questionable ailments. Much like the repression endemic to the era, the seductive charm of Goldblum’s character masks the grotesque nature of his profession. The key turning point comes when Goldblum vanishes from the picture, forcing his wayward young assistant (Tye Sheridan) to confront a much darker world.

“I wanted very strategically to remove the Goldblum of the film,” Alverson said. “I wanted to interrupt the charisma intoxication his character brings, the neatness of that character arc. It felt consistent with the lobotomies in the film.”

It’s one of the most fascinating gambles in this summer movie season. The movie sits on a continuum with Alverson’s “The Comedy” and “Entertainment” for how it assails traditional storytelling,
See full article at Indiewire »

Interview: Rick Alverson – The Mountain

The Mountain feels like a departure for Rick Alverson, whose brand of deliberately challenging and unconventional cinema is evolving beyond the scope of his previous two films, The Comedy (2012) and Entertainment (2015). Leaving (partially) behind the examination of what constitutes humor and entertainment both as genre elements and on the larger level of cultural production, the American filmmaker is evolving formally towards a more classical type of storytelling, even if, as we discuss in the interview, he still wants to engage with those tools as a way of critiquing their traditional use.

Going back to the 1950s to build an explicitly political critique of the era’s social values with regards to masculinity, authority and passivity, Alverson uses Andy, a young man neglected by his family, as the access point to the controversial figure of Dr Wallace Fiennes, a traveling lobotomist who cast a long, charismatic shadow.…

Continue reading.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

The Mountain | Review

Who’s Wally?: Alverson Goes Retro with Punishing, Complex Period Drama

Always intent on making his audience do some of the work, American indie helmer Rick Alverson is back with a glacial road trip through the Pacific Northwest in the 1950s with The Mountain which is every bit as weird and challenging as his previous work but possibly even harder to approach due to the fewer opportunities for release, be it emotionally or merely nervous.

Tye Sheridan graduates here to a starring role after the clown that served as a foil to The Comedian in Entertainment. His Andy is also an unnerving mask (all vacant stare and rugged forehead), though of a different sort – a young man stymied by a harsh father (Udo Kier), he is constantly mortified and accused of being just like his mother, who was hospitalized due a mental condition.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Watch: Not Getting Stoned with Caveh: Rick Alverson

With Rick Alverson’s Filmmaker-recommended The Mountain opening today in theaters, we’re debuting this edition of Not Getting Stoned with Caveh featuring the Virginia-based auteur and his blissed-out interlocutor, Caveh Zahedi. Re the “not,” Alverson disdains pot smoke, allowing Zahedi to puff in his presence but not exhale. Topics discussed: why filmmakers talk about financing all the time, whether cinema produces a physiological response in our bodies that can’t be adequately described in words, and how Alverson thinks about his own filmography.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Watch: Not Getting Stoned with Caveh: Rick Alverson

With Rick Alverson’s Filmmaker-recommended The Mountain opening today in theaters, we’re debuting this edition of Not Getting Stoned with Caveh featuring the Virginia-based auteur and his blissed-out interlocutor, Caveh Zahedi. Re the “not,” Alverson disdains pot smoke, allowing Zahedi to puff in his presence but not exhale. Topics discussed: why filmmakers talk about financing all the time, whether cinema produces a physiological response in our bodies that can’t be adequately described in words, and how Alverson thinks about his own filmography.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘The Mountain’ Review: Mental Health Will Drive You Mad

‘The Mountain’ Review: Mental Health Will Drive You Mad
There’s something about Tye Sheridan. Adopted early on by indie and/or iconoclastic filmmakers like Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life), Jeff Nichols (Mud) and David Gordon Green (Joe), he played fresh-faced innocents on the cusp of receiving wisdom or being irrevocably warped. Spielberg gave him a shot at leading-man heroics with Ready Player One; the X-Men movies gave him a chance at steady franchise superheroics by casting him as Baby Cyclops. His specialty seemed to be passivity. He didn’t look like your typical assembly-line CW hunk, though
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘The Mountain’ Film Review: Jeff Goldblum Plays an Authoritative Lobotomist in 1950s-Set Drama

  • The Wrap
‘The Mountain’ Film Review: Jeff Goldblum Plays an Authoritative Lobotomist in 1950s-Set Drama
Let’s start here: the latest project from cinematic provocateur Rick Alverson is probably best suited for the sort of on-a-loop side room you’d find in a modern art museum, where it could endlessly challenge viewers but give curious wanderers a quick way out if they’ve had enough. Alverson calls “The Mountain” an “anti-Utopian film,” but doesn’t that describe most movies these days? Where his effort does stand out is in its gravely stark, often breathtaking beauty, and its urgent desire to Make a Point.

A cynic might wonder why a filmmaker who vocally disdains popular culture would hire Jeff Goldblum, one of its cultishly beloved icons. But Goldblum more than delivers as Wallace Fiennes, a doctor who travels California performing lobotomies in the mid-1950s. One of his patients is a woman who has been locked away for a long time, leaving her 20-year-old son Andy (Tye Sheridan) adrift and bereft.
See full article at The Wrap »
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