Kaet McAnneny - News Poster

News

Shanghai Film Review: ‘The Wolf Hour’

  • Variety
Shanghai Film Review: ‘The Wolf Hour’
Run a finger along any of the surfaces in Alistair Banks Griffin’s sophomore feature “The Wolf Hour,” and it will come up slicked with sweat, grime and the residual soot of the city. It is the summer of 1977, and it’s hotter than hell. June Leigh (Naomi Watts) perches on the window sill of the squalid Bronx apartment she dares not leave, facing right into a lethargic fan that scarcely even stirs the wavy brown hair off her sticky shoulders. Outside, little blisters of violence and intimidation erupt on the tinder-box streets, and somewhere nearby, Son of Sam is murdering women with wavy brown hair. “Hello from the gutters of New York City,” the serial killer writes in letters to the papers, and though Griffin’s heavy-on-atmosphere, light-on-plot film takes place almost exclusively five floors up from ground level, those gutters feel palpably, oppressively close.

The Wolf Hour” is a peculiar film,
See full article at Variety »

SXSW Film Review: ‘Daniel Isn’t Real’

  • Variety
An alter ego gets a little too altering in “Daniel Isn’t Real.” Based on co-writer Brian DeLeeuw’s novel “In This Way I Was Saved,” this strong second feature for director Adam Egypt Mortimer centers on an unhappy youth whose childhood “imaginary friend” returns to active duty, to initially helpful ends that all too soon turn malevolent and destructive. Spectrevision’s stylishly crafted psychological horror thriller has enough twists and finesse to attract favorable attention beyond genre bounds, signaling upbeat prospects for exposure in various formats.

City kid Luke (initially played by Griffin Robert Faulkner) has to bear a lot of stress for an 8-year-old: His parents are splitting up, and his mother Claire (Mary Stuart Masterson) is unstable, to put it mildly. Leaving the house one day to escape another marital argument, he comes across something even more traumatic — the aftermath of a seemingly random mass shooting.

It
See full article at Variety »

2019 Next Section Sundance Trading Card Series: #13. Kaet McAnneny – The Wolf Hour

Production Designer Kaet McAnneny from Alistair Banks Griffin’s The Wolf Hour is among the voices, faces and creative folks that are a part of the ten films selected for our favourite section at the Sundance Film Festival. Added to the fest at the beginning of the decade, over time, the Next section (formerly referred to as “<=>”) has unearthed some of the best voices in micro American indie film projects with the likes of Sebastian Silva, Josh Mond, Rick Alverson, Anna Rose Holmer, Andrew Dosunmu, Craig Zobel, David Lowery and Janicza Bravo. We return with Sundance Trading Card Series focusing on the 2019 Next section selected films and personalities.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed