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Nothing Bad Can Happen Movie Review

  • ShockYa
Nothing Bad Can Happen Movie Review
Title: Nothing Bad Can Happen ( “Tore tanzt”) Drafthouse Films Director: Katrin Gebbe Writer: Katrin Gebbe Cast: Julius Feldmeier, Sascha Alexander Gersak, Annika Kuhl, Swantje Kohlhof Running Time: 110 minutes, Special Features: “Tore Tanzt: A Conversation With Julius, Katrin and Verena”; interview with director Katrin Gebbe; 12-page booklet; theatrical trailer; digital download of the film. Available: 10.14.14 Disclaimer: Thar be spoilers. Inspired by true events. Tore (Julius Feldmeier) has recently joined a religious organization of punks called The Jesus Freaks. After getting baptized, he and his friend Owl stop by a broken down van and a helpless family inside. Tore walks up to them and offers his help, by laying [ Read More ]

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Nothing Bad Can Happen | Blu-Ray Review

After scooping up the New Auteur Award at AFI Fest 2013, Nothing Bad Can Happen continued to garner a decidedly divisive response upon a limited theatrical release (which began after the Cannes premiere in 2013 Un Certain Regard Sidebar, where the jeers were as resounding as the guffaws, with director, cast, and Ucr President Thomas Vinterberg in attendance). At best a lurid conversation piece about despicable tendencies in human nature and at worst a hopelessly exploitative examination of based-on-a-true event terror, Gebbe’s film is a slippery slope of degradation with a heavy dose and conjecture and assumption.

Gebbe’s debut doesn’t quite reach the same levels of finesse as uncomfortably similar fare and often tries too hard to be shockingly provocative, sometimes at the expense of some narrative and character development. Nevertheless, Gebbe’s film never loses its choke-hold and will have you squirming uncomfortably until its final frames.

Tore
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: Nothing Bad Can Happen

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Oct. 14, 2014

Price: DVD $24.99, Blu-ray $29.99

Studio: Drafthouse/Cinedigm

Julius Feldmeier--before the nastiness begins--in Nothing Bad Can Happen.

A young man is brought face to face with inhumanity and pushed to his limits in the thriller Nothing Bad Can Happen, the debut feature from German writer-director Katrin Gebbe.

Inspired by true events, the film follows Tore (Julius Feldmeier), a young lost soul involved with an underground Christian punk movement. After a chance encounter helping a stranded driver named Benno (Sascha Alexander Gersak), Tore is invited back to Benno’s home and becomes friendly with him, his wife and two children. Before long, Tore moves into a tent in the garden and gradually becomes part of the family. However, Benno can’t resist playing a cruel game designed to challenge Tore’s beliefs. As his trials become more and more extreme, Tore finds his capacity for love and resilience pushed to its limits…
See full article at Disc Dish »

Nothing Bad Can Happen – The Review

How far does your faith stretch? If you’ve never considered your answer to that question, I highly recommend watching Katrin Gebbe’s Nothing Bad Can Happen. The writer and director’s feature-film debut is a powerfully poignant meditation on that very question. This recommendation, however, comes with a warning of great caution. You are likely to be offended, but this is perfectly fine.

This German film’s original title is “Tore tanzt,” which translates in English to “Tore dances.” Tore, being the film’s central character, is played by Julius Feldmeier. Tore is a pale, lanky teenager who somewhat resembles Napoleon Dynamite. In an effort to find meaning and purpose in his life, Tore joins a religious group in Hamburg, Germany who refer to themselves as The Jesus Freaks. Tore is perfectly at home amidst the group, but it is apparent he is truly a lone sheep existing within a pack of wolves.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘Nothing Bad Can Happen’ is disturbing and sickening, in both good and bad ways

Nothing Bad Can Happen

Written and directed by Katrin Gebbe

Germany, 2013

It’s rare that a film like Katrin Gebbe’s Nothing Bad Can Happen refuses to focus on vengeance as resolution, or even conflict. Rather, despite its unflinching brutality, there are some truly uplifting ideas at work. And then it decides to hate women.

Based on true events previously covered in an internet article, the film concerns Tore, a young member of the Hamburg-founded commune ‘The Jesus Freaks’, and by far the most naive. He saunters through the commune, bouncing his short blonde hair and lanky frame to the sounds of Jesus metal. His naivete is near savant-like, with him even believing that the power of prayer can help start a dead automobile. When this (miraculously) actually works, he comes to stay with the vehicle’s owner, Benno (Sascha Alexander Gersak), and his family.

Benno slowly becomes a new,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Exclusive: Have A Water Fight In Clip From Award-Winning 'Nothing Bad Can Happen'

Having faith is easy, but maintaining that bond with and belief in a higher being is where the real test lies. And it's a cinematic theme that's almost as old as the medium itself, but writer/director Katrine Gebbe finds a fresh spin on it with "Nothing Bad Can Happen." Debuting at the Cannes Film Festival last in year in the Un Certain Regard category, it marked a promising start for the director's first feature, and now it's coming stateside for those intrigued by thrillers underscored by big ideas. Based on a true story, and starring Julius Feldmeier, Sascha Alexander Gersak, Annika Kuhl, Swantje Kohlhof, Til Theinert, Daniel Michel, and Nadine Boske, "Nothing Bad Can Happen" tells the tale of young Christian punk Tore, who falls into living with a dysfunctional family. And it's here where the trouble begins, when the man of the house initiates a series of games,
See full article at The Playlist »

Nothing Bad Can Happen | Review

Book of Job 2: Gebbe’s Divisive Debut High Brow Torture Porn

The only German entry in 2013’s Cannes film festival also happened to be one of the most grueling with Katrin Gebbe’s debut, Tore Tanzt (Nothing Bad Can Happen), which is bound to inspire as much derision as it does praise. Unfortunately, Gebbe’s debut doesn’t quite reach the same levels of finesse as uncomfortably similar fare and often tries too hard to be shockingly provocative, sometimes at the expense at some narrative and character development. Nevertheless, Gebbe’s film never loses its choke-hold and will have you squirming uncomfortably until its final frames.

Tore (Julius Feldmeier) is a kindly drifter who we assume has been abandoned by his family like many of the ragtag misfits in the group he is now affiliated with known as The Jesus Freaks. Living (or maybe even squatting) in what looks
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Nothing Bad Can Happen in These Latest Stills

A fresh batch of images from the highly acclaimed horror drama Nothing Bad Can Happen, directed by German filmmaker Katrin Gebbe, ended up in our inbox; and we decided to share before anything bad could happen. The flick will be getting a June 27th release in Los Angeles and New York with an expanded national roll-out to follow.

Nothing Bad Can Happen stars Julius Feldmeier, Sascha Alexander Gersak, Annika Kuhl, and Swantje Kohlhof.

After premiering at the Cannes Film Festival in 2013, Nothing Bad Can Happen was met with praise and awards such as:

AFI Fest 2013 (Won – New Auteur Award)

Fantastic Fest 2013 (Won- “Next Wave” Spotlight Competition,” Best Actress)

German Film Critics Association 2014 (Won – Best Feature Film Debut, Best Actor)

Bavarian Film Festival 2014 (Won – Best Young Direction)

Tallinn Black Night Film Festival 2013 (Won – Best Youth Film)

Zurich Film Festival 2013 (Official Selection)

São Paulo International Film Festival 2013 (Official Selection)

Synopsis:

Inspired by horrifying true events,
See full article at Dread Central »

Nothing Bad Can Happen in This Trailer and Artwork

The official theatrical artwork and trailer have arrived for the highly acclaimed horror drama Nothing Bad Can Happen, directed by German filmmaker Katrin Gebbe. The flick will be getting a June 27th release in Los Angeles and New York with an expanded national rollout to follow, so be sure to check your local listings when the time comes.

Nothing Bad Can Happen stars Julius Feldmeier, Sascha Alexander Gersak, Annika Kuhl, and Swantje Kohlhof.

After premiering at the Cannes Film Festival in 2013, Nothing Bad Can Happen was met with praise and awards such as:

AFI Fest 2013 (Won – New Auteur Award)

Fantastic Fest 2013 (Won- “Next Wave” Spotlight Competition,” Best Actress)

German Film Critics Association 2014 (Won – Best Feature Film Debut, Best Actor)

Bavarian Film Festival 2014 (Won – Best Young Direction)

Tallinn Black Night Film Festival 2013 (Won – Best Youth Film)

Zurich Film Festival 2013 (Official Selection)

São Paulo International Film Festival 2013 (Official Selection)

Synopsis:

Inspired by horrifying true events,
See full article at Dread Central »

New Stills, Clip, and Release Info for Nothing Bad Can Happen Will Test Your Faith

Highly acclaimed horror drama Nothing Bad Can Happen, directed by German filmmaker Katrin Gebbe, is getting a June 27th release in Los Angeles and New York with an expanded national rollout to follow, and right now we have several stills and the first clip from the film to share.

Nothing Bad Can Happen stars Julius Feldmeier, Sascha Alexander Gersak, Annika Kuhl, and Swantje Kohlhof.

After premiering at the Cannes Film Festival in 2013, Nothing Bad Can Happen was met with praise and awards such as:

AFI Fest 2013 (Won – New Auteur Award)

Fantastic Fest 2013 (Won- “Next Wave” Spotlight Competition,” Best Actress)

German Film Critics Association 2014 (Won – Best Feature Film Debut, Best Actor)

Bavarian Film Festival 2014 (Won – Best Young Direction)

Tallinn Black Night Film Festival 2013 (Won – Best Youth Film)

Zurich Film Festival 2013 (Official Selection)

São Paulo International Film Festival 2013 (Official Selection)

Synopsis:

Inspired by horrifying true events, Nothing Bad Can Happen follows Tore,
See full article at Dread Central »

Full Schedule Unveiled for The Stanley Film Festival

Shine on, kids! The full schedule for the Stanley Film Festival, which runs at the iconic and historic Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Co, April 24-27, has been announced; and we have all the details you need right here. Dig it!

From the Press Release

The Stanley Film Festival (Sff), produced by the Denver Film Society and presented by NBC Universal's Chiller, announced today its Opening Night film and several special event highlights and experiences taking place at the four-day event (April 24-27, 2014).

The Stanley Film Festival celebrates the best in independent horror cinema at the hotel that inspired The Shining. The Festival will host a full slate of films, panels, competitions, and special events - all at the beautiful and historically haunted Stanley Hotel.

The Stanley Film Festival will open Thursday, April 24, with a Gala Presentation of an original documentary from EPiX, Doc of the Dead. Directed by Colorado
See full article at Dread Central »

The Stanley Film Festival Announces Full Program, Including The Sacrament, Dead Snow 2

The Stanley Hotel launched its first annual Stanley Film Festival last year and put together an impressive group of horror films and guests. After initially announcing Doc of the Dead as their opening film, we now have the full programming list, which includes screenings of The Sacrament, Dead Snow: Red vs. Dead, and much more:

“The Stanley Film Festival (Sff) produced by the Denver Film Society (Dfs) and presented by Chiller, announced today its full line-up and schedule. As previously announced, Doc of the Dead will open Sff. The festival, taking place April 24-27, will close with the mockumentary from Taika Waititi and Jemaine Clement (Flight of the Conchords), What We Do In The Shadows, about a house of vampires trying to get back in touch with modern society. Throughout the four-day celebration of the best in horror cinema, Sff will showcase a full slate of features, shorts, panels,
See full article at DailyDead »

'Home' wins top German Critics Award

  • ScreenDaily
'Home' wins top German Critics Award
Edgar Reitz’s Home From Home [pictured] wins best film, while Katrin Gebbe’s Cannes 2013 title Tore Tanzt wins best debut.

Edgar Reitz’s Home From Home (Die andere Heimat) and newcomer Katrin Gebbe’s Nothing Bad Can Happen (Tore Tanzt) were the big winners at this year’s German Film Critics Awards presented in Berlin this week.

Reitz, who had been awarded the Producer Prize with his son Christian at the Bavarian Film Awards last month, received the critics’ distinction of Best Film of 2013 and hi cinematographer Gernot Roll the Prize for Best Cinematography.

The film, which is being handled by Arri Worldsales, has been picked by several distributors in Berlin including Artificial Eye/Curzon for the UK.

Gebbe, whose film had premiered last year in Cannes, picked up the prize for Best Feature Film Debut and one of her lead actors, Sascha Alexander Gersak, shared the prize for Best Actor with Murat Kurnaz for his role
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Home, Tore Tanzt win German Critics Awards

  • ScreenDaily
Home, Tore Tanzt win German Critics Awards
Edgar Reitz’s Home From Home [pictured] wins best film, while Katrin Gebbe’s Cannes 2013 title wins best debut.

Edgar Reitz’s Home From Home (Die andere Heimat) and newcomer Katrin Gebbe’s Nothing Bad Can Happen (Tore Tanzt) were the big winners at this year’s German Film Critics Awards presented in Berlin this week.

Reitz, who had been awarded the Producer Prize with his son Christian at the Bavarian Film Awards last month, received the critics’ distinction of Best Film of 2013 and hi cinematographer Gernot Roll the Prize for Best Cinematography.

The film, which is being handled by Arri Worldsales, has been picked by several distributors in Berlin including Artificial Eye/Curzon for the UK.

Gebbe, whose film had premiered last year in Cannes, picked up the prize for Best Feature Film Debut and one of her lead actors, Sascha Alexander Gersak, shared the prize for Best Actor with Murat Kurnaz for his role in 5 Years
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Home and Tore Tanzt win at German Critics Awards

  • ScreenDaily
Home and Tore Tanzt win at German Critics Awards
Edgar Reitz’s Home From Home [pictured] wins best film, while Katrin Gebbe’s Cannes 2013 title wins best debut.

Edgar Reitz’s Home From Home (Die andere Heimat) and newcomer Katrin Gebbe’s Nothing Bad Can Happen (Tore Tanzt) were the big winners at this year’s German Film Critics Awards presented in Berlin this week.

Reitz, who had been awarded the Producer Prize with his son Christian at the Bavarian Film Awards last month, received the critics’ distinction of Best Film of 2013 and hi cinematographer Gernot Roll the Prize for Best Cinematography.

The film, which is being handled by Arri Worldsales, has been picked by several distributors in Berlin including Artificial Eye/Curzon for the UK.

Gebbe, whose film had premiered last year in Cannes, picked up the prize for Best Feature Film Debut and one of her lead actors, Sascha Alexander Gersak, shared the prize for Best Actor with Murat Kurnaz for his role in 5 Years
See full article at ScreenDaily »

FEARnet Movie Review: 'Nothing Bad Can Happen'

  • FEARnet
FEARnet Movie Review: 'Nothing Bad Can Happen'
"It's an unpleasant film with a noble message," is how a friend described the new German film Nothing Bad Can Happen to me before I watched it, and not only did I agree with the man's assessment -- I found it one of the most compelling and quietly unsettling thrillers in quite some time. Incidentally, that man was Tim League, whose Drafthouse Films acquired the U.S. rights to Nothing Bad Can Happen about a week later. That's called putting your money where your mouth is.

  A devious and slyly intelligent psychological thriller about the value of faith versus the power of nihilism, Nothing Bad Can Happen is about an aimless young religious zealot who, through a strange series of events, finds himself living with a "normal" suburban family -- a family that clearly does not share his religious beliefs. At first young Tore (Julian Felmeier) butts heads with patriarch
See full article at FEARnet »

Fantastic Fest: ‘Nothing Bad Can Happen’ Is a Shocking, Diverse Film That Demands Attention

Editor’s note: Our review of Nothing Bad Can Happen originally ran during this year’s Cannes Film Festival, but we’re re-running it here as it plays Fantastic Fest. One of the most loudly-jeered though curiously little-discussed films at this year’s Cannes Film Festival was first-time director Katrin Gebbe‘s Nothing Bad Can Happen, the single German film playing at 2013′s fest. For sure, it’s controversial material, guaranteed to divide audiences on whether or not it is in fact a criticism of religious sectarianism or merely a depiction of humanity’s dark heart. Tore (Julius Feldmeier) is a young man who has fallen in with so-called Jesus Freaks, a punk Christian sect basing themselves out of a house in Hamburg. Though an awkwardly unassuming sort, Tore one day makes acquaintance with an affable family man, Benno (Sascha Gersak), and decides to move into his home, where he meets and forges a connection with Benno
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Cannes Film Festival 2013: 'Nothing Bad Can Happen' review

  • CineVue
★★☆☆☆ Showing in the Un Certain Regard section of the 66th Cannes Film Festival, Katrin Gebbe's debut film Nothing Bad Can Happen (Tore tanzt, 2013) is a harrowing tale of abuse with a highly dubious morality at its core. Tore (Julius Feldmeier) is a young, gawky member of The Jesus Freaks, a collective dressed like anarchists or members of the Black Bloc, but who listen to Christian punk and are devoted to their own version of the faith. After a chance encounter with a family in a car park Tore fixes their car with the power of prayer - and a setback with the group and his best friend, he's persuaded to move in with them.

Tore is coerced by Benno (Sascha Alexander Gersak), an outgoing, seemingly generous man who struggles to connect with his partner's children, and also enjoys indulging in 'rough and tumble'. However, the horseplay soon becomes more
See full article at CineVue »

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