News

Fantasia 2019 Review: Jesus Shows You The Way To The Highway Will Smash Your Brain To Pieces

Truly original artistic voices are few and far between. When it comes to contemporary genre cinema, a few innovators come to mind when one thinks about the 21st century. Filmmakers like Khavn from the Phillippines, Q from India, Sono Sion and Ujicha from Japan, and Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani from Belgium have carved their own paths through a cinema jungle filled with overwhelmingly similar material. A new voice has emerged to join those ranks over the last few years, Miguel Llansó, a filmmaker whose low budget afro-futurist science-fiction film Crumbs surprised the festival circuit a few years ago. Now Llansó is back with his second feature, Jesus Shows You the Way to the Highway, and it is every bit as bizarre and unique as...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Peter Strickland: Moving in Stereo

Peter Strickland's Berberian Sound Studio (2012) and The Duke of Burgundy (2014) are showing in June and July, 2019 on Mubi in the United Kingdom.“…if the film or television image seems to ‘speak’ for itself, it is actually a ventriloquist’s speech.”—Michel Chion, Audio-Vision, 1990In an early scene in The Duke of Burgundy, a character describes how one can tell two seemingly-identical species of butterfly apart by the sound each makes, saying, “Since these species are so visually indistinguishable from each other, the sound they produce should differentiate the two.” In a way, the statement provides a thesis for much of the cinema of Peter Strickland relative to his aesthetic forebears. According to the majority of film writing that takes either of his two features Berberian Sound Studio or The Duke of Burgundy as a subject, Strickland’s oeuvre owes something to European genre cinema—more popularly known in French
See full article at MUBI »

Dreaming Is Nursed in Darkness

  • MUBI
Yann Gonzalez’s Knife+Heart arrives at a time when contemporary genre cinema is reckoning with itself. In the last ten years, a number of filmmakers, particularly in Francophone Europe, has produced and directed relatively high-profile films occupying a genre that has come to be known as neo-giallo. A definition for neo-giallo borders on impossible, save perhaps a film that retroactively occupies the European thriller genre of giallo, which peaked in popularity in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and in doing so becomes a film made self-consciously, with an awareness of the genre’s conventions and thus a postmodern relationship to the material. At first glance, Gonzalez’s film certainly qualifies as such, extrapolating certain elements of giallo to an extent where it almost becomes necessary to understand the pedigree that haunts the genre as a whole. The film is not by necessity a deconstruction, but rather an earnest
See full article at MUBI »

Horror-On-Sea 2019: ‘Blood of the Tribades’ Review

  • Nerdly
Stars: Chloé Cunha, Mary Widow, Seth Chatfield, Tymisha ‘Tush’ Harris, Kristofer Jenson, Zach Pidgeon, Sindy Katrotic, Simone de Boudoir, Stabatha La Thrills, Sophia Cacciola, Aurora Grabill, Melinda Green | Written and Directed by Sophia Cacciola, Michael J. Epstein

2000 years after the great vampire Bathor established the village of Bathory, superstition and religious violence take over as the men and women battle for control. When the men are afflicted with a mysterious illness, they become certain that the vampire women of Bathory are responsible for their ills, and thus, the hunt begins! Long-forgotten lovers Élisabeth and Fantine find that, with the help of those who were banished, it is their fate to piece together the past and help preserve what little of their society remains before Bathor’s impending return and judgment.

The best way to describe Blood of the Tribades is if Jess Franco had discovered Suicide Girls Then gone out and made Vampyros Lesbos.
See full article at Nerdly »

New to Streaming: ‘Happy as Lazzaro,’ A24 on Kanopy, ‘In the Realm of Perfection,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’re highlighting the noteworthy titles that have recently hit platforms. Check out this week’s selections below and an archive of past round-ups here.

A24 Films on Kanopy

With FilmStruck sadly heading into its early grave last night, one may be looking for more options for streaming. One of the best alternatives is Kanopy, which can be accessed for free with a library card in select areas. They’ve also just added a wealth of A24 films ranging from this year’s First Reformed and Lean on Pete all the way back to their first offerings like Enemy and Spring Breakers.

Where to Stream: Kanopy

De Palma (Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow)

Recently, Kent Jones’ Hitchcock /Truffaut — a documentary on the famous interview sessions between the two directors — boasted perhaps the most chaotic,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Line-up for third annual ‘FilmFear’ season announced

  • Nerdly
Home and Film4 have today announced the programme for the third annual FilmFear season – six days of horror, extreme cinema, cult favourites and special guests coming to Manchester this October.

Acclaimed Scandi fantasy Border, co-written by the author of Let the Right One In, kicks off the season on 26th October and is the first of eight new films from across the globe to screen over the six-day event. A visceral fusion of Nordic noir, social realism and supernatural horror, Border’s genre-defying tone is matched in fellow Swedish title Videoman, a mystery-thriller/relationship-drama that will surprise audiences with its tonal shifts, while the chilling horror St. Agatha from celebrated filmmaker Darren Lynn Bousman bolsters the emerging ‘Nunsploitation’ genre. Let the Corpses Tan is a ferocious take on Euro Westerns and Italian crime ‘Poliziotteschi’ genre from Belgian directing duo Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani (The Strange Colour of Your Body
See full article at Nerdly »

‘Let the Corpses Tan’: How the Year’s Bloodiest Western Draws on Tarantino’s ‘Kill Bill,’ A Fine Art Movement From the ’60s, and More

  • Indiewire
No one makes movies quite like French husband-and-wife team Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani. The directing duo first made a splash in 2009 with “Amer,” a postmodern homage to Italian giallo films that was followed up by another giallo homage, 2013’s “The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears.” Both films are filled with a stunning blend of eye-popping and provocative visuals, a kaleidoscope of colors that evokes Dario Argento’s sumptuous technicolor nightmares, woven together with scores lifted from giallos from yesteryear. With this intoxicating cinematic formula, Cattet and Forzani quickly became must-watch genre filmmakers.

Rather than sticking with this successful formula, they branched out with their latest film, “Let the Corpses Tan,” putting their own spin on the western. “Let the Corpses Tan” takes place on a sun-soaked, isolated island hideaway, where a grizzled thug named Rhino (Stéphane Ferrara) and his gang plan to hide away with an eccentric artist,
See full article at Indiewire »

Interview: Filmmakers Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani on Spaghetti Westerns and the Nearly Impossible Filming Locale of Let The Corpses Tan

  • DailyDead
This past Friday, Kino Lorber released Let the Corpses Tan, the latest movie from the filmmaking team of Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani in New York and Los Angeles, and this week, their tribute to ’70s Italian crime cinema expands to theaters across the Us, bringing together an eclectic gaggle of characters in a bullet-riddled ballet drenched in sun, sweat, and hallucinatory visions. Daily Dead recently had the opportunity to speak with both Forzani and Cattet about their decision to turn the Let the Corpses Tan novel (written by Jean-Patrick Manchette and Jean-Pierre Bastid) into a cinematic experience, their approach to this story, the immense difficulties of finding their filming location, and more.

Congrats on the film, you guys. What was it about the story in the original book that felt right to you about translating it for film?

Hélène Cattet: First, it was me who read the book, and when I read the book,
See full article at DailyDead »

‘Ya Veremos’ Arrives To A Good Start; ‘Eighth Grade’ Passes $13M: Specialty Box Office

  • Deadline
‘Ya Veremos’ Arrives To A Good Start; ‘Eighth Grade’ Passes $13M: Specialty Box Office
Mexican drama Ya Veremos is dominating the slew of specialty newcomers this Labor Day weekend, though overall limited release launches are trending slow. IFC Films doc Pick Of The Litter, however, is showing some gusto, scoring the weekend’s highest per-theater average among the specialties. Sony Classics, meanwhile, expanded Glenn Close starrer The Wife, crossing $1M, while A24’s Eighth Grade is expected to go over $13M by the end of the holiday weekend.

Pantelion/Lionsgate Ya Veremos opened in 369 locations, grossing an estimated $1,800,000 in the three-day. The company is estimating a $2.27M gross for the entire weekend, for a 4-day $6,165 average. Pantelion has had a good run with Labor Day weekend period releases including Instructions Not Included, opening at the end of August, 2013, eventually totaling over $44.46M, the highest-grossing Spanish-language film stateside. There was also Un Gallo con Muchos Huevos which opened in early September 2015, which had a cume of $9M.
See full article at Deadline »

Review: Gunfire for Breakfast—Cattet and Forzani's "Let the Corpses Tan"

  • MUBI
Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani’s Let the Corpses Tan is a film about sensations, derived more so from the mechanics of filmmaking than from storytelling. Like their previous works, it exists as a standalone genre film in the classic European mold, even when divorced from its stylistic trappings, with sunshine and gunfire supplanting dark corridors and unsheathed daggers. In the last ten years, the reception of Cattet and Forzani has come to understand theirs as a tactile cinema: What happens onscreen is never quite as important as how it looks and sounds—or perhaps, how it ‘feels’—while it’s happening. While Corpses is certainly exploitation cinema formally in its emulation of European westerns and gangster films, it is also exploitation cinema by design in its manipulation and abstraction of photography and sound.As with their two previous features Amer (2009) and The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears
See full article at MUBI »

Shooting 16mm, Loading in by Helicopter and Sex Scenes as Performance: Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani on Let the Corpses Tan

French directing duo Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani burst onto the genre scene with their mesmerizing, impeccably crafted 2009 giallo film Amer. The married couple followed it up with the even more daring spiritual sequel The Strange Colour of Your Bodies Tears. Now, Cattet and Forzani are back and bringing their talent for precision filmmaking into other genres. In Let the Corpses Tan, based on the book Laissez bronzer les cadavres by Jean-Patrick Manchette and Jean-Pierre Bastid, thieves steal a pile of gold and getaway to a coastal village, the home of Luce, an enigmatic artist involved in a seedy, […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Shooting 16mm, Loading in by Helicopter and Sex Scenes as Performance: Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani on Let the Corpses Tan

French directing duo Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani burst onto the genre scene with their mesmerizing, impeccably crafted 2009 giallo film Amer. The married couple followed it up with the even more daring spiritual sequel The Strange Colour of Your Bodies Tears. Now, Cattet and Forzani are back and bringing their talent for precision filmmaking into other genres. In Let the Corpses Tan, based on the book Laissez bronzer les cadavres by Jean-Patrick Manchette and Jean-Pierre Bastid, thieves steal a pile of gold and getaway to a coastal village, the home of Luce, an enigmatic artist involved in a seedy, […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Let the Corpses Tan’ Film Review: High Art Meets High Octane in Sumptuous Euro-Sleaze Shootout

  • The Wrap
“Let the Corpses Tan” tells you right away what it’s about. It’s about painting with bullets. And what a beautiful picture it makes.

The third film from directors Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani is, like their previous works “Amer” and “The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears,” a reinvigoration of cult European filmmaking. The so-called “Eurosleaze” works of sensuality and violence that are sometimes celebrated, and sometimes rudely dismissed. The filmmakers seem to find within these allegedly outdated genres a fantastic inspiration, and they use iconic color timing, bold camera angles, and vibrant music to get away with telling stories so shocking, they probably wouldn’t be acceptable otherwise.

Let the Corpses Tan” is a brusque about-face from their first two Giallo-inspired killer thrillers. It’s a dense shootout of a movie, incorporating elements of the spaghetti western, the ultraviolent grindhouse, and a surreal rumination on art itself.
See full article at The Wrap »

Movie Review – Let the Corpses Tan (2018)

Let The Corpses Tan, 2018.

Directed by Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani.

Starring Elina Löwensohn, Stéphane Ferrara, Bernie Bonvoisin, Michelangelo Marchese, Marc Barbé, Marine Sainsily, Hervé Sogne, and Pierre Nisse.

Synopsis:

A gang of thieves with over 250kg of gold try to hide out in a French island retreat. However, there are all sorts of complications; a love triangle with the writer who lives there, a sexually devious muse, disloyalty among the crew and of course, the police find them. This descends into a day-long stand off where corruption and double crosses erupt from the madness.

Cattet and Forzani’s vibrant thriller opens with credits typical of 80s horror movies, homaging maestros of the genre but particularly alluding to Dario Argento. This is quickly followed up with a cerebral punch of a gunshot played against the picturesque surroundings – this foreshadows some sort of terror mixing with the idyllic, ‘trouble in paradise’ you could say.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Poster of the Week: Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani’s Origin Stories

  • MUBI
Above: French poster for Django Kill… If You Live, Shoot!. Artist: Enrico de Seta.Starting today, the Quad Cinema in New York will be playing what must be the most entertaining and esoteric genre series of the summer. In advance of the release of the delirious nuovo spaghetti western crime thriller Let the Corpses Tan, the Quad has invited directors Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani to program ten personal favorites that have influenced their new film.The resulting curation is a fabulous mix of genres and locations, with films both well known (John Boorman’s Point Blank) and relatively obscure. The majority are from the filmmakers’ favorite period of the late ’60s and early ’70s—as the Quad’s introduction says, “apart from Quentin Tarantino, few writer/directors active in film today have the lifeblood of 1960s and 1970s cinema coursing through their veins as fulsomely as Hélène Cattet and
See full article at MUBI »

Sarajevo’s Kinoscope Sidebar Focuses on the Bold and Experimental

  • Variety
Sarajevo’s Kinoscope Sidebar Focuses on the Bold and Experimental
Since its launch in 2012, the Sarajevo Film Festival’s Kinoscope sidebar has presented challenging, experimental and genre-bending titles from around the globe.

This year’s lineup includes an eclectic showcase of feature and documentary works from mostly young directors, half of them women, including Nicolas Pesce’s U.S. thriller “Piercing”; Dominga Sotomayor’s “Too Late to Die Young”; Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani’s “Let the Corpses Tan”; and Gustav Möller’s Danish thriller “The Guilty,” this year’s opening film.

Kinoscope programmers Alessandro Raja and Mathilde Henrot sat down with Variety to discuss the section and this year’s lineup.

Q: Half of your films are by female filmmakers. Is there a conscious effort on your part to present works by women?

Henrot: It’s a conscious selection which doesn’t require too much effort. Since the beginning of Kinoscope we’ve always chosen to have a balanced
See full article at Variety »

15 Films to See in August

As the summer comes to a close, it seems as though most distributors–especially on the indie side–were holding onto their gems before the busy fall festival slate as a number of the year’s best films arrive this month. If we’re being honest, though, our most-anticipated film won’t actually get a theatrical release, but will instead arrive on The Criterion Collection with Terrence Malick’s extended edition of The Tree of Life. However for this feature, we’ll stick to those films one will be able to see in theaters, so without further adieu, here are the 15 films we recommend this month.

Matinees to See: Nico, 1988 (8/1), Christopher Robin (8/3), A Prayer Before Dawn (8/10), Buybust (8/10), Summer of ’84 (8/10), Crazy Rich Asians (8/15), Juliet, Naked (8/17), Memoir of War (8/17), Notes on an Appearance (8/17), We the Animals (8/17), The Wife (8/17), The Night is Short, Walk On Girl (8/21), What Keeps You Alive (8/24), Papillon (8/24), The Happytime Murders
See full article at The Film Stage »

Rushes. Claude Lanzmann, Kodak Tour, Football Movie Sponsorship

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSClaude Lanzmann, Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Satre, 1967. Photo via Rithy Panh.Shoah director and singular cinematic chronicler of the Holocaust, Claude Lanzmann has sadly left us. Daniel Lewis provides a comprehensive remembrance for The New York Times. Last year, we wrote on his last five films films, Napalm and The Four Sisters, a quartet of documentaries.Recommended VIEWINGEven through his perhaps more artistically compromised mainland blockbusters, we remain dedicated fans of Tsui Hark's daring, punk cinematic vision. We especially highly regard his Detective Dee films, and thus are very excited for the forthcoming Detective Dee: The Four Heavenly Kings, which has received this ecstatic new trailer.An oddly modern trailer showcasing the new gorgeous restoration of Jacques Rivette's first masterpiece (starring Anna Karina!), The Nun (1966). In a qualitative sense, Yorgos Lanthimos' films
See full article at MUBI »

First Us trailer for ‘Let the Corpses Tan’

  • Nerdly
Belgian filmmakers Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani trade in the crushed velvet and creeping shadows of their giallo-worshiping first two films for blistering sun, creaking leather and raining bullets in Let The Corpses Tan, a glorious homage to 1970s Italian crime films.

After stealing a truckload of gold bars, a gang of thieves absconds to the ruins of a remote village perched on the cliffs of the Mediterranean. Home to a reclusive yet hypersexual artist and her motley crew of family and admirers, it seems like a perfect hideout. But when two cops roll up on motorcycles to investigate, the hamlet erupts into a hallucinatory battlefield as both sides engage in an all-day, all-night firefight rife with double-crosses and dripping with blood.

Based on a classic pulp novel by Jean-Patrick Manchette and featuring music by Ennio Morricone, Let the Corpses Tan is a deliriously stylish, cinematic fever dream that will
See full article at Nerdly »

Let The Corpses Tan Movie Trailer: A Quentin Tarantino-like Action Thriller; Score by Ennio Morricone

Let The Corpses Tan Trailer

Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzan‘s Let The Corpses Tan / Laissez bronzer les cadavres (2017) movie trailer stars Elina Löwensohn, Stéphane Ferrara, Hervé Sogne, Bernie Bonvoisin, and Pierre Nisse. Let The Corpses Tan‘s plot synopsis: based on the novel by Jean-Patrick Manchette, “Belgian filmmakers Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani trade in [...]

Continue reading: Let The Corpses Tan Movie Trailer: A Quentin Tarantino-like Action Thriller; Score by Ennio Morricone

The post Let The Corpses Tan Movie Trailer: A Quentin Tarantino-like Action Thriller; Score by Ennio Morricone appeared first on FilmBook.
See full article at Film-Book »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed