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Review: ‘Under the Tree’ is a Darkly Absurd Comedy of Errors

If humans weren’t always the pettiest creatures on Earth, we’ve definitely earned the title this past century. Just think about how often you find yourself asking the question, “Let’s see what they’ll do about this?” I don’t mean hypothetically either. I’m talking about truly contemplating your next smugly biting (until an inevitable escalation leads you towards unforgivably heinous) act of vengeance to counter whatever your latest opponent in life has delivered. Eventually we forget how our duel began because our desperation to achieve a win proves too powerful to accept anything else. I’m sure this mindset has been exacerbated by newfound convenience through technology because things that used to occupy our time have been streamlined or replaced. The resulting boredom ignites an unquenchable desire for triumphant satisfaction.

What’s worse is that our opponents very often become people we cannot avoid. Our own
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'Under The Tree', 'Prisoners' win big at Iceland's Edda Awards

'Under The Tree', 'Prisoners' win big at Iceland's Edda Awards
Iceland-Poland-Denmark-Germany co-pro picks up seven awards including best film and best director.

Under The Tree and Prisoners were the big winners at Iceland’s Edda Awards on Sunday.

The film won seven awards: best film, best director (Hafsteinn Gunnar Sigurðsson), best actress (Edda Björgvinsdóttir), best actor (Steinþór Hróar Steinþórsson), supporting actor (Sigurður Sigurjónsson), best original screenplay (Huldar Breiðfjörð and Sigurðsson), and best special effects (The Gentlemen Broncos).

Ragnar Bragason’s Ruv series Prisoners took home the most gongs, with 10 awards including best TV series and most popular TV series, plus awards for sound, music, editing, cinematography, costumes, make-up, art direction and best supporting actress.

Baldvin Z won best documentary for Beyond Strength, about an Icelandic strongman, while best short film went to Atelier by Elsa María Jakobsdóttir.

Best children’s programme went to Guðrún Ragnarsdóttir’s Summer Children, which premiered in Tallinn Black Nights.

Under The Tree, an Iceland-Poland-Denmark-Germany co-production, premiered in Venice
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'Under The Tree' wins big at Iceland's Edda Awards

'Under The Tree' wins big at Iceland's Edda Awards
Iceland-Poland-Denmark-Germany co-pro picks up seven awards including best film and best director.

Under The Tree was the big winner at Iceland’s Edda Awards on Sunday.

The film won seven awards: best film, best director (Hafsteinn Gunnar Sigurðsson), best actress (Edda Björgvinsdóttir), best actor (Steinþór Hróar Steinþórsson), supporting actor (Sigurður Sigurjónsson), best original screenplay (Huldar Breiðfjörð and Sigurðsson) and best special effects (The Gentlemen Broncos).

Baldvin Z won best documentary for Beyond Strength, about an Icelandic strongman, while Best Short Film went to Atelier by Elsa María Jakobsdóttir.

Best Children’s programme went to Guðrún Ragnarsdóttir’s Summer Children, which premiered in Tallinn Black Nights.

On the TV side, Ragnar Bragason’s Ruv series Prisoners won 10 prizes.

Under The Tree, an Iceland-Poland-Denmark-Germany co-production, premiered in Venice Orizzonti before going to Toronto; the film went on to win awards in the Hamptons, Zurich and Fantastic Fest, among others. The dark comedy/tragedy was Iceland’s submission for the foreign-language
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Hafsteinn Gunnar Sigurðsson, Paris of the North

Hafsteinn Gunnar Sigurðsson, Paris of the North
After seeing his debut feature Either Way remade into Us film Prince Avalanche, director and writer Hafsteinn Gunnar Sigurðsson talks to Laurence Boyce about his second feature, which receives its world premiere in Karlovy Vary.

Icelandic director Hafsteinn Gunnar Sigurðsson’s debut feature Either Way was an affecting and quirky exploration of the relationship between two road painters who live an isolated existence as they discuss life and women in the vastness of the Icelandic countryside.

Proving popular on the festival circuit, the film would go on to be remade by David Gordon Green as Prince Avalanche with Paul Rudd and Emilie Hirsch in the leads.

Now Sigurðsson’s second feature, Paris of the North, is set to have its world premiere in the Karlovy Vary International Competition. Filled with deadpan humour and a brilliant soundtrack, Sigurðsson once again tells a story of two people forced together in isolated surroundings.

Here Hugi, a
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