News

Insights: Disney’s Latest Maker Move Punctuates End Of Multi-Channel Network Era

Disney’s announcement this week that it's launching a new digital network, and tucking away its former high-profile Maker Studios acquisition, brings to a whimpering end an entire era of multi-channel network mania that gripped media companies just a couple of years ago. Good. It’s time to move to the next stage of the digital-media business, one with promise of a more sustainable future.

Maker was the biggest, brashest, and most expensive of the MCNs to be purchased by a traditional media company in the first half of this decade. Since its acquisition, however, Maker and the McN phenomenon have already become web Ancient History.

As seen in this week’s string of NewFronts presentations by increasingly sophisticated digital-media publishers old and new, it’s time for the industry to take that next step.

Yes, the online advertising business continues to be dominated by Google/YouTube and Facebook (between
See full article at Tubefilter News »

'The World's End' Inspirations & The Perfect Pint

'The World's End' Inspirations & The Perfect Pint
The World's End lands in theaters everywhere on Friday, and the Edgar Wright alien-invasion/drinking comedy featuring Simon Pegg, Nick Frost, Martin Freeman, Rosamund Pike and Pierce Brosnan draws on a number of cinematic inspirations, from Invasion of the Body Snatchers-style sci-fi classics to The Big Chill-styled reunion movies. In fact, Wright recently assembled 14 fave influences (several of which are listed below) in a thematic, double-feature screening series at the New Beverly Cinema in Los Angeles to get audiences in the proper frame of mind.

Related Video: The Beginning of 'The World's End' at Comic-Con

The World's End follows a group of friends (including Paddy Considine and Eddie Marsan) who embark on an epic 12-pub crawl in their hometown in an effort to complete "The Golden Mile," having fallen short two decades earlier when they were teens in their prime. Back to finish what they started, the reunited
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Paddy Considine: five best moments

Here's our pick of the actor's greatest scenes – but what would you add to the list?

Currently appearing alongside Simon Pegg and Nick Frost in The World's End, Paddy Considine is equally at home in comedy roles as he is playing dangerous, unhinged characters. It's not for nothing that he's known as Britain's Robert De Niro – and with his 2011 directorial debut Tyrannosaur, he ably demonstrated he's more than just a talented character actor.

Here's five of our favourite Paddy Considine moments, including suggestions from @guardianmusic followers @philgirlworld, @thetomweller, @kinnemaniac, ‏@BassTunedToRed and ‏@ChantelleDusett. But what have we missed? Let us know in the thread below.

1. 24 Hour Party People

Paddy plays Joy Division and New Order manager Rob Gretton in Michael Winterbottom's tribute to Factory Records and the Manchester music scene. In this scene, Rob's less-than-pleased with Tony Wilson's spending on office furniture.

Reading on mobile? Watch the clip on
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Steve Coogan can't escape Alan Partridge in The Look of Love

The actor's attempt to play Soho sex king Paul Raymond should have worked on paper – they share a similar look and mannerisms – but there is only one role he can play

Steve Coogan looks a bit like Paul Raymond; the two men even share the same adenoidal tic. So Coogan ought to be better placed to play Raymond in a biopic than, say, Meryl Streep was, to play Thatcher. Yet during The Look of Love, it's not the legendary entrepreneur of erotica who fills the screen: it's Alan Partridge.

The character's gestures, mannerisms and intonation hail from the Norwich ring road, not Walker's Court. More importantly, so does his soul. The Look of Love seeks to portray its protagonist as a libertine tragically confounded by doomed paternal love. Coogan's Raymond meets his daughter's demise with an agonised show of remorse; yet his pained expression doesn't have you reaching for your hanky.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Steve Coogan can't escape Alan Partridge in The Look of Love

The actor's attempt to play Soho sex king Paul Raymond should have worked on paper – they share a similar look and mannerisms – but there is only one role he can play

Steve Coogan looks a bit like Paul Raymond; the two men even share the same adenoidal tic. So Coogan ought to be better placed to play Raymond in a biopic than, say, Meryl Streep was, to play Thatcher. Yet during The Look of Love, it's not the legendary entrepreneur of erotica who fills the screen: it's Alan Partridge.

The character's gestures, mannerisms and intonation hail from the Norwich ring road, not Walker's Court. More importantly, so does his soul. The Look of Love seeks to portray its protagonist as a libertine tragically confounded by doomed paternal love. Coogan's Raymond meets his daughter's demise with an agonised show of remorse; yet his pained expression doesn't have you reaching for your hanky.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

IFC Picks Up Steve Coogan's The Look of Love

It didn't take long for Steve Coogan and Michael Winterbottom's fourth collaboration The Look of Love , based on the life of London club owner and porn publisher Paul Raymond, known as "The King of Soho," to get scooped up by IFC Films who bought the North American rights on Sunday night. Previously Coogan starred in Winterbottom's 24 Hour Party People about Factory Records owner Tony Wilson, and then teamed with Winterbottom and Rob Brydon for Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story and 2011's The Trip . This will be Winterbottom's fourth film in a row to be distributed by IFC Films following The Killer Inside Me , The Trip and last year's Trishna . In between, Winterbottom finished his five-year dramatic project Everyday , which premiered at the Telluride...
See full article at Comingsoon.net »

Trailer Trash

Madchester inches towards the West End, Ken Loach demonstrates the wonder of socialism, and Kathryn Bigelow can't tell one London bus from another

Rave on stage

Long shot as it may be – and Trash loves a long shot – I hear there are plans to turn Madchester film comedy 24 Hour Party People into a stage musical. The film's director, Michael Winterbottom, told me that he and producer Andrew Eaton have been toying with the idea for several years and that there is even a rough script "floating around". Steve Coogan is apparently interested in reprising his part as the lead. The show would tell the story of Factory Records, its founder, Tony Wilson, and the rise and fall of bands including Joy Division, Buzzcocks, A Certain Ratio and Happy Mondays. I'd personally love to see some genteel West End theatre transformed into a hands-in -the-air, tops-off sweatbox for a while, throbbing
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Top 50 modern day low budget movies

We salute 50 of the finest contemporary films with budgets of less than $10million. Did your favourite make the list…?

In this age of multi-million dollar blockbusters and eye-watering fees paid to some actors, you may forget we’re in an age of austerity. However, for the vast majority of the film industry, there is no huge vat of money, nor has there ever been. But this hasn’t stopped some of the finest films of recent years being made on a relative shoe-string, and in some cases, quite literally with a shoe-string.

I reckon filmmaking thrives at the sharp end, and low budgets mean more creative ideas, and as a result, more engaging films. To prove this, here is a list of what I consider to be the finest 50 contemporary films made for under $10 million. There is a breathtaking array of recognisable genre pictures in here, too, with budgets rangin
See full article at Den of Geek »

TV highlights 23/09/2011

Outnumbered | New Order: Their Story | Dci Banks | Cats | Modern Family | An Idiot Abroad

Outnumbered

9pm, BBC1

There have been sceptical noises made about the latest series, suggesting that it's lapsing into self-parody and dull convention. However, it remains by a long distance the finest mainstream British sitcom of recent years. Tonight's isn't the strongest episode, mind, revolving around the parents' evening for Ben, who at 11 is emerging as a distinctly unusual boy. Meanwhile, we see Karen undergo a rare moment of hurt. Stick with this series; it ends magnificently. David Stubbs

New Order: Their Story

9pm, Sky Arts 1

With Peter Hook performing Joy Division albums live around the world, and three quarters of New Order deciding to get back together without him, band relations aren't exactly peachy at the moment. Better, then, to look back on friendlier times with this excellent 1993 documentary, in which Hook, Bernard Sumner and Stephen Morris,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The Trip

The Trip

Directed by: Michael Winterbottom

Cast: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Claire Keelan, Margo Stilley

Running Time: 1 hr 47 mins

Rating: R

Release Date: June 17, 2011 (Portland)

Plot: The Observer asks Steve Coogan to tour England’s finest restaurants. When his girlfriend can’t make it, Rob Brydon, his friend and annoyance, joins him.

Who’S It For? If you are a fans of Coogan, Brydon or comedians in general this little film will be a nice fit.

Overall

Rob says, “It’s 2010, everything’s been done before.” Well, this hasn’t.

Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon play versions of themselves. They travel. They eat. Most importantly, they chat.

This is a film that attempts to feel like a documentary. While Rob looks familiar, I never watched the TV show “Little Britain” and I still haven’t seen the film Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story . I knew Steve as the
See full article at Scorecard Review »

Bandmate Describes Rock Legend's Suicide: I Feel Guiltier Than Ever

Bandmate Describes Rock Legend's Suicide: I Feel Guiltier Than Ever
Ian Curtis famously sang "Love Will Tear Us Apart," his voice haunting through radios as he rested, finally, in a grave of his own tragic making. The lead singer of Joy Division, the 1980 single became the band's biggest hit, a post-humous reminder of what could have, should have been.

Curtis' bandmates, Peter Hook, Bernard Sumner and Stephen Morris, would go on to form mega-success and pioneering band New Order, but the memory of their friend, an epileptic and tortured soul who took his own life at the age of 23, has always haunted and inspired them.

The death of the icon checked in at number 22 on The Guardian's list of the 50 biggest events in the history of indie music, a sad distinction for which Hook, the band's bassist, penned a wistful article to commemorate.

"Ian was very ill with epilepsy when we were recording the 'Closer' album. He was having a lot of blackouts,
See full article at Huffington Post »

Steve Coogan and Michael Winterbottom to Collaborate Yet Again for ‘King of Soho’ Biopic

The ongoing collaboration between Steve Coogan and director Michael Winterbottom is the gift that keeping giving. They scored big on the small screen earlier this year with the fantastic six-part, two-hander comedy The Trip, having previously ventured into similar meta territory (and to great critical acclaim) with features 24 Hour Party People and A Cock and Bull Story.

Now The Playlist is reporting that the duo is set to reteam for an adaptation of the life of British pornographer and strip club owner Paul Raymond. Under the working title of Paul Raymond’s Wonderful World of Erotica (which sounds like it could have been one of Coogan’s comic creations for TV), the film will follow the fortunes of Raymond, a club proprietor and magazine magnate who was also an incredibly wealthy individual, owning vast amounts of property in London’s Soho area.

Raymond lived a colourful life which had its
See full article at HeyUGuys »

“I am not a lump of hash. I’m in charge of Factory Records. I think”…. 24 Hour Party People at Ritz this (Happy) Monday

The offending, underwhelming poster/DVD cover

“Most of all, I love Manchester. The crumbling warehouses, the railway arches, the cheap abundant drugs. That’s what did it in the end. Not the money, not the music, not even the guns. That is my heroic flaw: my excess of civic pride.” – Tony Wilson (Steve Coogan)

Maybe it’s the lame poster for the film, which does kind of make it look like a Trainspotting knock off about ravers, but Michael Winterbottom’s 24 Hour Party People is criminally under-appreciated.

Yes, ecstasy and warehouse parties do come into play, but the film is really the story of the Manchester music scene, circa 1976-1992 (all the way from the days of punk to the height of the “Mad-Chester” scene) as told by Factory Records founder Tony Wilson (the ever charming Steve Coogan).

The alternate poster/DVD box. Still not that great.

Inspired after catching a Sex Pistols gig,
See full article at AlamoDrafthouseCinema »

The Trip DVD Review

  • HeyUGuys
It must be frustrating being Steve Coogan. As the winner of numerous British Comedy and BAFTA awards (not to mention the 1992 Perrier Award, the 1997 Silver Rose of Montreux and a South Bank Show Award for his live show “The Man Who Thinks He’s It”) he’s also been listed amongst the 50 funniest acts working in British comedy as well as featuring in the Top 20 greatest comedy acts of all time as voted for by fellow comedians.

He’s forged himself a moderately successful Hollywood career and starred in a number of successful films from the likes of Sofia Coppola, Ben Stiller, Jim Jarmusch, Adam McKay and Frank Oz and starred alongside such names as Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg, Jackie Chan, Owen Wilson and Kirsten Dunst. And to top it all off he’s even founded his own production company, Baby Cow Productions, which itself has given birth to such
See full article at HeyUGuys »

In praise of... Michael Winterbottom

Winterbottom has shown a determination to carry on making interesting films regardless of whether they fill multiplexes or not

Say this for Michael Winterbottom: he's a grafter. Eighteen films in 16 years and a new TV series, The Trip, just started on BBC2. For a British director, such numbers reflect something bigger than productivity – they demonstrate a determination to carry on in an industry marked by low (and falling) budgets. You might expect this to produce timid, samey films, but not in Winterbottom's case. His work skips across genres and styles: sci-fi (Code 46), western (The Claim), literary adaptation (A Cock and Bull Story), war (Welcome to Sarajevo). "It would be hard to imagine a Michael Winterbottom comedy," observed one Guardian journalist, but that was before the release of 24 Hour Party People, the film history of Factory Records in which God turns up to ask label boss Tony Wilson why
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan: 'We're not the big buddies people think we are'

The comedians play companions in their new TV series, The Trip. But their real-life relationship runs far from smoothly

It is somewhere in the region of lunchtime at the Inn at Whitewell, and from the dining room carries the gentle roar of the feast: spoons brush soup plates, wine glasses kiss, and conversation gathers and swells. Outside, it is a sharp, bright day and here in the Trough of Bowland, the light skims across the bare branches and seems to settle among the hills of the Hodder Valley.

Back indoors, sitting beside the log fire, is the comedian Rob Brydon. He is sipping a glass of red wine and surveying the local newspaper, pausing, occasionally, to bask in the warmth.

Into his post-prandial idyll stalks Steve Coogan; taller, sharper, slightly harried, he sits down heavily and scowls. Brydon, impervious, lowers his newspaper. "I have ordered you a sticky toffee pudding,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan: 'We're not the big buddies people think we are'

The comedians play companions in their new TV series, The Trip. But their real-life relationship runs far from smoothly

It is somewhere in the region of lunchtime at the Inn at Whitewell, and from the dining room carries the gentle roar of the feast: spoons brush soup plates, wine glasses kiss, and conversation gathers and swells. Outside, it is a sharp, bright day and here in the Trough of Bowland, the light skims across the bare branches and seems to settle among the hills of the Hodder Valley.

Back indoors, sitting beside the log fire, is the comedian Rob Brydon. He is sipping a glass of red wine and surveying the local newspaper, pausing, occasionally, to bask in the warmth.

Into his post-prandial idyll stalks Steve Coogan; taller, sharper, slightly harried, he sits down heavily and scowls. Brydon, impervious, lowers his newspaper. "I have ordered you a sticky toffee pudding,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Making biopics: What's truth got to do with it?

Is it acceptable for biopics to make things up – and even tell lies? Ryan Gilbey speaks to the film-makers and screenwriters who are shaking up the genre

In the opening credits of Gainsbourg, a new biopic about the legendary French singer, chain-smoker and lothario, the star is shown swimming among fish who are all puffing away on cigarettes. A little later, Gainsbourg is menaced by a four-armed monster who has sprung from a Nazi propaganda poster. Then there's the small matter of him being followed around by a life-size puppet that only he can see.

This, you realise, is not your run-of-the-mill biopic. And Gainsbourg is not the only example of how the genre is being shaken up. It used to be all about sticking to the truth, with a conventional narrative: they're born, they live, they die. Now biopics are using invention, and even lies, to tell their stories.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Chris Sievey obituary

Musician, entertainer and alter ego of the cult comedy creation Frank Sidebottom

Chris Sievey, who has died aged 54 after suffering from cancer, achieved the kind of success as Frank Sidebottom that often eluded him under his own name. Sidebottom, complete with papier-mâché head and a curious line in daft Bontempi songs, became a huge hit on the 1980s indie circuit, shoring up his fame through a series of television and radio shows. He was an inspired creation, a nasal-voiced pop star from the Cheshire seat of Timperley, releasing records in praise of his home village and oompah-muzak covers of old classics. His popularity peaked in the early 1990s, with the TV series Frank Sidebottom's Fantastic Shed Show and guest slots on the children's Saturday morning ITV show No 73.

Sievey himself grew up in Ashton-on-Mersey, five miles from Timperley. The audacious beginnings of a pop career got under way in
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Hot Docs 2010 Wrap-Up and Capsule Reviews

This year's Hot Docs [1] festival ended a couple of weeks ago, and and only now have we finally managed to purge our thoughts on the many documentaries that we've seen this year. Jay put up a much more comprehensive post over on The Documentary Blog [2], but I have taken a selection of these reviews and reposted them here for your convenience. If you like what you see, be sure to head over there and read the rest. Also, don't forget to check out previous reviews of the following films: Teenage Paparazzo [3] The People vs. George Lucas [4] Gasland [5] Arsy-Versy [6] Rush: Beyond the Lighted Stage [7] American: The Bill Hicks Story [8] The Invention of Dr Nakamats [9] 12th & Delaware [10] The Oath [11] Secrets of the Tribe [12] Capsule reviews for more films including Steven Soderbergh's And Everything is Going Fine, Chris Hegedus and D.A. Pennebaker's Kings of Pastry, and the David Lynch transcendental meditation
See full article at FilmJunk »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed