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Gustave Kervern and Benoît Delépine shooting Effacer l’historique - Production / Funding - France/Belgium

Blanche Gardin, Denis Podalydès and Corinne Masiero topline this production being staged by Les Films du Worso and sold by Wild Bunch. The shoot for Effacer l’historique (lit. “Delete the History”) by Gustave Kervern and Benoît Delépine has been in full swing since 29 July. This is the ninth feature by the directorial duo, following I Feel Good (unveiled on the Piazza Grande at last year’s Locarno Film Festival), Saint Amour (out of competition at Berlin in 2016), Nde (Near Death Experience), Le grand soir (Un Certain Regard at Cannes in 2012), Mammuth (in competition at the 2010 Berlinale), Louise-Michel (Best Screenplay Award at San Sebastián in 2008 and Special Jury Prize at Sundance in 2009), Avida (out of competition at Cannes in 2006) and Aaltra (in competition at Rotterdam in 2004). As for the cast of their new opus, the...
See full article at Cineuropa »

Christophe Honoré and Vincent Lacoste on ‘Sorry Angel’ and Responding to a New Wave of Homophobia

“I mostly read dead writers,” Arthur says. Jacques teases back, “You won’t need to wait long.” The many types of relationships, friendships, and the ways the two transform are explored in Christophe Honoré’s new film Sorry Angel. In this scene, the two lovers discourse as if they were student and teacher, weaving multiple aspects of their relationship: their age difference, common interests, and Jacques’ known status as H.I.V. positive into two lines of dialogue.

We spoke with filmmaker Honoré and one of his lead actors, Vincent Lacoste at the 56th New York Film Festival. Honoré discusses Sorry Angel’s aesthetic manifesto and the new wave of international homophobia that influenced him to tell this story now. Lacoste discusses his character Arthur’s relationship with Nadine (Adèle Wismes), his lover prior to Jacques (Pierre Deladonchamps) and the idea Honoré presents that Arthur, Jacques and Mathieu (Denis Podalydès
See full article at The Film Stage »

César Nominations: Jacques Audiard’s ‘Sisters Brothers’ Rustles Up Nine – List

  • Deadline
César Nominations: Jacques Audiard’s ‘Sisters Brothers’ Rustles Up Nine – List
France’s Académie des Arts et Techniques du Cinéma unveiled its nominations for the César Awards this morning in Paris. The races for the country’s Oscar equivalent are led by Xavier Legrand’s feature debut Jusqu’à La Garde (Custody) and Gilles Lellouche’s Le Grand Bain (Sink Or Swim) with 10 mentions each. They are followed by Jacques Audiard’s English-language western, The Sisters Brothers, and Pierre Salvadori’s En Liberté! (The Trouble With You) with nine a piece. All four are in the Best Picture and Director categories.

There’s a noticeably lighter edge to the nominations this year with Le Grand Bain a sort of Full Monty à la française that sees a group of middle-aged men form a synchronized swimming team. The movie debuted out of competition in Cannes and became the 3rd highest grossing local title of 2018 with over 5M tickets sold.

Also out of Cannes,
See full article at Deadline »

New Us Trailer for Christophe Honoré's 'Sorry Angel' Set in 90s Paris

"We could make a good life together." Strand Releasing has unveiled an official Us trailer for the French drama Sorry Angel, which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival last year and played at numerous other fests in late 2018. The original French titled is Plaire, aimer et courir vite, which translates (literally) to Pleasure, Love and Run Fast. Set in the 1990s in Paris, this queer romp brings us into the lives of three French men who hook up and make love and talk about life and love in the midst of the AIDS crisis. Jacques is an older writer from Paris. Arthur is a young student in Rennes. They instantly fall in love. But they'll have to face rejection and sickness to stay that way. Starring Vincent Lacoste, Pierre Deladonchamps, Denis Podalydès. This premiered to mixed reviews in Cannes, and is a bit dry at times; I much prefer the
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Honoré goes back to the future by Richard Mowe

Sorry Angel. Christophe Honoré: 'To be honest the characters of Arthur and Jacques I see as myself at different stages in my life. It might seem narcissistic to have a character at 40 who falls in love with himself (me) at 20 but it wasn’t intended to be' Photo: Courtesy of Cannes Film Festival

Back at the Cannes Film Festival and only his second time in the Competition, French director Christophe Honoré has also played in the Directors’ Fortnight with Dans Paris (2006). His tenth feature Sorry Angel sees Stranger By The Lake‘s Pierre Deladonchamps hook up with the younger Vincent Lacoste and and the older Denis Podalydès in a doomed love story set in the 90s in Paris and Rennes, where Honoré was a student. Relaxing under the high bright Riviera sun on a pier at the Majestic Hotel’s beach, the day after the film’s well-received bow,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

2018 Cannes Critics’ Panel: Day 3 – Christophe Honoré’s Sorry Angel

Only his second time in the competition (he was there in 2007 with Les chansons d’amour), Christophe Honoré has moonlighted with the Cannes film festival — and he also played in the Directors’ Fortnight with Dans Paris (2006). His tenth feature film Sorry Angel which is an awkward translation from a much better Plaire, aimer et courir vite sees Stranger by the Lake‘s Pierre Deladonchamps match up with the younger Vincent Lacoste and the senior Denis Podalydès in this slice of life drama in set in the 90’s Paris.

An complementary film to last year’s comp offering Bpm, while a…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Sorry Angel’

  • Variety
Cannes Film Review: ‘Sorry Angel’
As any cinephile can tell you, there are some directors we love despite the fact they have never made a great film, but rather for the uniqueness of their voice and the hope that one day they will deliver on their potential. In the case of Christophe Honoré, his delightful “Love Songs” landed him on that list, even if no one would argue that the effervescent 2007 ménage-à-trois musical was a masterpiece, while every subsequent film has slightly chipped away at our affection.

Now, with “Sorry Angel”, Honoré at last makes good on our faith in his talent, flashing back to 1993 to deliver a deeply personal queer romance that combines his best qualities as a filmmaker, even as it splits his identity between two men at opposite ends of life, HIV-positive writer Jacques (Pierre Deladonchamps) and college-age reader Arthur (Vincent Lacoste), each falling in love with the idea of the other.
See full article at Variety »

Understanding Céline by Anne-Katrin Titze

Emmanuel Bourdieu on who could play Louis-Ferdinand Céline: "One is Denis Podalydès, who is my best friend. And the other was Denis Lavant whom I knew only as a fan." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

At the Film Society of Lincoln Center, Emmanuel Bourdieu, director and co-screenwriter of Louis-Ferdinand Céline (based on the book The Crippled Giant by Martin Hindus and starring Denis Lavant), spoke with me about the casting of the lead role, shooting in Belgium with cinematographer Marie Spencer and screenwriter Marcia Romano and editor Benoît Quinon on board, working with composer Grégoire Hetzel on creating a tune for a William Blake poem to characterize Philip Desmeules' portrayal of Hindus, and how Géraldine Pailhas helped with the costumes for Lucette (designed by Florence Scholtes and Christophe Pidre).

Denis Lavant as Louis-Ferdinand Céline with Bébert: "He could change the mood very very fast. And Denis knows how to do that.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Scribe (La mécanique de l’ombre) movie review: all tapped out

MaryAnn’s quick take… This would-be faux-70s paranoid thriller piles on too-obvious intrigue and embarrassing clichés, and lacks suspense, thrills, and a protagonist to care about. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Unemployed accountant Duval (François Cluzet) takes a mysterious job with mysterious Clément (Denis Podalydès) that comes about after a mysterious late-night phone call and a mysterious Saturday-morning job interview (in a completely unmysteriously deserted Parisian business district, because it’s the weekend, but there’s nothing odd about that, nosirree). The job — transcribing recordings of conversations from tapped phones — comes with mysterious strict instructions about confidentiality and secrecy and mysteriously bizarre instructions about (among other things) the appropriate timing of the opening and closing of the blinds in the near-empty apartment he’ll be working in.

Such mysterious. Many intrigue.

Scribe piles on too-obvious intrigue,
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Scribe Review

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Daniel Goodwin

Writer/director Thomas Kruithof’s French, forceful debut feature recalls classic conspiracy thrillers such as The Parallax View, All The Presidents Men and Marathon Man, while standing matchless amongst its predecessors due to inherent timeless qualities; stark realism, bleak cinematography and an ability to efficiently subvert/meld several sub-genre styles and components. Mostly resembling Coppola’s The Conversation due to the nature of protagonist Duval (comfortably alone, introvert), similar to Gene Hackman’s Harry Caul, along with his comparable occupation and the central story of a Government surveyor/transcriber in over his head. Scribe also incorporates traits from 90s political thrillers with conspiratorial sub-plots about corrupt officials with ulterior motives. Meanwhile the subtle suggestion of grittier, higher octane latter Bond and Bourne films slightly informs its style, augmented by a lo/sci-fi edge and embellished by the score.

François Cluzet plays Duval, a recovering alcoholic, ex-office clerk,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Cannes Critics' Week title 'Ava' clocks deals for Bac

Cannes Critics' Week title 'Ava' clocks deals for Bac
Exclusive: French outfit also scores sales on The Teacher and The Third Wave.

French sales company Bac Films is reporting strong interest for French director Léa Mysius’s debut feature Ava [pictured], which premiered to packed theatres in Critics’ Week at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.

The title has sold to Australia and New Zealand (Madman Entertainment), China (Lemon Tree), Taiwan (Catchplay), Switzerland (Praesens), and Turkey (Filmarti).

Bac sales chief Gilles Sousa said there was strong interest from several other territories, notably Benelux, Germany and the Us.

The picture, which is in the running for Cannes Caméra d’Or as a first-time feature, stars rising French actress Laure Calamy as a teenager who is losing her sight and embarks on a momentous summer and steals a big black dog.

Other new Bac titles drawing buyers include Olivier Ayache-Vidal’s feel-good tale The Teacher starring Denis Podalydès as a teacher seconded to a tough school who strikes-up an unlikely
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes Critics' Week premiere 'Ava' clocks deals for Bac

Cannes Critics' Week premiere 'Ava' clocks deals for Bac
Exclusive: French outfit also scores sales on The Teacher and The Third Wave.

French sales company Bac Films is reporting strong interest for French director Léa Mysius’s debut feature Ava [pictured], which premiered to packed theatres in Critics’ Week at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.

The title has sold to Australia and New Zealand (Madman Entertainment), China (Lemon Tree), Taiwan (Catchplay), Switzerland (Praesens), and Turkey (Filmarti).

Bac sales chief Gilles Sousa said there was strong interest from several other territories, notably Benelux, Germany and the Us.

The picture, which is in the running for Cannes Caméra d’Or as a first-time feature, stars rising French actress Laure Calamy as a teenager who is losing her sight and embarks on a momentous summer and steals a big black dog.

Other new Bac titles drawing buyers include Olivier Ayache-Vidal’s feel-good tale The Teacher starring Denis Podalydès as a teacher seconded to a tough school who strikes-up an unlikely
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Nyff Sets World Premiere of Ang Lee’s ‘Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk’

The already-incredible line-up for the 2016 New York Film Festival just got even more promising. Ang Lee‘s Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk will hold its world premiere at the festival on October 14th, the NY Times confirmed today. The adaptation of Ben Fountain‘s Iraq War novel, with a script by Simon Beaufoy (Slumdog Millionaire), follows a teenage soldier who survives a battle in Iraq and then is brought home for a victory lap before returning.

Lee has shot the film at 120 frames per second in 4K and native 3D, giving it unprecedented clarity for a feature film, which also means the screening will be held in a relatively small 300-seat theater at AMC Lincoln Square, one of the few with the technology to present it that way. While it’s expected that this Lincoln Square theater will play the film when it arrives in theaters, it may be
See full article at The Film Stage »

Toronto Film Festival 2013 Further Additions

The Toronto International Film Festival® has announced the addition of 3 Galas and 19 Special Presentations to the 2013 Festival programme, including a further 12 World Premieres. Representing countries from around the world, the Gala and Special Presentations programmes offer a lineup of diverse titles and genres.

Toronto audiences will be among the first to screen films by directors Fred Schepisi, Alberto Arvelo, Reha Erdem, Dexter Fletcher, Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland, Megan Griffiths, Arnaud Larrieu and Jean-Marie Larrieu, Kevin Macdonald, Arie Posin, Charlie Stratton, Nils Tavernier and John Turturro.

The 38th Toronto International Film Festival runs September 5 to 15, 2013.

Galas Blood Ties

Guillaume Canet, France/USA North American Premiere

New York, 1974. 50-year-old Chris has just been released on good behavior after spending several years in prison. Waiting for him reluctantly outside the prison gates is his younger brother, Frank, a cop with a bright future. Chris and Frank have always been different, yet blood
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Review: Alain Resnais' 'You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet!'

Alain Resnais is no stranger to the absurd. For over fifty years, his films—beginning with “Hiroshima, Mon Amour,” have asked questions through their oblique narratives about the way we think about story, performance, and cinema. But such a serious statement also obscures the pure delight it is to get lost in the filmmaker’s lush imagery and his pure sense of magic. Surrealism can spark at any moment, and never feels unnatural. And in “You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet!,” the filmmaker’s purported last film, he’s gone to new wild imaginations of delight, a true send off from one generation of cinematic legends to the next. It is funny, then, that a film so full of warmth and energy might begin with a death. The opening images show the legends of French cinema receiving a phone call telling them their friend, the playwright Antoine d’Anthac (Denis Podalydès,
See full article at The Playlist »

You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet Movie Review

  • ShockYa
You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet Movie Review
Title: You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet (Vous n’avez encore rien vu) Kino Lorber Director: Alain Resnais Screenwriter: Laurent Herbiet, Alex Reval, based on Jean Anouilh’s “Eurydice” and “Dear Antoine” Cast: Mathieu Amalric, Pierre Arditi, Sabine Azéma, Jean-Noël Bouté, Anne Cosigny, Denis Podalydès, Hippolyte Girardot, Michel Piccoli, Lambert Wilson Screened at: Review 1, NYC, 5/28/13 Opens: June 7, 2013 If you’re a fan of theater—and I mean cerebral theater, not “Cats” or “The Lion King”—you may have run across Luigi Pirandello’s 1921 play “Six Characters in Search of an Author,” one of the best examples of metatheater. In that imaginative work, an acting company prepares to rehearse the play “The Rules [ Read More ]

The post You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

César Awards Nominations Announced!

The nominations for the César Awards aka the French Oscars were announced. "Farewell, My Queen," "Amour," "Camille Redouble," "In the House," "Rust & Bone," "Holy Motors," and "What's My Name" are competing for the Best Picture category. We'll find out the winners on February 22nd.

Here's the full list of nominees of the 2013 César Awards:

Best Picture

Farewell, My Queen

Amour

Camille Redouble

In The House

Rust & Bone

Holy Motors

What.s In A Name

Best Director

Benoît Jacquot, Farewell, My Queen

Michael Haneke, Amour

Noémie Lvovsky, Camille Redouble

François Ozon, In The House

Jacques Audiard, Rust & Bone

Leos Carax, Holy Motors

Stéphane Brizé, Quelques Heures De Printemps

Best Actress

Catherine Frot, Les Sauveurs Du Palais

Marion Cotillard, Rust & Bone

Noémie Lvovsky, Camille Redouble

Corinne Masiero, Louise Wimmer

Emmanuelle Riva, Amour

Léa Seydoux, Farewell, My Queen

Hélène Vincent, Quelques Heures De Printemps

Best Actor

Jean-Pierre Bacri, Cherchez Hortense

Patrick Bruel, What
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

Nyff: Alain Resnais’ ‘You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet’ Offers A Bevy of French Talent But Remains at a Surface Level

Alain Resnais’ You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet bears the director’s typical rumination on memory and loss, touching the themes on his cerebral earlier offerings like Hiroshima Mon Amour, Last Year at Marienbad, or his latest, Wild Grass. In his latest work, several famous French actors gather at the home of a deceased playwright who penned a play that they all starred in at one time or another. As they watch a recent filmed version of the play, they end up getting sucked back into the their former roles. Even though the film is brimming with French talent and with Resnais’ legacy of filmmaking, it never quite adds up to a satisfying whole. The film is perhaps too self-aware and never quite makes it past the surface. The film’s plot is rather simple. Esteemed French actors Mathieu Almaric, Pierre Arditi, Sabine Azéma, Jean-Noël Brouté, Anne Consigny, Anne Duperey, Hippolyte Girardot
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Nyff Review: Alain Resnais Makes A Delightful Final Film With 'You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet!'

Alain Resnais is no stranger to the absurd. For over fifty years, his films—beginning with “Hiroshima, Mon Amour,” have asked questions through their oblique narratives about the way we think about story, performance, and cinema. But such a serious statement also obscures the pure delight it is to get lost in the filmmaker’s lush imagery and his pure sense of magic. Surrealism can spark at any moment, and never feels unnatural. And in “You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet!,” the filmmaker’s purported last film, he’s gone to new wild imaginations of delight, a true send off from one generation of cinematic legends to the next. It is funny, then, that a film so full of warmth and energy might begin with a death. The opening images show the legends of French cinema receiving a phone call telling them their friend, the playwright Antoine d’Anthac (Denis Podalydès,
See full article at The Playlist »

Curious acquires Cannes Grand Prix winner Reality

Curious Distribution has picked up Matteo Garrone’s film Reality which won the Grand Prix at Cannes Film Festival Competition.

The announcement:

Curious Distribution has announced the acquisition of the Cannes Film Festival Competition Grand Prix-winner Reality and Director’s Fortnight selection Granny’s Funeral.

Reality was acquired from Fandango Portobello and Granny’s Funeral from Wild Bunch.

Reality is written and directed by Matteo Garrone, whose acclaimed earlier film Gomorrah also won the Grand Prix at Cannes four years ago. The film is a biting satire on reality television and Italian culture. The film garnered strong critical reviews from Cannes.

Insidemovies said: “(a)… visionary dissection of an Italian society….(Reality) ..is the rare movie that has some of that old, classic Fellini insanity in its overheated blood.”

Granny’s Funeral is delightful French comedy about love, life and death directed by Bruno Podalydès and co-written by Bruno with his brother Denis Podalydès.
See full article at Encore Magazine »
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