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Bloody Spear At Mount Fuji Available on Blu-ray September 4th from Arrow Academy

Tomu Uchida’s Bloody Spear At Mount Fuji (1955) will be available on Blu-ray September 4th from Arrow Academy

Praised by Japanese film critics and much admired by his contemporaries Akira Kurosawa and Yasujirô Ozu, Tomu Uchida nonetheless remains a little-known in the west. His 1955 masterpiece Bloody Spear at Mount Fuji is an excellent entry point for the newcomer. Set during the Edo period, Bloody Spear at Mount Fuji is a tragicomic road movie of sorts, following a samurai, his two servants – including spear-carrier Genpachi (Chiezô Kataoka) – and the various people they meet on their journey, including a policeman in pursuit of a thief, a young child and a woman who is to be sold into prostitution. Winner of a prestigious Blue Ribbon Award for supporting actor – and Kurosawa regular – Daisuke Katô, Bloody Spear at Mount Fuji is a film deserving of much wider international recognition.

Bonus Materials High Definition Blu-ray
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Blu-ray Review: Frank Borzage's Moonrise Glows for Criterion

Director Frank Borzage was never one to wallow in the darkness. He made quality dramas, his work spanning from the silent era into the early 1960s. Although one of the major filmmakers in his earlier career, we don’t hear all that much of the cinematic imprints and impressions of Borzage today. Why is that? Sure, it’s true that any given canon is only so large, but Borzage is someone who was thoroughly respected, having won Academy Awards as Best Director twice (1929 for 7th Heaven and 1932 for Bad Girl), as well as displaying an undeniable authorial vision and distinct worldview. Like John Ford, Fritz Lang, and Yasujirô Ozu, Borzage started early enough and worked long enough that he witnessed numerous technical innovations and...

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Bloody Spear at Mount Fuji out on Blu-Ray September 3rd, 2018

Praised by Japanese film critics and much admired by his contemporaries Akira Kurosawa and Yasujirô Ozu, Tomu Uchida nonetheless remains a little-known in the west. His 1955 masterpiece Bloody Spear at Mount Fuji is an excellent entry point for the newcomer.

Set during the Edo period, “Bloody Spear at Mount Fuji” is a tragicomic road movie of sorts, following a samurai, his two servants – including spear-carrier Genpachi (Chiezô Kataoka) – and the various people they meet on their journey, including a policeman in pursuit of a thief, a young child and a woman who is to be sold into prostitution.

Winner of a prestigious Blue Ribbon Award for supporting actor – and Kurosawa regular – Daisuke Katô, Bloody Spear at Mount Fuji is a film deserving of much wider international recognition.

Special Edition Contents

High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) presentation

Original uncompressed mono audio

Optional newly translated English subtitles

Brand-new audio commentary
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Paul Schrader on Directing ‘First Reformed’ and Directing One of Ethan Hawke’s Best Performances [Interview]

Paul Schrader on Directing ‘First Reformed’ and Directing One of Ethan Hawke’s Best Performances [Interview]
Paul Schrader began his career in the movies as a film critic, but it wasn’t long before his Calvinist upbringing and his love of contemplative films from the likes of Yasujirô Ozu, Robert Bresson, and Carl Theodor Dreyer brought him to begin working as a screenwriter, mostly telling stories, mostly about lonely men in spiritual […]

The post Paul Schrader on Directing ‘First Reformed’ and Directing One of Ethan Hawke’s Best Performances [Interview] appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Hong Sang-soo’s 10 Favorite Films

With his nimble means of production resulting in some of the most formally profound, emotionally introspective films of this century thus far, South Korea’s ever-prolific Hong Sang-soo has carved out an impressive following here in the United States. Despite much of his earlier work not being distributed here, in recent years that has changed with Right Now, Wrong Then getting a release and now his deeply personal drama On the Beach at Night Alone will arrive this week, courtesy of Cinema Guild, who will also distribute his two other 2017 films — Claire’s Camera and The Day After — next year.

To celebrate the release, we’ve dug up his poll from the most recent BFI/Sight & Sound poll on the best films of all-time. Hong’s 10 picks range from classics such as L’Atalante, The Green Ray, A Man Escaped, and Ordet to lesser-known works from Jean Renoir and Luis Buñuel.
See full article at The Film Stage »

10 Great Directors Who Should Make Horror Movies — IndieWire Critics Survey

10 Great Directors Who Should Make Horror Movies — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What filmmaker would you most like to see try their hand at a horror movie?

Kristy Puchko (@KristyPuchko), Pajiba/Riot Material

I struggled with this question, because a lot of the directors I have adored have worked in horror, be it Tim Burton (“Beetlejuice,” “Edward Scissorhands”), Robert Zemeckis (“Death Becomes Her”), Edgar Wright (“Shawn of the Dead”), Frank Oz (“Little Shop of Horror”), Guillermo del Toro (“Crimson Peak”), Bong-Joon Ho (“The Host”), Jim Jarmusch (“Only Lovers Left Alive”), or Taika Waititi (“What We Do In the Shadows”). Part of what I love about the genre is the way is can be reshaped with vision, color,
See full article at Indiewire »

Episode 186 – Yasujiro Ozu’s An Autumn Afternoon

In this episode, David Blakeslee, Trevor Berrett and Matt Gasteier provide a conclusion to their conversations about “Late Ozu”, carried over from the final three episodes of The Eclipse Viewer podcast. They’re also joined by Scott Nye.

About the film:

The last film by Yasujiro Ozu was also his final masterpiece, a gently heartbreaking story about a man’s dignifed resignation to life’s shifting currents and society’s modernization. Though the widower Shuhei (frequent Ozu leading man Chishu Ryu) has been living comfortably for years with his grown daughter, a series of events leads him to accept and encourage her marriage and departure from their home. As elegantly composed and achingly tender as any of the Japanese master’s films, An Autumn Afternoon is one of cinema’s fondest farewells.

Episode Links Criterion Ozu-San American Cinematheque (Scott) Cinema Gadfly (Arik) Criterion Reflections (David) A/V Club Film Comment
See full article at CriterionCast »

Favorite Moments from Locarno Festival 2017: Confronting Death, Raúl Ruiz Returns, Japan Diaries

  • MUBI
The Wandering Soap OperaThis year at the Locarno Festival I am looking for specific images, moments, techniques, qualities or scenes from films across the 70th edition's selection that grabbed me and have lingered past and beyond the next movie seen, whose characters, story and images have already begun to overwrite those that came just before.***The camera’s brief tracking movements in Jacques Tourneur's Appointment in Honduras (1953). This filmmaker, to whom Locarno is devoting an extensive retrospective, is not a formalist like some of his more acclaimed contemporaries like John Ford, Otto Preminger, or Hitchcock, whose overt and idiosyncratic use of the camera makes far more obvious each director’s perspective on their stories. But that doesn't mean Tourneur didn't have formal flourishes, and none are so lyrically charged as the subtle and surprising times in his films when there’s a cut and suddenly the camera is floating
See full article at MUBI »

'Columbus' Review: Boy Meets Girl, Modern Architecture in Poetic Indie Debut

'Columbus' Review: Boy Meets Girl, Modern Architecture in Poetic Indie Debut
How do you make a ravishing romance about architecture? You'll find the answer with Kogonada, the video essayist and critic whose debut feature, Columbus, is a spellbinder. An immigrant from South Korea, the director sets his first film in Columbus, Indiana, a seemingly ordinary Midwestern town except for its exceptional modernist architecture, designed by such masters as Eero Saarinen and Harry Weese. Many townsfolk pass by these wonders without noticing. This mood-piece indie, however pays close attention, providing viewers with pristine images that brim with emotions ... the sort of agony
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Eclipse Viewer – Episode 60 – Late Ozu [Part 3]

http://criterioncast.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/60-Late-Ozu-Part-3.mp3

This podcast focuses on Criterion’s Eclipse Series of DVDs. Hosts David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett give an overview of each box and offer their perspectives on the unique treasures they find inside. In this final episode of a three-part series (and perhaps the podcast itself), David and Trevor are joined by Matt Gasteier to discuss two films (Late Autumn and The End of Summer) from Eclipse Series 3: Late Ozu.

About the films:

Master filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu directed fifty-three feature films over the course of his long career. Yet it was in the final decade of his life, his “old master” phase, that he entered his artistic prime. Centered more than ever on the modern sensibilities of the younger generation, these delicate family dramas are marked by an exquisite formal elegance and emotional sensitivity about birth and death, love and marriage, and
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Eclipse Viewer – Episode 59 – Late Ozu [Part 2]

http://criterioncast.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Eclipse-Viewer-Episode-59-Late-Ozu-Part-2.mp3

This podcast focuses on Criterion’s Eclipse Series of DVDs. Hosts David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett give an overview of each box and offer their perspectives on the unique treasures they find inside. In this second episode of a three-part series, David and Trevor are joined by Matt Gasteier to discuss the first three color films directed by Yasujiro Ozu: Equinox Flower, from Eclipse Series 3: Late Ozu, along with Good Morning and Floating Weeds. released as spine-numbered editions in the Criterion Collection.

About the films:

Master filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu directed fifty-three feature films over the course of his long career. Yet it was in the final decade of his life, his “old master” phase, that he entered his artistic prime. Centered more than ever on the modern sensibilities of the younger generation, these delicate family dramas are marked by an exquisite
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Eclipse Viewer – Episode 58 – Late Ozu [Part 1]

This podcast focuses on Criterion’s Eclipse Series of DVDs. Hosts David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett give an overview of each box and offer their perspectives on the unique treasures they find inside. In this first episode of a three-part series, David and Trevor are joined by Matthew Gasteier to discuss two films (Early Spring and Tokyo Twilight) from Eclipse Series 3: Late Ozu.

About the films:

Master filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu directed fifty-three feature films over the course of his long career. Yet it was in the final decade of his life, his “old master” phase, that he entered his artistic prime. Centered more than ever on the modern sensibilities of the younger generation, these delicate family dramas are marked by an exquisite formal elegance and emotional sensitivity about birth and death, love and marriage, and all the accompanying joys and loneliness. Along with such better-known films as Floating Weeds and An Autumn Afternoon,
See full article at CriterionCast »

All of the Films Joining Filmstruck’s Criterion Channel This July

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This July will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Saturday, July 1 Changing Faces

What does a face tell us even when it’s disguised or disfigured? And what does it conceal? Guest curator Imogen Sara Smith, a critic and author of the book In Lonely Places: Film Noir Beyond the City, assembles a series of films that revolve around enigmatic faces transformed by masks, scars, and surgery, including Georges Franju’s Eyes Without a Face (1960) and Hiroshi Teshigahara’s The Face of Another (1966).

Tuesday, July 4 Tuesday’s Short + Feature: Premature* and Ten*

Come hitch a ride with Norwegian director Gunhild Enger and the late Iranian master
See full article at CriterionCast »

Filmadrid & Mubi: The Video Essay—"永遠の処女 - The Eternal Virgin"

The Video Essay is a joint project of Mubi and Filmadrid Festival Internacional de Cine. Film analysis and criticism found a completely new and innovative path with the arrival of the video essay, a relatively recent form that already has its own masters and is becoming increasingly popular. The limits of this discipline are constantly expanding; new essayists are finding innovative ways to study the history of cinema working with images. With this non-competitive section of the festival both Mubi and Filmadrid will offer the platform and visibility the video essay deserves. The seven selected works will be shown during the dates of Filmadrid (June 8 - 17, 2017) on Mubi’s cinema publication, the Notebook. Also there will be a free public screening of the selected works during the festival. The selection was made by the programmers of Mubi and Filmadrid.永遠の処女 · The Eternal VirginVideo essay by Jorge Suárez-Quiñones RivasThe understanding of domestic,
See full article at MUBI »

Good Morning (ohayo)

It’s Yasujiro Ozu in light mode, except that his insights into the human social mechanism make this cheerful neighborhood comedy as meaningful as his dramas. Two boys go on a ‘talk strike’ because they want a television set, a choice that has an effect on everyone around them. And what can you say about a movie with running jokes about flatulence . . . and is still a world-class classic?

Good Morning

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 84

1959 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 94 min. / ohayo / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date May 16, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Keiji Sada, Yoshiko Kuga, Chishu Ryu, Kuniko Miyake, Haruko Sugimura, Koji Shitara, Masahiko Shimazu, Isamu Hayashi, Kyoko Izumi, Toyo Takahashi, Sadako Sawamura, Eijiro Tono.

Cinematography: Yushun Atsuta

Film Editor: Yoshiyasu Hamamura

Original Music: Toshiro Mayuzumi

Written by Yasujiro Ozu, Kogo Noda

Produced by Shizuo Yamanouchi

Directed by Yasujiro Ozu

Ozu’s Good Morning is a straight-out delight, being both inconsequential and insightful.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

David Reviews Yasujiro Ozu’s Good Morning [Criterion Blu-ray Review]

The long anticipated, seemingly inevitable but frustratingly overdue upgrade of Yasujiro Ozu’s second color film Good Morning finally became a reality earlier this week. A pristine new edition of Spine #84 has just landed on the shelves, and it’s a cause for joyful celebration for Ozu aficionados and newcomers alike, who now have the opportunity to rediscover one of the great director’s most enchanting films. It’s hard to overstate just how much a new transfer and a tidy array of supplemental features allow Good Morning‘s virtues to shine, but I can attest without reservation that this release feels every bit as essential and fully realized as any of the other three Ozu Blu-rays that Criterion has previously made available.

Yes, Tokyo Story, Late Spring and Autumn Afternoon, the director’s final film, are all widely esteemed as monumental works, whereas Good Morning is often relegated to “lesser Ozu” status.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Review: “Good Morning” (1959; Directed by Yasujiro Ozu) (The Criterion Collection)

  • CinemaRetro
“Greetings And Farts”

By Raymond Benson

Master filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu’s late-period picture, Good Morning (Ohayō), is a curious, but amusing, slice-of-life portrait of a suburban neighborhood in contemporary (circa 1959) Japan. Ozu, mostly known for the gendai-geki film genre, i.e., modern dramas about family life and social conditions, also made a few comedies. He was a genius at depicting relationships between parents and children (Tokyo Story, 1953, is arguably his most admirable work), and Good Morning presents something of a parable about how a couple of young schoolboys influence an entire community of suspicious and gossipy housewives and lackadaisical “salary men” husbands.

A Western audience will deem the comedy subtle; cultural differences between East and West, especially when it comes to bathroom humor, decidedly determine how funny someone will think Good Morning really is. There are a lot of fart jokes in the film. In fact, Ozu uses farting as a way that characters communicate,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Yasujirō Ozu’s 1929 Short Film ‘A Straightforward Boy’ Has Been Found

  • Indiewire
There’s been an epic find for serious film buffs this week. A nearly-finished 1929 film called “Tokkan Kozo,” or “A Straightforward Boy,” by the hugely-influential Japanese filmmaker Yasujirō Ozu has been uncovered. A representative of the Toy Film Museum in Kyoto and professor at the Osaka University of Arts, Yoneo Ota, announced the news at a September 6th conference.

Read More: 5 Essential Films By Yasujirō Ozu

“A Straightforward Boy” was gifted along with a collection of other films to the Toy Film Museum from the estate of a film fan. The found comedy is a shorter version of the 38 minute original movie, which remains lost, like many Japanese films shot before WWII. The museum is working to restore the film before it is screened later at the Kyoto International Film and Art Festival.

“A Straightforward Boy” depicts an abducted young boy who turns out too troublesome for his captor. The
See full article at Indiewire »

Kyoto Film Festival to Debut Never-Before-Seen Ozu Short

This year's Kyoto International Film Festival will host the World Premiere of a newly restored version of The Straightforward Boy, a 1929 short directed by master filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu. Available only in fragments before now, this early work from the director of Tokyo Story and Good Morning will screen in a new 19-minute version at this year's event, which runs from 13-16 October. The Straighforward Boy - which apparently ran 38 minutes on first release, but was long-thought lost - will play alongside Ozu's 1931 feature The Lady and the Beard, together with a Short Comedy Selection of long-lost works and a Toy Film Selection of silent shorts commissioned for toy projectors in the director's early days as a filmmaker. Now in its third edition, this year's Kiff will open with the...

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New York Asian 2016 Review: What A Wonderful Family! Mixes Broad Comedy with Ozu's Legacy

Yôji Yamada is a director known for retreading and reusing elements, both visual and in terms of plot, being the director of many series of movies that have been done across decades. While he really hasn't made a new series since the end of his Samurai Trilogy in 2006, he has recently favored the family chamber drama above any other, and in particular, he has decided to make countless references to the cinema of Yasujiro Ozu, being his most blatant a remake of the classic Tokyo Story, made in 2013 as Tokyo Family, which could be described as an homage as well as a demonstration of how little has changed in 60 years of Japanese family life. In his latest film, Yamada goes right into...

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