Joe Melia - News Poster

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Modesty Blaise

Joseph Losey doesn't normally make trendy, lighthearted genre films, and in this SuperSpy epic we find out why -- an impressive production and great music don't compensate for a lack of pace and dynamism, not to mention a narrow sense of humor. Yet it's a lounge classic, and a perverse favorite of spy movie fans. Modesty Blaise Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1966 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 119 min. / Street Date August 23, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Monica Vitti, Terence Stamp, Dirk Bogarde, Harry Andrews, Michael Craig, Clive Revill, Alexander Knox, Rossella Falk, Scilla Gabel, Tina Marquand Cinematography Jack Hildyard Production Designer Richard MacDonald, Jack Shampan Film Editor Reginald Beck Original Music John Dankworth Written by Evan Jones from a novel by Peter O'Donnell and a comic strip by Jim Holdaway Produced by Joseph Janni Directed by Joseph Losey

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

When I first reviewed a DVD of Modesty Blaise fourteen years ago,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Reviews: "The Hound Of The Baskervilles" (1983) And "The Sign Of Four" (1983) Starring Ian Richardson; Blu-ray Releases From Second Sight

  • CinemaRetro
By Tim Greaves

Numerous actors have occupied the role of Sherlock Holmes over the decades, some more suited to the shoes of author Arthur Conan Doyle's famous consulting detective than others. One of the finest portrayals is that by Ian Richardson. Yet, sadly, his is also one that is often overlooked, not leastways because he played the character just twice (in a pair of 1983 films made for television), but also because his light was to be quickly eclipsed a year later by the arrival on TV screens of Jeremy Brett, whose interpretation of Holmes is considered by many to be the definitive one.

Sy Weintraub – who produced several Tarzan movies throughout the 60s and was executive producer on the popular long-running Ron Ely TV series –teamed up with Otto Plaschkes (whose producer credits include Georgie Girl and The Holcroft Covenant) with the intention of making several Holmes adventures headlining Richardson.
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Oh! What a Lovely War

A pure-gold Savant favorite, Sir Richard Attenborough's first feature as director is a stylized pacifist epic of the insane tragedy of WW1, told through contemporary songs, with the irreverent lyrics given them by the soldiers themselves. And one will not want to miss a young Maggie Smith's music hall performance -- luring young conscripts to doom in the trenches. It's the strangest pacifist film ever, done in high style. Oh! What a Lovely War DVD The Warner Archive Collection 1969 / Color / 2:35 enhanced widescreen / 144 min. / Street Date September 22, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 16.99 Starring: Too many to name, see below. Cinematography Gerry Turpin Production Design Donald M. Ashton Art Direction Harry White Choreography Eleanor Fazan Film Editor Kevin Connor Original Music Alfred Ralston Written by Len Deighton from the musical play by Joan Littlewood from the radio play by Charles Chilton Produced by Richard Attenborough, Brian Duffy, Len Deighton Directed
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Letter: Joe Melia, master of ceremonies

In 1972, BBC2 launched a new series called Full House which showcased the performing arts in a long, live studio programme. There was music across the genres, new plays, poetry, comedy, arts events, happenings. Karlheinz Stockhausen rubbed shoulders with Jacques Tati, Roxy Music segued to Wh Auden. It was a bold venture that sometimes took off and sometimes didn't. To pull it together, as master of ceremonies, we cast Joe Melia. Some toffee-nosed commentators poured scorn on this decision, claiming that an actor would not have the right credentials to present an arts programme on TV. In the event, Joe took to the new role like a duck to water. Sans Autocue, he used his Brechtian skills to woo the camera and create an ambience for new ideas, experiment and adventure. He presented 21 live 90-minute programmes and then Melvyn Bragg took over with a more traditional (and definitely not live) arts programme,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Joe Melia obituary

Outstanding actor of stage and screen who made his name as Bri in A Day in the Death of Joe Egg

The British theatre changed for ever when Joe Melia, as the sardonic teacher Bri, pushed a severely disabled 10-year-old girl in a wheelchair on to the stage of the Glasgow Citizens in May 1967 and proceeded to make satirical jokes about the medical profession while his marriage was disintegrating. The play was Peter Nichols's A Day in the Death of Joe Egg, which transformed the way disability was discussed on the stage. It made the names overnight of its author, the director Michael Blakemore, and Melia. Albert Finney took over the role of Bri on Broadway.

Flat-footed, slightly hunched, always leaning towards a point of view, Melia, who has died aged 77, was a distinctive and compassionate actor who brought a strain of the music hall to the stage, a sense of being an outsider.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Joe Melia obituary

Outstanding actor of stage and screen who made his name as Bri in A Day in the Death of Joe Egg

The British theatre changed for ever when Joe Melia, as the sardonic teacher Bri, pushed a severely disabled 10-year-old girl in a wheelchair on to the stage of the Glasgow Citizens in May 1967 and proceeded to make satirical jokes about the medical profession while his marriage was disintegrating. The play was Peter Nichols's A Day in the Death of Joe Egg, which transformed the way disability was discussed on the stage. It made the names overnight of its author, the director Michael Blakemore, and Melia. Albert Finney took over the role of Bri on Broadway.

Flat-footed, slightly hunched, always leaning towards a point of view, Melia, who has died aged 77, was a distinctive and compassionate actor who brought a strain of the music hall to the stage, a sense of being an outsider.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Peter Nichols on Joe Melia: 'a Brechtian actor long before he appeared in Brecht'

Joe Melia's unique quality as an actor was his intelligence. Even when deep in character, he retained an objectivity that made him seem to be assessing the scene he was in, a quality that made him a Brechtian actor long before he appeared in Brecht.

Looking at photos of A Day in the Death of Joe Egg from 1967, that quality is there, even in stills of Joe looking intently at the cushion – held by Zena Walker playing Bri's wife, Sheila – standing in for their disabled child. Joe and Zena were a dynamic duo. I take some credit for having proposed Joe for the role after seeing him in the film Four in the Morning (1965).

Never an easy man, Joe was perverse enough not to take over the part on Broadway after Albert Finney had kickstarted it. The reason he gave was that the Us was a fascist country. I
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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