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First look at Lennie James In ‘Save Me Too’, the follow-up to ‘Save Me’

The very first-look image from Save Me Too, the sequel series to Save Me starring Lennie James has been released. The new run will begin next year.

Image provided by Sky

At the end of series one, which achieved an army of fans and became the most rapidly binged boxset in the Sky’s history,

In the new series, Nelly is left devastated when his desperate search for his daughter Jody is unsuccessful. To find Jody he has been dragged into a dark underworld, taken risks dangerous to himself and those closest to him, and challenged him to re-evaluate many of the decisions he has made about his life.

In the next gripping chapter of his quest we re-join Nelly seventeen months later. Is he still looking for his daughter? What hope is there of finding her? And if new evidence were to emerge what would it force Nelly to do next?
See full article at The Hollywood News »

The week in TV: The Innocents; Grayson Perry: Rites of Passage; Horizon and more

A new supernatural drama for young adults shows promise, while Grayson Perry immersed himself in the rituals of death

The Innocents (Netflix)

Grayson Perry: Rites of Passage (C4) | All 4

Horizon: Stopping Male Suicide (BBC2) | iPlayer

Manhunting With My Mum (C4) | All 4

You know you’re getting old when you start siding with the parents against the teenagers in a supernatural-themed love story. Eight-part Netflix series The Innocents is aimed at the ever-thriving teen/young adult market, where the tone usually wavers between gateway goth and Gcse emo studies. In this one, devised by Hania Elkington and Simon Duric, we first meet June (Sorcha Groundsell) just before her 16th birthday, as she’s kissing a love note to her young beau, Harry (Percelle Ascott), who has a mysteriously afflicted father and hardworking cop-mum (Nadine Marshall), neither of whom seem to deserve a runaway son (see what I mean?).
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Premiere Interviews: Guy Pearce, Sorcha Groundsell and Percelle Ascott on Netflix’s The Innocents

This week the cast gathered in London for the launch of the teenage supernatural love story The Innocents, the scary new Netflix Original series. It stars Sorcha Groundsell, Petcelle Ascott, Guy Pearce, Jóhannes Haukur Jóhannesson, Laura Birn, Sam Hazeldine, Lise Risom Olsen, Nadine Marshall and Trond Fausa. It was created by Simon Duric and Hania Elkington.

The Innocents arrives on Netflix on the 24th of August, here are our interviews.

The Innocents Interviews

Plot:

The Innocents is a teenage supernatural love story, which revolves around two teenagers, Harry and June, who run away from their repressive family to be together. After this, they are thrown into a journey of self-discovery, due to the secrets kept by their parents, which test their love. Besides this, their respective extraordinary gifts end up unleashing powerful forces, who intend on dividing them forever.

The post Premiere Interviews: Guy Pearce, Sorcha Groundsell and Percelle Ascott
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Review: Netflix’s ‘The Innocents’

  • Variety
Review: Netflix’s ‘The Innocents’
There may be no feeling more identifiable than those teenage years—the sensation of being out-of-place, clumsily mishandling your nascent adult powers and oftentimes stuck in the wrong skin altogether. This itchy sensation has long been the province of superhero comics and movies—it’s what fuels, say, the long-running “Spider-Man” franchise. And it’s put to clever and evocative use in Netflix’s “The Innocents,” a new series whose lead character (Sorcha Groundsell) has the power to shift between bodies; unlike most superheroes, though, she can barely control her gift and seeks to keep it hidden. Teens, the show’s obvious intended audience, will relate to “The Innocents'” high dudgeon, but adults will find a show that punches above its weight, defined by both its stirringly dramatic tone and the two charming performances at its center.

Groundsell’s June, who’s on the eve of her 16th birthday as the show begins,
See full article at Variety »

National Treasure

Network: Hulu. Episodes: Ongoing (hour). Seasons: Ongoing. TV show dates: March 1, 2017 — present. Series status: Has not been cancelled. Performers include: Robbie Coltrane, Julie Walters, Andrea Riseborough, Tim McInnerny, Babou Ceesay, Mark Lewis Jones, Nadine Marshall, Kate Hardie, Susan Lynch, Kerry Fox, Sarah Lancashire, Lia Williams, Steven Mackintosh, Finn Bennett, Felicia Mukasa, Lucian Msamati, Paapa Essiedu, Andi Osho, Wunmi Mosaku, and Sue Johnston. TV show description: From creator Jack Thorne, the National Treasure TV show is a British crime anthology series. In UK, the first season (i.e. "series") is entitled National Treasure, while the second is treated as a separate television program, entitled Kiri. Hulu has the Us rights to the drama, and refers to season two as National Treasure: Kiri. Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

'Dear White People': will the UK listen to race comedy?

  • ScreenDaily
'Dear White People': will the UK listen to race comedy?
Well-received race and identity comedy Dear White People marks the first acquisition for The New Black Film Collective but the film faces significant challenges in the UK.

Justin Simien’s Sundance-winning feature debut Dear White People, the identity comedy about the tension between white and black students at an elite university, was a critical and commercial success in the Us.

The low-budget indie – part-backed by crowd-funder Indiegogo - took $4.5m at the Us box office in October and was widely praised by Us and international critics.

Tessa Thompson (Copper) stars alongside well-known TV faces Tyler James Williams (Everybody Hates Chris) and Dennis Haysbert (24) in the film, which carries important messages about race and identity but also “smartly pinpoints people’s universal needs”.

The New York Times’ A.O Scott hailed the film as “as smart and fearless a debut as I have seen from an American filmmaker in quite some time…everyone should
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Second Coming review – mysterious drama with a heart of gold

Debbie Tucker Green’s dreamy, ambiguous urban parable is rooted in utterly believable performances

Miracles may be an everyday occurrence, but in a secular age they can be less of a blessing than a curse. Films as diverse as Carl Theodor Dreyer’s Ordet, Denys Arcand’s Jesus of Montreal and, more recently, Dietrich Brüggemann’s Stations of the Cross have wrestled with the anachronistic intersection between the domestic and the allegedly divine, with results ranging from comedy to tragedy. In terms of subject matter, playwright Debbie Tucker Green’s beautifully ambiguous debut feature perhaps bears comparison with Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland’s 2006 oddity Quinceañera (aka Echo Park La), in which a Mexican-American girl approaching her 15th birthday discovers she is pregnant, despite her certainty that she is still a virgin.

In Second Coming, Jackie (Nadine Marshall) is a middle-aged mum with a history of miscarriages whose family life
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Second Coming review – mysterious drama with a heart of gold

Debbie Tucker Green’s dreamy, ambiguous urban parable is rooted in utterly believable performances

Miracles may be an everyday occurrence, but in a secular age they can be less of a blessing than a curse. Films as diverse as Carl Theodor Dreyer’s Ordet, Denys Arcand’s Jesus of Montreal and, more recently, Dietrich Brüggemann’s Stations of the Cross have wrestled with the anachronistic intersection between the domestic and the allegedly divine, with results ranging from comedy to tragedy. In terms of subject matter, playwright Debbie Tucker Green’s beautifully ambiguous debut feature perhaps bears comparison with Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland’s 2006 oddity Quinceañera (aka Echo Park La), in which a Mexican-American girl approaching her 15th birthday discovers she is pregnant, despite her certainty that she is still a virgin.

In Second Coming, Jackie (Nadine Marshall) is a middle-aged mum with a history of miscarriages whose family life
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Review: 'Second Coming' Has an Amazing Premise But Ultimately Frustrates (In UK Theaters Today)

Debbie Tucker Green’s feature film debut, "Second Coming," has a premise that, religious or not, will probably pique your interest. That it’s set in present day London and that the family at the centre of the story is black, was another reason for me to get excited. Indeed, it was a delight to see a black family – a Normal – black family, portrayed on screen. No drugs, no knives, no guns… No drama. And therein lies the problem. Jax, played admirably by Nadine Marshall, has a dilemma. A dilemma the proportions of which you don’t really get too many clues about. Her husband, Mark, played by Idris Elba, is as perfect a husband as any woman could want. Her son, Jj (Kai Francis-Lewis)...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Second Coming - video review

  • The Guardian - Film News
In this excerpt from the Guardian film show, Xan Brooks, Peter Bradshaw and Benjamin Lee review Debbie Tucker Green's drama, which imagines what would happen if a virgin birth occurred in modern south London. Nadine Marshall plays Jackie, a social security worker who suddenly becomes pregnant, despite not having had sex with her husband (Idris Elba) for months. Second Coming is released in the UK on Friday 5 June Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Teaser Trailer For Idris Elba’s Second Coming

  • TheMovieBit
The directorial debut from acclaimed playwright Debbie Tucker Green, Second Coming hits our shores this Friday, June 5th, after a very good showing on the festival circuit. Starring Nadine Marshall and Idris Elba, the movie follows Jackie (Marshall) who finds herself falling pregnant, even though she hasn’t been with her husband Mark (Elba), or anyone else for that matter, in months. Keeping it a secret from her family, Jackie’s sanity starts to crumble as this seemingly immaculate conception begins to take a toll on her life.
See full article at TheMovieBit »

Film Movement Picks Up USA Rights for Debbie Tucker Green’s 'Second Coming' (Idris Elba, Nadine Marshall Star)

Film Movement has acquired USA distribution rights to award-winning British playwright Debbie Tucker Green’s feature film directorial debut, "Second Coming," and has set a 2016 release for it (no specific date given yet). Green’s "Second Coming" has a premise that, religious or not, will probably pique your interest. That it’s set in present day London and that the family at the centre of the story is black, was another reason for me to get excited. Indeed, it was a delight to see a black family – a Normal – black family, portrayed on screen. No drugs, no knives, no guns… No drama. And therein lies the problem. Jax, played admirably by Nadine Marshall, has a...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Premieres galore at Sydney Film Festival

Neil Armfield.s Holding the Man, Simon Stone.s The Daughter, Jeremy Sims. Last Cab to Darwin and Jen Peedom.s feature doc Sherpa will have their world premieres at the Sydney Film Festival.

The festival program unveiled today includes 33 world premieres (including 22 shorts) and 135 Australian premieres (with 18 shorts) among 251 titles from 68 countries.

Among the other premieres will be Daina Reid.s The Secret River, Ruby Entertainment's. ABC-tv miniseries starring Oliver Jackson Cohen and Sarah Snook, and three Oz docs, Marc Eberle.s The Cambodian Space Project — Not Easy Rock .n. Roll, Steve Thomas. Freedom Stories and Lisa Nicol.s Wide Open Sky.

Festival director Nashen Moodley boasted. this year.s event will be far larger than 2014's when 183 films from 47 countries were screened, including 15 world premieres. The expansion is possible in part due to the addition of two new screening venues in Newtown and Liverpool.

As previously announced, Brendan Cowell
See full article at IF.com.au »

First Trailer for Debbie Tucker Green’s 'Second Coming' (Idris Elba, Nadine Marshall Star)

Debbie Tucker Green’s feature film debut, "Second Coming," has a premise that, religious or not, will probably pique your interest. That it’s set in present day London and that the family at the centre of the story is black, was another reason for me to get excited. Indeed, it was a delight to see a black family – a Normal – black family, portrayed on screen. No drugs, no knives, no guns… No drama. And therein lies the problem. Jax, played admirably by Nadine Marshall, has a dilemma. A dilemma the proportions of which you don’t really get too many clues about. Her husband, Mark, played by Idris Elba, is as perfect a husband as any woman could want. Her son, Jj (Kai Francis-Lewis)...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Watch: Intense First Trailer For 'Second Coming' Starring Nadine Marshall And Idris Elba

Watch: Intense First Trailer For 'Second Coming' Starring Nadine Marshall And Idris Elba
It's been often said that film festivals are so crushed with programming that intriguing smaller films don't get the chance to shine. While "Second Coming" made its debut last fall at the Toronto International Film Festival, it's only making its mark now, and this intriguing first teaser should only help on that score. Nadine Marshall and Idris Elba star in the Debbie Tucker Green directed movie following a woman who has something rather remarkable happen to her: an immaculate conception. She's pregnant, but the baby isn't her husband's, with whom she hasn't slept in months —nor is it anyone else's. Here's the official synopsis: Set in present day London, Jackie (Nadine Marshall) is pregnant and knows it’s not her husband’s (Idris Elba). She says she hasn’t slept with anybody else, now she doesn’t know if she is losing her mind. Communication, trust and intimacy are at the heart of this warm,
See full article at The Playlist »

Idris Elba film up for Rotterdam award

  • ScreenDaily
Idris Elba film up for Rotterdam award
Iffr reveals Big Screen Awards nominees and the complete line-up for its Bright Future and Spectrum strands, including world premieres from the Us, China and the Netherlands.

Second Coming, starring Idris Elba and Nadine Marshall, has been named as one of 10 films up for the Big Screen Award at the International Film Festival Rotterdam (Iffr) (Jan 21 - Feb 1).

The UK film, written and directed by Debbie Tucker Green, will be vying for a prize of €10,000 ($12,000) awarded specifically to support theatrical distribution of the film in The Netherlands

The 10 nominees are from Iffr’s Bright Future and Spectrum programmes with the winner chosen by a specially selected audience jury. Other titles include Lisandro Alonso’s Cannes Fipresci winner Jauja and Carlos Vermut’s San Sebastian winner Magical Girl.

The nominees are:

I Swear I’ll Leave This Town, Danial AragãoJauja, Lisandro AlonsoKey House Mirror, Michael NoerThe Lesson, Kristina Grozeva, Petar ValchanovMagical Girl, Carlos VermutA
See full article at ScreenDaily »

58th BFI London Film Festival – Second Coming (2014)

Second Coming, 2014.

Directed by Debbie Tucker Green.

Starring Idris Elba, Nadine Marshall and Alex Lanipekun.

Synopsis:

A London woman is slowly driven mad by suddenly and inexplicably becoming pregnant.

Naming your film after a poorly received Stone Roses album could be a creative risk, but when your protagonist, Jax (Nadine Marshall), suddenly becomes pregnant without conception, you might just be justified. Her story is that of cramped kitchens and overcast council estates, all seen through the slightly shaky camera of British realism. Grounding such a fantastical premise (divine conception) in this gritty tradition gives the film a poetic aesthetic. Unforuntaely, though, the lengthy opening segment is a bit too realistic…i.e. mundane.

Luckily, surprise Idris Elba (Prometheus, Luther) is a wonderful thing. He can pop up anywhere. Be it in Sky TV commercials, DJ spots at swanky Shoreditch parties or in independent British cinema by first-time female directors, the man is immune to overexposure.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

London Film Festival Review: Debbie Tucker Green’s 'Second Coming' - An Amazing Premise But Ultimately Frustrates

Debbie Tucker Green’s feature film debut, "Second Coming," has a premise that, religious or not, will probably pique your interest. That it’s set in present day London and that the family at the centre of the story is black, was another reason for me to get excited. Indeed, it was a delight to see a black family – a Normal – black family, portrayed on screen. No drugs, no knives, no guns… No drama. And therein lies the problem. Jax, played admirably by Nadine Marshall, has a dilemma. A dilemma the proportions of which you don’t really get too many clues about. Her husband, Mark, played by Idris Elba, is as perfect a husband as any woman could want. Her son, Jj (Kai Francis-Lewis)...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Watch Idris Elba Play Daddy in First Clip From Slice of Life London-Set Drama 'Second Coming'

With her film debut “Second Coming”, playwright Debbie Tucker Green has created an intriguing if meandering portrait of an ordinary London family torn apart by the miraculous and the unexplained. Nadine Marshall plays Jax, a woman married for over twenty years to hard-working railway worker husband Mark (Idris Elba). Ever since having their first child Jj (Kai Francis Lewis), now 11, the couple have grown distant, partly due to experiencing four traumatizing miscarriages. And yet, when we meet Jax, we learn through vague, cryptic conversations between her and a friend that she’s several weeks pregnant, despite being told by doctors that she can never conceive again. She and...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Tiff 2014 Review: 'Second Coming' is an Intriguing if Meandering Portrait of Black Family Life in London

With her film debut “Second Coming”, playwright Debbie Tucker Green has created an intriguing if meandering portrait of an ordinary London family torn apart by the miraculous and the unexplained. Nadine Marshall plays Jax, a woman married for over twenty years to hard-working railway worker husband Mark (Idris Elba). Ever since having their first child Jj (Kai Francis Lewis), now 11, the couple have grown distant, partly due to experiencing four traumatizing miscarriages. And yet, when we meet Jax, we learn through vague, cryptic conversations between her and a friend that she’s several weeks pregnant, despite being told by doctors that she can never conceive again. She and...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »
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