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Knife + Heart | Review

Your Vice is a Locked Room and Only I Have the Key Light: Gonzalez’s Queer Giallo a Dicey Mélange

Love as an overwhelming, all-consuming fire seems to be the central conceit of Yann Gonzalez’s sophomore film Knife+Heart, a dizzying homage to Giallo cinema of the 1970s. Utilizing Vanessa Paradis in what might be her most enjoyable performance since Patrice Leconte’s The Girl on the Bridge (1999), Gonzalez sends us back to the seedy side of Paris in 1979, where a frazzled blonde lesbian producer of gay porn is inspired by the murder of one of her actors to embark on a more ambitious project by using the incident for her next film.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Criterion Collection: Panique (1946) | Blu-ray Review

Initially a box office flop and critical failure, French auteur Julien Duvivier’s 1946 title Panique is now hailed as one of the great technician’s finest achievements. The film was digitally restored and re-released theatrically in the Us in early 2017, but initially premiered at the 1946 Venice Film Festival. In a career which spanned nearly fifty years as a director, from 1919 to 1967, the title is arguably the best-known work from his mid-period, if not his entire career (with Patrice Leconte famously remaking it in 1989 with Sandrine Bonnaire and Michel Blanc as Monsieur Hire).…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Panique

For directing skill and sensual sophistication this psychologically intense murder tale equals or betters the most sophisticated American noirs. Julien Duvivier gives us Michel Simon as Monsieur Hire, a strange man loathed by his neighbors. Entranced by the woman he spies through his bedroom window, Hire doesn’t realize that she’s helping to frame him for murder, and then set him out like bait for a vengeful mob. The restored French classic is a beauty in every respect; the extras include a highly educational, must-see discussion of movie subtitling, by Bruce Goldstein.

Panique

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 955

1946 / B&W / 1:37 flat full frame / 98 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date December 18, 2018 / 39.95

Starring: Michel Simon, Viviane Romance, Paul Bernard, Charles Dorat, Lucas Gridoux.

Cinematography: Nicolas Hayer

Film Editor: Marthe Poncin

Special Effects: W. Percy Day

Original Music: Jean Weiner

Written by Julien Duvivier, Charles Spaak from a novel by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Veteran French producer Francis Boespflug dies aged 70

Boespflug co-founded Pyramide and was managing director of Warner France.

French producer Francis Boespflug, best known as the co-founder of historic Paris-based production and distribution company Pyramide and the former managing director of Warner France, has died aged of 70.

Boespflug first became involved in cinema in his native city of Strasbourg in north-eastern France, working as a student volunteer at a cinema-club aimed at under-privileged, difficult teenagers.

It was through this volunteer work he met his future wife and life-long collaborator, the late producer Fabienne Vonier, who at the time was the manager of Le Club, the arthouse theatre founded
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘The Chambermaid,’ ‘Museo’ Take Top Honors at Morelia Film Festival

  • Variety
Lila Avilés snagged the top prize at Friday night’s Morelia Intl. Film Festival closing ceremony with her debut feature, “The Chambermaid” (“La Camarista”), which world premiered at Toronto. It also took the Warrior of the Press award.

“Llegamos! Llegamos!” (“We made it! We made it!”), screamed Avilés all the way from her seat to the stage, before breathlessly explaining her excitement. “I used up all of my savings to make this film.”

Alonso Ruizpalacios’ “Museo,” starring Mexico’s most marketable actor Gael García Bernal, had the biggest impact on the public, scoring the Audience Award for best Mexican film. Best director also went to Ruizpalacios.

This year’s festival jury boasted a lineup as impressive as the competition itself. Led by writer-director Lynne Ramsay, the jury included filmmaker Patrice Leconte (“Monsieur Hire”), actor-director-producer Diego Luna, Efm founder Beki Probst and Academy Award-winning producer Adele Romanski.

The festival doled out
See full article at Variety »

‘The Alienist’ Stars Luke Evans & Daniel Bruhl Set As Leads In Dramedy Based On French Film

  • Deadline
‘The Alienist’ Stars Luke Evans & Daniel Bruhl Set As Leads In Dramedy Based On French Film
Exclusive: Luke Evans and Daniel Bruhl, stars of The Alienist, are reuniting with the team behind the TNT Emmy nominated limited series for an untitled dramedy feature inspired by the 2006 French film Mon Meilleur Ami (My Best Friend). Evans and Bruhl will star in the film based on an adaptation by Alienist co-showrunner and exec producer and E Max Frye. Rosalie Swedlin (Alienist Ep) is producing the project with Bard Dorros of Anonymous Content.

Directed by Patrice Leconte, the original pic centered on two very different men – one arrogant and cold, the other sweet and talkative – whose lives are thrown together when one accepts a bet to find a best friend and the other agrees to teach him the secret to making friends.

“This remake of the very charming French film Mon Meilleur Ami is a perfect opportunity to bring the dream team back together I enjoyed so much working with on The Alienist,
See full article at Deadline »

New Europe boards doc about controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk (exclusive)

New Europe boards doc about controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk (exclusive)
Revered in the 1970s he later became better known as a maker of erotic movies.

Warsaw-based sales outlet New Europe Film Sales has boarded world sales for the documentary Love Express: The Disappearance Of Walerian Borowczyk, which explores the career of controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk, the cult Polish director whose credits include Blanche and Immoral Tales.

The company is launching the film, which was co-produced by HBO Europe, at the Cannes market.

Revered in the 1970s, Borowczyk was hailed as a director of unparalleled sensitivity, before later becoming better known as a maker of erotic movies including Emmanuelle 5. The
See full article at ScreenDaily »

New Europe boards doc about controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk

New Europe boards doc about controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk
Revered in the 1970s he later became better known as a maker of erotic movies.

Warsaw-based sales outlet New Europe Film Sales has boarded world sales for the documentary Love Express: The Disappearance Of Walerian Borowczyk, which explores the career of controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk, the cult Polish director whose credits include Blanche and Immoral Tales.

The company is launching the film, which was co-produced by HBO Europe, at the Cannes market.

Revered in the 1970s, Borowczyk was hailed as a director of unparalleled sensitivity, before later becoming better known as a maker of erotic movies including Emmanuelle 5. The
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Leconte launches smartphone film festival by Richard Mowe - 2018-02-05 11:38:08

Patrice Leconte at the launch of this year’s Mobile Film Festival in Paris, flanked by fellow jurors Amelle Chahbi and Ruben Alves Photo: Richard Mowe As a way of opening up the world of cinema to budding filmmakers who have talent, ingenuity and a smart phone the Mobile Film Festival has been nurturing opportunities for new generations for the past 13 years.

At a launch for the current edition in Paris, the festival’s founder Bruno Smadja said: “Smartphones are easily accessible by young filmmakers today, anywhere in the world, and with impressive filming quality. And the use of one same affordable technology by all participants gives the event its egalitarian and inclusive characteristic.”

The challenge set for all entrants is to tell a story in one minute. “This is what the audience likes and what convinces our jury in their selections: the motions these shorts manage to convey in only one minute.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Leconte launches smartphone film festival by Richard Mowe - 2018-02-05 11:38:08

Patrice Leconte at the launch of this year’s Mobile Film Festival in Paris, flanked by fellow jurors Amelle Chahbi and Ruben Alves Photo: Richard Mowe As a way of opening up the world of cinema to budding filmmakers who have talent, ingenuity and a smart phone the Mobile Film Festival has been nurturing opportunities for new generations for the past 13 years.

At a launch for the current edition in Paris, the festival’s founder Bruno Smadja said: “Smartphones are easily accessible by young filmmakers today, anywhere in the world, and with impressive filming quality. And the use of one same affordable technology by all participants gives the event its egalitarian and inclusive characteristic.”

The challenge set for all entrants is to tell a story in one minute. “This is what the audience likes and what convinces our jury in their selections: the motions these shorts manage to convey in only one minute.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

The 25 Best French Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amélie’ to ‘Cache’

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best French Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amélie’ to ‘Cache’
Cinema was one of the truly international phenomenons of the last millennium, but France — more so than any other nation — has always been one of the medium’s most essential guiding lights. From the pioneer era of the Lumiere brothers, to the revolutionary New Wave that expanded our understanding of film’s potential, to the country’s recent defense of the theatrical experience, France has always pushed the movies forward while reminding us what we love about them in the first place. No country did more to help propel cinema into the 20th Century, and no country has done more to help sustain its integrity and its potential in the 21st.

From sultry thrillers to mind-blowing 3D experiments and one of the most heartbreakingly honest love stories ever told, these are the 25 best French films of the 21st Century.

Note: To qualify for our list, a film had to be
See full article at Indiewire »

Richard Fox to step down from Warner Bros

  • ScreenDaily
Beijing-based exec has been with the studio for 42 years.

Warner Bros executive vice president Richard Fox, who relocated to Beijing in 2015, is stepping away from his executive responsibilities this summer.

Fox has been with Warner Bros for 42 years and served as executive vice president, international, for the last 25 years. He moved to Beijing to drive Warner Bros’ activities in China, including its joint venture with China Media Capital (Cmc), Flagship Entertainment.

“Anywhere you go in the world, people in the film business love and respect Richard,” said Warner Bros chairman and CEO Kevin Tsujihara. “He knows the markets, he knows the players and he’s been an incredible executive and ambassador for the company…I thank him for his many contributions to the company and join his Warner Bros colleagues around the world in wishing him all the best.”

Fox spearheaded Warner Bros’ local-language production activities, which have included films such as Patrice Leconte’s Les Bronzés 3, [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The Truth About Zardoz, Plus Nine Other Things I Learned At Tcmff 2017

Just back from the 2017 TCM Classic Movie Festival with a few thoughts and thoughts about thoughts. I certainly held my reservations about this year’s edition, and though I ultimately ended up tiring early of flitting about from theater to theater like a mouse in a movie maze (it happens to even the most fanatically devoted of us on occasion, or so I’m told), there were, as always, several things I learned by attending Tcmff 2017 as well.

1) TCM Staffers Are Unfailingly Polite And Helpful

Thankfully I wasn’t witness, as I have been in past years, to any pass holders acting like spoiled children because they had to wait in a long queue or, heaven forbid, because they somehow didn’t get in to one of their preferred screenings. Part of what makes the Tcmff experience as pleasant as it often is can be credited to the tireless work
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Watch a Trailer for Rialto’s Upcoming Tour of Julien Duvivier’s Panique

Next month, the folks at Rialto will begin touring Julien Duvivier’s 1946 film, Panique.

Duvivier made 70 films between 1919 and 1967, many of them landmarks of French cinema. His first postwar project, a noir adaptation of Georges Simenon’s Mr. Hire’s Engagement (later adapted by Patrice Leconte as Monsieur Hire), stars Michel Simon as a reviled voyeur framed for a murder by the girl he adores. Now widely considered the finest Simenon adaptation but criticized at the time for its bleakness, the long-unseen Panique has finally been given the vivid restoration it deserves.

Here are the dates and places where the film will open first:

January 20 – 31 – New York, NY – Film Forum

February 3 – 9 – Chicago, Il – Gene Siskel Film Center

February 11, 13, & 16 – Baltimore, MD – The Charles

While Panique is not yet streaming on FilmStruck alongside several other Duvivier films, we’ll keep our fingers crossed for this film to join the Collection one day.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Fslc Announces Revival Lineup For 54th New York Film Festival

Fslc Announces Revival Lineup For 54th New York Film Festival
The Film Society of Lincoln Center has announced the lineup for the Revivals section, taking place during the 54th New York Film Festival (Nyff). The Revivals section showcases masterpieces from renowned filmmakers whose diverse and eclectic works have been digitally remastered, restored, and preserved with the assistance of generous partners.

Read More: Ava DuVernay’s Netflix Documentary ‘The 13th’ Will Open 54th New York Film Festival

Some of the films in the lineup include plenty of Nyff debuts returning once again: Gillo Pontecorvo’s “The Battle of Algiers,” which was the the Nyff Opening Night selection in 1967, Robert Bresson’s “L’argent,” and Barbara Kopple’s “Harlan County USA.” Also included are a program of Jacques Rivette’s early short films, Edward Yang’s second feature “Taipei Story,” Kenji Mizoguchi’s “Ugetsu,” and Marlon Brando’s solo directorial effort “One-Eyed Jacks.”

The Nyff previously announced three of the films screening
See full article at Indiewire »

Nyff 2016 Revivals Line-Up Features Robert Bresson, Edward Yang, Jacques Rivette, and More

As much as we’re excited for the already enticing line-up for the 2016 New York Film Festival, their Revivals slate is always a place where one can discover a number of classics or revisit favorite films. This year is no different as they have newly restored films from Robert Bresson, Edward Yang, Jacques Rivette, Marlon Brando, Kenji Mizoguchi, and more. Check out the line-up below and return for our coverage this fall. If you don’t live in New York City, there’s a good chance a number of these restorations will travel in the coming months (or year) as well as get the home video treatment.

L’argent

Directed by Robert Bresson

1983, France, 83m

Robert Bresson’s final film, an adaptation of Tolstoy’s story The Forged Coupon, is simultaneously bleak and luminous, and sharp enough to cut diamonds. The story of a counterfeit bill’s passage from hand
See full article at The Film Stage »

The 20 Best Black-and-White Movies of the Last 20 Years

  • Indiewire
The 20 Best Black-and-White Movies of the Last 20 Years
Once the default mode, black and white has now become a bold statement of artistic intention. What that intention is, however, seems to be a little bit different for all of the recent films that have made the most of it. Often, monochrome is used as a pipeline to the past — in “Good Night, and Good Luck,” a lack of color not only speaks to how history remembers Edward R. Murrow, it also conjures the imagery of his television news broadcasts. Michael Haneke’s “The White Ribbon” similarly uses the technique to take us back in time, but is less about recreating an era than it is about establishing a chokehold of fatalistic austerity.

“The Man Who Wasn’t There” is another period piece, but the lack of color in the Coen brothers’ film — which was shot in color and then bled dry — assumes a moral quality, making Billy Bob Thornton
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes 2016: Full jury announced

Today, the full jury for the 69th Cannes Film Festival was announced. The announcement comes after George Miller (Mad Max: Fury Road) was confirmed to head up the jury for this year’s festival, which kicks off in the south of France in just a couple of weeks.

Joining Miller are:

Arnaud Desplechin (Director, Writer – France), Kirsten Dunst (Actress – United States), Valeria Golino (Actress, Director, Writer, Producer – Italia), Mads Mikkelsen (Actor – Denmark), László Nemes (Director, Writer – Hungaria), Vanessa Paradis (Actress, Singer- France) ,Katayoon Shahabi (Producer – Iran), and Donald Sutherland (Actor – Canada).

Keep it Thn over the newxt few weeks for extensive Cannes coverage, which kicks off from May 11th, 2016.

Here’s the full press release.

Cannes has always sought to adopt a universal and international approach, and in tune with this tradition, George Miller will be surrounded by eight luminaries of world cinema, from Iran, Denmark, United States, Italia, France,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Cannes reveals Competition jury

  • ScreenDaily
Cannes reveals Competition jury
Donald Sutherland, Arnaud Desplechin, Vanessa Paradis among those to join president George Miller.

The 69th Cannes Film Festival jury, presided over by Mad Max director George Miller, will be made up of eight luminaries of world cinema, from Iran, Denmark, United States, Italy, France, Canada and Hungary.

The jury, made up of four women and four men, will comprise a collection of directors, actors and writers. They will decide on the prizes for the 21 films in Competition.

The jury:

George Miller – President

(Director, Writer, Producer – Australia)

Arnaud Desplechin (Director, Writer – France)

Kirsten Dunst (Actress– United States)

Valeria Golino (Actress, Director, Writer, Producer – Italia)

Mads Mikkelsen (Actor – Denmark)

László Nemes (Director, Writer – Hungaria)

Vanessa Paradis (Actress, Singer – France)

Katayoon Shahabi (Producer – Iran)

Donald Sutherland (Actor – Canada)

Arnaud Desplechin, Director, Writer (France)

Arnaud Desplechin became an official competitor at Cannes with The Sentinel, his first feature film. He then made My Sex Life… or How I Got
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes reveals 2016 jury

  • ScreenDaily
Cannes reveals 2016 jury
Donald Sutherland, Arnaud Desplechin, Vanessa Paradis among those to join president George Miller.

The 69th Cannes Film Festival, presided over by Mad Max director George Miller, will comprise eight luminaries of world cinema, from Iran, Denmark, United States, Italy, France, Canada and Hungary.

The jury, made up of four women and four men, comprises directors, actors and writers.

The jury:

George Miller – President

(Director, Writer, Producer – Australia)

Arnaud Desplechin (Director, Writer – France)

Kirsten Dunst (Actress– United States)

Valeria Golino (Actress, Director, Writer, Producer – Italia)

Mads Mikkelsen (Actor – Denmark)

László Nemes (Director, Writer – Hungaria)

Vanessa Paradis (Actress, Singer – France)

Katayoon Shahabi (Producer – Iran)

Donald Sutherland (Actor – Canada)

Arnaud Desplechin, Director, Writer (France)

Arnaud Desplechin became an official competitor at Cannes with The Sentinel, his first feature film. He then made My Sex Life… or How I Got into an Argument, which introduced a new generation of actors. The artists in his films have regularly been awarded the most
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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