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Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Book Gets Creepy New Cover—Check It Out and Also See 5 Past Covers!

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Book Gets Creepy New Cover—Check It Out and Also See 5 Past Covers!
Oompa, Loompa, doom-pa-dee-do, here is a creepy puzzle for you. Publisher Penguin U.K. recently revealed the cover of a new edition of late novelist Roald Dahl's beloved 1964 children's book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which marks its 50th anniversary this year. The image contains no Willy Wonka, no Charlie Bucket, no chocolate and no factory but rather a photo of a blonde girl dressed in a pink fur coat who would, by gum, even creep out ol' Slugworth. The new edition will be published in September under the Penguin Modern Classic label, which is intended for adults. Many people, including Chocolat author Joanne Harris, have said its image appears "sexualized" and drew comparisons...
See full article at E! Online »

1984: the romantic film. Love the idea?

George Orwell's novel is being re-tooled as a heartstring-plucker. Don't despair – share your dystopian visions of how bad it will be

The literary world is agog, reeling, aghast, at the news that Kristen Stewart is going to star in a romantic remake of 1984. You read that right. Romantic. Remake. 1984.

I've had to check to make sure it isn't 1 April. It isn't. This is happening, people. "Equals is an adaptation of the 1956 film 1984, which itself was based on George Orwell's classic novel about rebellion in a futuristic society," runs the story. Stewart told the AP that the remake is "a love story of epic, epic, epic proportion", where "things go wrong because you can't deny the humanity in everyone". "It's the most devastating story," she said. "I'm terrified of it. Though it's a movie with a really basic concept, it's overtly ambitious."

Indeed.

Anyway, the news has sent literary types into a flat spin.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

It's a new Viking invasion of Britain – but this time it's cultural

After the discovery of a Viking burial site in Scotland, Norse history and myths are the focus of a TV saga, epic novels and a major British Museum exhibition

Longboats, funeral pyres, glinting helmets and drinking horns: the discovery of a buried Viking boat in the west Highlands a few days ago has given an extra fillip to a burgeoning cultural fascination with all things Norse.

A succession of Viking literary sagas, films and television series, pieces of poetry and avant-garde art, not to mention preparations for a major British Museum show, are now all on the slipway.

More than 50 years after actors Kirk Douglas and Tony Curtis donned their woollen tunics for Hollywood blockbuster The Vikings, a television series of the same name and a TV version of British writer Neil Gaiman's Nordic gods-inspired bestseller, American Gods, are both in development. The Vikings, which picks up on interest
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

It's a new Viking invasion of Britain – but this time it's cultural

After the discovery of a Viking burial site in Scotland, Norse history and myths are the focus of a TV saga, epic novels and a major British Museum exhibition

Longboats, funeral pyres, glinting helmets and drinking horns: the discovery of a buried Viking boat in the west Highlands a few days ago has given an extra fillip to a burgeoning cultural fascination with all things Norse.

A succession of Viking literary sagas, films and television series, pieces of poetry and avant-garde art, not to mention preparations for a major British Museum show, are now all on the slipway.

More than 50 years after actors Kirk Douglas and Tony Curtis donned their woollen tunics for Hollywood blockbuster The Vikings, a television series of the same name and a TV version of British writer Neil Gaiman's Nordic gods-inspired bestseller, American Gods, are both in development. The Vikings, which picks up on interest
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Being Juliette Binoche

She's not a feminist, but says women are born creative. Juliette Binoche talks to Laura Barnett about her spat with Gérard Depardieu, bad reviews – and why acting is like peeling onions

One Sunday a couple of months ago, Juliette Binoche bumped into Gérard Depardieu while shopping in a Paris market. It was the first time the two titans of French cinema had met since Depardieu's bizarre public rant last year, in which he described her as "nothing" and "nobody".

"I just went up to him and grabbed him," she says, "and said, 'Hey, what happened, Gérard? Why are you so aggressive with me? What did I do to you?'"

Binoche turns up her palms and shrugs her shoulders, in that uniquely Gallic expression of frustration. "He said, 'Oh, I'm stupid. Sometimes I just do that, blah, blah.' Later, his agent called my agent to say, 'Gérard is very happy you are reconciled.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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